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In this code snippet, the Init() function acts as a on-demand initializer that fills in all member variables of the structure. This is done to avoid calling default constructors all members of a large array on the stack:

struct Foo {
    int m_Member;
    void Init(int i);
};

void Foo::Init(int i) {
    m_Member = i;
    // Many other members initialized here.
}

void SomeFunction(int n) {
    Foo buffer[64];
    assert(n <= 64);
    // Explicitly initialize what is needed.
    for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
        buffer[i].Init(i * 3);
    }
    // Use buffer[0] - buffer[n-1] somehow.
}

This triggers a static analysis error in VS2012 with /analyze:

warning C6001: Using uninitialized memory 'buffer'.: Lines: 17, 19, 20

I'm looking for a way to annotate Foo::Init() so that this warning doesn't occur. There are plenty of other ways to make the warning go away, including:

  • Adding an empty constructor
  • Moving Init() to the constructor and calling placement new in the loop

But I'd like to avoid changing the structure of the code.

I've tried the following annotation without success:

void _At_(this, _Out_) Init();

This syntax is accepted, but only changes the warning to be:

warning C6001: Using uninitialized memory 'buffer'.: Lines: 18, 20, 21
warning C6001: Using uninitialized memory 'buffer[BYTE:0]'.: Lines: 18, 20, 21

Does anyone know how I can declare the intent of this Init() function to the static analysis engine?

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1  
This would be a better question if uniform default initialization didn't work... for example if you needed to call Init(n). –  Ben Voigt Jan 26 '13 at 0:30
    
@BenVoigt Thanks, updated the example. –  deplinenoise Jan 26 '13 at 1:21
    
Is a #pragma push/disable:6001/pop around the function acceptable? –  Justicle Jan 26 '13 at 1:42

3 Answers 3

Your question is somewhat elusive. You have shown SomeFunction taking int, but want annotation for method Init or constructor.

The warning shown is absolutely correct, assert won't hide the warning. You need to put if to check if n is greateer than 64 and reset n (or do something else, but not to loop when n>=64).

For annotation you need to use __in_bcount or similar alternative. An example:

bool SetBuffer(__in_bcount(8) const char* sBuffer);

Whichs says sBuffer is of 8 bytes (not elements).

You can read this this article for more information.

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Too ugly to add an extra helper?

struct Foo {
    int m_Member;
    void Init(int i);
};

void Foo::Init(int i) {
    m_Member = i;
    // Many other members initialized here.
}

void Initialize(__in_bcount(sizeof(Foo) * n) Foo* buffer, int n) {
    // Explicitly initialize what is needed.
    for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
        buffer[i].Init(i * 3);
    }
}

void SomeFunction(int n) {
    Foo buffer[64];
    assert(n <= 64);
    Initialize(buffer, n);
    // Use buffer[0] - buffer[n-1] somehow.
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works, but there's plenty of code already using the Init()-is-constructor semantics, so it'd be nice to not have to rewrite them. Maybe a template could paper over some of it though. –  deplinenoise Jan 28 '13 at 18:59

Just add a default constructor (that calls Init()). What is wrong with that?

[Edit] The root problem is not how to lie to the static analyzer or your compiler. It is how to enforce that you don't leave foo in an uninitialized state. There is nothing wrong with adding a default constructor. I'd say the desire to NOT do it imposes risk.

Perhaps some client will use that poorly constructed foo class (Long after you wrote it and long after you are gone) and perhaps they will forget to call .Init() ?? What then? They will be left with data that is uninitialized.

If you are looking to enforce that rule, no amount of static analysis will help you there.

Take care of the foundation before you put on the roof.

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The static analyzer should then report a problem with the code that forgets to call Init. But there shouldn't be warnings for this code. In fact, adding a default constructor is harmful because it then allows code that doesn't call Init to slip by without a warning. –  Ben Voigt Jan 26 '13 at 0:28
    
Ah, I see, I was thinking in my mind, default constructor calls Init, but never wrote the last part (Though I strongly implied in my edit). I'll modify my answer. –  C Johnson Jan 26 '13 at 0:34
    
What about the case where initialization requires parameters? Then the default constructor can't leave the object in a valid/useful state. –  Ben Voigt Jan 26 '13 at 0:34
    
That's a different use case the Original poster never brought up... But of course in that case the dev has to provide a constructor with params, or an Init function with params... But we are quickly digressing here... –  C Johnson Jan 26 '13 at 0:35

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