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I was playing with an implementation of a power function:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int pow(int b, int e)
{

int result;

  if (e == -1 && b != 0)
  {
    cout << "b = " << 1/b << endl;
    return 1/b;
  }

  else if (b != 0 && e != 0)
  {
    //int e_int(int (e));
    bool e_bool(e < 0);
    e = (e_bool*-e + !e_bool*e);
    result = b = pow(b, -e_bool)*(b*!e_bool + +e_bool);
    cout << endl << "\"result\" = " << result << " " << e << endl;

    for(int i = 1; i < e; i += 1)
    {

      result *= b;

    }
    return result;
  }

  else if (e != 0 && b == 0)
  {
    return 0;
  }

  else if (e == 0 && b != 0)
  {
    return 1;
  }

  else if (b == 1)
  {
    return 1;
  }

  else if (e == 1)
  {
    return b;
  }

  else
  {
    cout << endl << "Error";
    return -1;
  }
}

int main ()
{
  cout << endl << pow(-2, -1);

  return 0;
}

The output is:

b = 0

0

Question is, why does b get set to 0?

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closed as too localized by Mitch Wheat, Carl Norum, Luchian Grigore, billz, DocMax Jan 26 '13 at 0:34

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
have you tried using a debugger? – Andy Prowl Jan 26 '13 at 0:26
2  
did you try debugging? – Luchian Grigore Jan 26 '13 at 0:27
1  
What do you think 1/2 is? – Marc Glisse Jan 26 '13 at 0:27
1  
Next time try to come up with a minimalistic example. Just too much noise here. – Karoly Horvath Jan 26 '13 at 0:29
2  
@NikolaNinkovic: that depends on your level. If you are still learning, your brain might just not be sufficiently trained. – Andy Prowl Jan 26 '13 at 0:30
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Integer division can only produce integer results. Your program causes this line:

cout << "b = " << 1/b << endl;

To run, and if b is any integer larger than 1, the result will be 0.

share|improve this answer

I would not say b gets set to 0. Inside your function you have this statement:

cout << "b = " << 1/b << endl;

Since b is an integer, 1/b is integer division and the value is ends up being 0.

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