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Say I have an array of positive whole integers; I'd like to manipulate the order so that the concatenation of the resultant array is the largest number possible. For example [97, 9, 13] results in 99713; [9,1,95,17,5] results in 9955171. I'm not sure of an answer.

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I can't find where it says in the FAQ that so-called "brain-teasers" should not be allowed (although I would be glad if you could point it out for me). This is a clearly defined algorithms problem. –  Steven Liao Jan 26 '13 at 0:21
    
I tagged it as exercise since it clearly is, and hinted instead of answered, then someone removed the tag. At this point it may as well be closed. –  Russell Borogove Jan 26 '13 at 0:34
1  
@MartijnPieters this is very light mathematics. –  mmgp Jan 26 '13 at 4:45

7 Answers 7

sorted(x, cmp=lambda a, b: -1 if str(b)+str(a) < str(a)+str(b) else 1)

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This appears to work, and is going to be much faster than exhaustive permutations for large lists. –  Russell Borogove Jan 26 '13 at 19:14
    
Yup, this works, but like other cmp solutions, won't work on Python 3. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 26 '13 at 21:49
    
(unless you use functools.cmp_to_key() of course, which cheats). –  Martijn Pieters Jan 26 '13 at 22:07
    
@MartijnPieters what point are you trying to make ? That it was a bad decision to remove cmp from Python 3 ? –  mmgp Jan 26 '13 at 22:22
1  
@mmgp: nope; more that I now fully understand how the functools.cmp_to_key() method works; see the Py 3 Sorting Howto. It cheats. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Jan 26 '13 at 22:24

Intuitively, we can see that a reverse sort of single digit numbers would lead to the higest number:

>>> ''.join(sorted(['1', '5', '2', '9'], reverse=True))
'9521'

so reverse sorting should work. The problem arises when there are multi-digit snippets in the input. Here, intuition again lets us order 9 before 95 and 17 before 1, but why does that work? Again, if they had been the same length, it would have been clear how to sort them:

95 < 99
97 < 96
14 < 17

The trick then, is to 'extend' shorter numbers so they can be compared with the longer ones and can be sorted automatically, lexographically. All you need to do, really, is to repeat the snippet to beyond the maximum length:

  • comparing 9 and 95: compare 999 and 9595 instead and thus 999 comes first.
  • comparing 1 and 17: compare 111 and 1717 instead and thus 1717 comes first.
  • comparing 132 and 13: compare 132132 and 1313 instead and thus 132132 comes firrst.
  • comparing 23 and 2341: compare 232323 and 23412341 instead and thus 2341 comes first.

This works because python only needs to compare the two snippets until they differ somewhere; and it's (repeating) matching prefixes that we need to skip when comparing two snippets to determine which order they need to be in to form a largest number.

You only need to repeat a snippet until it is longer than the longest snippet * 2 in the input to guarantee that you can find the first non-matching digit when comparing two snippets.

You can do this with a search key, but you need to determine the max length of the snippets first. Using that length, you can 'pad' all snippets until they are longer than that max length:

def largestpossible(snippets):
    snippets = map(str, snippets)
    mlen = max(len(s) for s in snippets) * 2  # double the longest snippet too
    return ''.join(sorted(snippets, reverse=True, key=lambda s: s*(mlen//len(s)+1)))

where s*(mlen//len(s)+1) pads the snippet with itself to be more than mlen in length.

This gives:

>>> combos = {
...     '12012011': [1201, 120, 1],
...     '87887': [87, 878],
...     '99713': [97, 9, 13],
...     '9955171': [9, 1, 95, 17, 5],
...     '99799713': [97, 9, 13, 979],
...     '10100': [100, 10],
...     '13213': [13, 132],
...     '8788717': [87, 17, 878],
...     '93621221': [936, 21, 212],
...     '11101110': [1, 1101, 110],
... }
>>> def test(f):
...     for k,v in combos.items():
...         print '{} -> {} ({})'.format(v, f(v), 'correct' if f(v) == k else 'incorrect, should be {}'.format(k))
... 
>>> test(largestpossible)
[97, 9, 13] -> 99713 (correct)
[1, 1101, 110] -> 11101110 (correct)
[936, 21, 212] -> 93621221 (correct)
[13, 132] -> 13213 (correct)
[97, 9, 13, 979] -> 99799713 (correct)
[87, 878] -> 87887 (correct)
[1201, 120, 1] -> 12012011 (correct)
[100, 10] -> 10100 (correct)
[9, 1, 95, 17, 5] -> 9955171 (correct)
[87, 17, 878] -> 8788717 (correct)

Note that this solution is a) 3 lines short and b) works on Python 3 as well without having to resort to functools.cmp_to_key() and c) does not bruteforce the solution (which is what the itertools.permutations option does).

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I'm not sure this works: largestpossible([20, 101]) == '10120'. –  DSM Jan 26 '13 at 18:36
    
@DSM: Fixed, I managed to find test cases where I didn't realize I had mixed ljust with rjust. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 26 '13 at 18:39
    
Unfortunately largestpossible([100, 10]) == 10010 < 10100. –  DSM Jan 26 '13 at 18:44
    
@DSM: See, I knew adding the negative length was going to be required... :-) Fixed again, now it works for that case too. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 26 '13 at 18:48
1  
I'm going to stop now: largestpossible([13, 132]) == 13132. I'm really not trying to be That Guy :^), I just had this test code from the other day when I tried my own hand at this, and bounced, and then ran out of time.. –  DSM Jan 26 '13 at 18:54

Hint one: you concatenate strings, not integers. Hint two: itertools.permutations().

