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We found this while testing, one machine was setup with MyISAM as the default engine and one was set with InnoDB as the default engine. We have code similar to the following

class StudyManager(models.Manager):
    def scored(self, school=None, student=None):
        qset = self.objects.all()
        if school:
            qset = qset.filter(school=school)
        if student:
            qset = qset.filter(student=student)
        return qset.order_by('something')

The problem code looked like this:

print Study.objects.scored(student).count()

which meant that the "student" was being treated as a school. This got thru testing in with MyISAM because student.id == school.id because MyISAM can't do a rollback and gets completely re-created each test (resetting the autoincrement id field). InnoDB caught these errors because rollback evidently does not reset the autoincrement fields.

Problem is, during testing, there could be many other errors that are going uncaught due to duck typing since all models have an id field. I'm worried about the id's on objects lining up (in production or in testing) and that causing problems/failing to find the bugs.

I could add asserts like so:

class StudyManager(models.Manager):
    def scored(self, school=None, student=None):
        qset = self.objects.all()
        if school:
            assert(isinstance(school, School))
            qset = qset.filter(school=school)
        if student:
            assert(isinstance(student, Student))
            qset = qset.filter(student=student)
        return qset.order_by('something')

But this looks nasty, and is a lot of work (to go back and retrofit). It's also slower in debug mode.

I've thought about the idea that the id field for the models could be coerced into model_id (student_id for Student, school_id for School) so that schools would not have a student_id, this would only involve specifying the primary key field, but django has a shortcut for that in .pk so I'm guessing that might not help in all cases.

Is there a more elegant solution to catching this kind of bug? Being an old C++ hand, I kind of miss type safety.

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2  
This is convention and not foolproof, but one way to avoid this type of error is to get into the habit of naming your arguments: Study.objects.scored(student=student).count() ... y'know, Python zen recommends explicit over implicit. –  mVChr Jan 26 '13 at 0:10
1  
You could accept **kwargs and ensure only 'school' or 'student' is passed in. Prevent accidental positional args. –  Yuji 'Tomita' Tomita Jan 26 '13 at 0:57

1 Answer 1

This is an aspect of Python and has nothing to do with Django per se.

By defining default values for function parameters you do not eliminate the concept of positional arguments — you simply make it possible to not specify all parameters when invoking the function. @mVChr is correct in saying that you need to get in the habit of using the parameter name(s) when you call the routine, particularly when there is inherent ambiguity in just what it is being called with.

You might also consider having two separate routines whose names quiet clearly identify their expected parameter types.

share|improve this answer
    
Yea, I realize it is more python that Django, but I'm wondering if Django makes it worse because all models have a field named 'id'. –  Mark0978 Jan 27 '13 at 0:54
    
It doesn't make it "worse", it just means you encountered this "feature" now rather than later. Any time you get into a situation where polymorphism (at any level) is blended with ambiguity, you're in trouble. OTOH, Python (and Django) give you so much power (expressiveness, productivity, etc.), it's worth it to have to practice a little discipline ... sorta like having a Barrett M82A1, you just need to know where to point it! :-) –  Peter Rowell Jan 27 '13 at 2:18
    
The problem came about from an argument being added after the fact. But yea it seems like naming all the params at call time might be what should be done here. Hopefully pylint will help enforce that. –  Mark0978 Jan 28 '13 at 4:11

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