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The users controller is named UsersController for the simple reasons because it controls multiple users, but in reality doesn't it change only a couple of parameters which are specific for the certain user?

Therefore, the most logical thing for me would then be that a controller names Dashboard should be named DashboardsController since it controls multiple Dashboards across numerous PC's and because of the slight change in certain spesific field after rendering the page, for that reason it should be named Dashboards. Like Users are named Users and not User...

That brings me though back to the starting point. How do I decide what to choose; plural or singular? Dashboard is only one specific thing in the application, while users aren't really controlling just their own, but again Dashboards are all different when the usernames get rendered on the page, as well as specific user favored tags.

What would be the best practice with this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The rails convention is to define controller names using plural (e.g /dashboards). This isn't set in stone, and you can change this to fit your needs, but if you're asking what the best practice is, then your best bet is to stick with the rails convention, especially if you're just getting started with rails. It will make your life much simpler.

If you really want to use a singular term for your controller (e.g /dashboard), you can specify that in your routes.rb file (this assumes you're using RESTful routes and defining dashboard as a resource)

resource :dashboard, :controller => 'dashboard'

Also note that if you decide to go with singular, you'll need to adjust the helper methods rails creates for RESTful routes accordingly, so

  dashboards_path # will no longer work, you must use
  dashboard_path 
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Then I'll stick to the pluralized version of dashboard and the word doesn't really matter that much I guess :P Thanks! –  HotChickFromAlaska Jan 25 '13 at 23:54

Using plural names for controllers is just one of Rails convention. Should you deviate from the convention? I think it's better if you stick to it.

Plural names usually sound more natural, as you mentioned Users. I'm positively sure that your DashboardsController will have more than one action(s) so it goes back to the idea of pluralism.

My advice stick with the plural convention.

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Then I'll stick with it as well, and maybe I'll integrate som presenter gem or some made from scratch thing later on, but until then I ain't changing to a singular form. Sooo thanks! =) –  HotChickFromAlaska Jan 25 '13 at 23:55

I tend to use the presenter pattern for dashboards. Dashboards are a hybrid of objects and it's tough to think of it as a show or index page. I'll make a virtual object to handle the queries and aggregation of the associated objects. It really cleans up the controller code, even if you decide to go with a DashboardsController.

But, I'd recommend adding to resources.users in routes.

collection do 
  get :dashboard
end

And then under UsersController add an action dashboard

def dashboard
  @presenter = UserDashboardPresenter.new(user)
end

Use the @presenter in the view.

You'll find more on the presenter pattern if you search on it. It's great for caching, code reuse, testing, and performance enhancements.

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I'll keep your recommendation of using presenters in the backhead because it isn't a bad idea. I checked RailsCasts, Draper could work nicely or I could make it from scratch, but until I start getting too much logic in the view I'll stick to the pluralized version of Dashboard. Thank you :) –  HotChickFromAlaska Jan 25 '13 at 23:53
    
I don't use Draper, it's a little different. I tend to think of these classes as View Models - they encapsulate things nicely for the view. If you start seeing a long list of instance variables in the controller or lots of logic based on the user, this is one way to clean it up. –  Swards Jan 26 '13 at 0:00

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