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But don't sort them as numbers. –  ypercube Jan 25 '13 at 23:50
    
@MartijnPieters not sure that would work. 95 > 9 therefore the numbers would not appear in the correct order. Sorting as strings also wouldn't work either, "95" > "9". Other (more than edge) cases jump out as you play with the problem more. I believe Russell's suggestion of using itertools implies a brute force approach. –  Endophage Jan 25 '13 at 23:52
    
@MartijnPieters I'd rather you try it and see it still doesn't work... –  Endophage Jan 25 '13 at 23:54
    
@MartijnPieters sorting the numbers in the title as produces ['1', '17', '5', '9', '95'], doesn't matter which way you concatenate it the answer is wrong. –  Endophage Jan 25 '13 at 23:57
3  
@ypercube: Unfortunately, it's not so simple. Not with the variable length of the parts. 9 should come before 95, but 17 should come before 1. I believe that a sorting order on the first digit, then a scoring for the following digits (higher, missing, lower) would work, but not 100% certain. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 26 '13 at 0:08
import itertools
nums =  ["9", "97", "13"]
m = max(("".join(p) for p in itertools.permutations(nums)), key = int)

You can use itertools.permutations as hinted and use the key argument of the max function (which tells which function to apply to each element in order to decide the maximum) after you concat them with the join function.

It's easier to work with strings to begin with.

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I don't like the brute force approach to this. It requires a massive amount of computation for large sets.

You can write your own comparison function for the sorted builtin method, which will return a sorting parameter for any pair, based on any logic you put in the function.

Sample code:

def compareInts(a,b):
    # create string representations
    sa = str(a)
    sb = str(b)

    # compare character by character, left to right
    # up to first inequality
    # if you hit the end of one str before the other, 
    # and all is equal up til then, continue to next step
    for i in xrange(min(len(sa), len(sb))):
        if sa[i] > sb[i]:
            return 1
        elif sa[i] < sb[i]:
            return -1

    # if we got here, they are both identical up to the length of the shorter
    # one.
    # this means we need to compare the shorter number again to the 
    # remainder of the longer
    # at this point we need to know which is shorter
    if len(sa) > len(sb): # sa is longer, so slice it
        return compareInts(sa[len(sb):], sb)
    elif len(sa) < len(sb): # sb is longer, slice it
        return compareInts(sa, sb[len(sa):])
    else:
        # both are the same length, and therefore equal, return 0
        return 0



def NumberFromList(numlist):
    return int(''.join('{}'.format(n) for n in numlist))

nums = [97, 9, 13, 979]
sortednums = sorted(nums, cmp = compareInts, reverse = True)
print nums # [97, 9, 13, 979]
print sortednums # [9, 979, 97, 13]
print NumberFromList(sortednums) # 99799713
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Appears to work. –  Russell Borogove Jan 26 '13 at 19:19

Well, there's always the brute force approach...

from itertools import permutations
lst = [9, 1, 95, 17, 5]

max(int(''.join(str(x) for x in y)) for y in permutations(lst))
=> 9955171

Or this, an adaptation of @Zah's answer that receives a list of integers and returns an integer, as specified in the question:

int(max((''.join(y) for y in permutations(str(x) for x in lst)), key=int))
=> 9955171
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You can do this with some clever sorting.

If two strings are the same length, choose the larger of the two to come first. Easy.

If they're not the same length, figure out what would be the result if the best possible combination were appended to the shorter one. Since everything that follows the shorter one must be equal to or less than it, you can determine this by appending the short one to itself until it's the same size as the longer one. Once they're the same length you do a direct comparison as before.

If the second comparison is equal, you've proven that the shorter string can't possibly be better than the longer one. Depending on what it's paired with it could still come out worse, so the longer one should come first.

def compare(s1, s2):
    if len(s1) == len(s2):
        return -1 if s1 > s2 else int(s2 > s1)
    s1x, s2x = s1, s2
    m = max(len(s1), len(s2))
    while len(s1x) < m:
        s1x = s1x + s1
    s1x = s1x[:m]
    while len(s2x) < m:
        s2x = s2x + s2
    s2x = s2x[:m]
    return -1 if s1x > s2x or (s1x == s2x and len(s1) > len(s2)) else 1

def solve_puzzle(seq):
    return ''.join(sorted([str(x) for x in seq], cmp=compare))

>>> solve_puzzle([9, 1, 95, 17, 5])
'9955171'
>>> solve_puzzle([97, 9, 13])
'99713'
>>> solve_puzzle([936, 21, 212])
'93621221'
>>> solve_puzzle([87, 17, 878])
'8788717'
>>> solve_puzzle([97, 9, 13, 979])
'99799713'

This should be much more efficient than running through all the permutations.

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Fails for e.g. [936, 21, 212]. –  Russell Borogove Jan 26 '13 at 19:16
    
And for [87, 17, 878] and [97, 9, 13, 979]. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 26 '13 at 21:50
    
@RussellBorogove and MartijnPieters, as I said I didn't have the ties worked out and both of your examples have that case. I have a fix in mind, just have to test it now. –  Mark Ransom Jan 26 '13 at 21:54
    
That covers all the test cases I have so far. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 26 '13 at 22:16
    
New one: [1201, 120, 1], yours and mine both fail that one. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 26 '13 at 22:27

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