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I am in the process of comparing Fortran 90 vs C++ for a presentation. One of my comparisons relies on the assembly generated for simple programs by g++ and gfortran.

One example reads as follows:

#include<cstdio> // quick and dirty number formatting

template<int N>
double dot(double x[], double y[]){
  return x[N-1] * y[N-1] + dot<N-1>(x, y);
}

template<>
double dot<1>(double x[], double y[]){
  return x[0] * y[0];
}

int main(){
  double x[] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10};
  double y[] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10};
  printf("x.y = %23.16E\n", dot<10>(x, y));
}

The following assembler is generated by the command g++ -S -O3 myprogram.cpp using g++ 4.7.2 on OS X 10.7.4 x86_64-apple-darwin11.4.2:

    .text
    .align 4,0x90
    .globl __Z3dotILi1EEdPdS0_
__Z3dotILi1EEdPdS0_:
LFB2:
    movsd   (%rdi), %xmm0
    mulsd   (%rsi), %xmm0
    ret
LFE2:
    .cstring
LC1:
    .ascii "x.y = %23.16E\12\0"
    .section __TEXT,__text_startup,regular,pure_instructions
    .align 4
    .globl _main
_main:
LFB3:
    leaq    LC1(%rip), %rdi
    subq    $8, %rsp
LCFI0:
    movl    $1, %eax
    movsd   LC0(%rip), %xmm0
    call    _printf
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    addq    $8, %rsp
LCFI1:
    ret
LFE3:
    .literal8
    .align 3
LC0:
    .long   0
    .long   1081610240
    .section __TEXT,__eh_frame,coalesced,no_toc+strip_static_syms+live_support
EH_frame1:
    .set L$set$0,LECIE1-LSCIE1
    .long L$set$0
LSCIE1:
    .long   0
    .byte   0x1
    .ascii "zR\0"
    .byte   0x1
    .byte   0x78
    .byte   0x10
    .byte   0x1
    .byte   0x10
    .byte   0xc
    .byte   0x7
    .byte   0x8
    .byte   0x90
    .byte   0x1
    .align 3
LECIE1:
LSFDE1:
    .set L$set$1,LEFDE1-LASFDE1
    .long L$set$1
LASFDE1:
    .long   LASFDE1-EH_frame1
    .quad   LFB2-.
    .set L$set$2,LFE2-LFB2
    .quad L$set$2
    .byte   0
    .align 3
LEFDE1:
LSFDE3:
    .set L$set$3,LEFDE3-LASFDE3
    .long L$set$3
LASFDE3:
    .long   LASFDE3-EH_frame1
    .quad   LFB3-.
    .set L$set$4,LFE3-LFB3
    .quad L$set$4
    .byte   0
    .byte   0x4
    .set L$set$5,LCFI0-LFB3
    .long L$set$5
    .byte   0xe
    .byte   0x10
    .byte   0x4
    .set L$set$6,LCFI1-LCFI0
    .long L$set$6
    .byte   0xe
    .byte   0x8
    .align 3
LEFDE3:
    .constructor
    .destructor
    .align 1
    .subsections_via_symbols

The dot product is 385, and it seems that it was calculated at compile time, but I cannot seem to find exactly where. I suspect it is somewhere in the following assembler segment:

    movl    $1, %eax
    movsd   LC0(%rip), %xmm0
    call    _printf
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    addq    $8, %rsp
LCFI1:
    ret
LFE3:
    .literal8
    .align 3
LC0:
    .long   0
    .long   1081610240
    .section __TEXT,__eh_frame,coalesced,no_toc+strip_static_syms+live_support

My (very, very limited) understanding of assembly, would tell me that the dot product was calculated by the compiler and placed in a register (LC0). Then the instruction movsd LC0(%rip), %xmm0 places the value in a string, and calls printf on the resulting, formatted string.

Is this the case? Is the actual number 385 included somewhere in this output, or is it calculated elsewhwere?

Thank you!

EDIT:

In case anybody wonders how the assembly produced by gfortran looks like, I am attaching it below. Notice that even though is known at compile time, and I'm using Fortran's intrinsic dot_product operator, the generated assembly is substantially larger (130 lines vs. 90 lines in the C++ version), and it seems that the optimizer is not able to reduce the operation.

Program (notice that I am using the intrinsic, built-in dot_product operator):

PROGRAM MAIN
  REAL(8), DIMENSION(10):: X = (/1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10/)
  REAL(8), DIMENSION(10):: Y = (/1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10/)
  PRINT "(A, E23.16)", "x.y = ", DOT_PRODUCT(X, Y)
ENDPROGRAM MAIN

Assembly (gfortran -S -O3 myprogram.cpp using gcc 4.7.2 on OS X 10.7.4 x86_64-apple-darwin11.4.2)

    .cstring
LC0:
    .ascii "dotproduct-intrinsic.f90\0"
    .const
LC1:
    .ascii "(A, E23.16)"
LC2:
    .ascii "x.y = "
    .text
    .align 4,0x90
_MAIN__:
LFB0:
    leaq    LC0(%rip), %rax
    subq    $504, %rsp
LCFI0:
    movq    %rax, 24(%rsp)
    leaq    16(%rsp), %rdi
    leaq    LC1(%rip), %rax
    movl    $5, 32(%rsp)
    movq    %rax, 88(%rsp)
    movl    $11, 96(%rsp)
    movl    $4096, 16(%rsp)
    movl    $6, 20(%rsp)
    call    __gfortran_st_write
    leaq    16(%rsp), %rdi
    movl    $6, %edx
    leaq    LC2(%rip), %rsi
    call    __gfortran_transfer_character_write
    leaq    8(%rsp), %rsi
    movl    $8, %edx
    movabsq $4645480607818711040, %rax
    leaq    16(%rsp), %rdi
    movq    %rax, 8(%rsp)
    call    __gfortran_transfer_real_write
    leaq    16(%rsp), %rdi
    call    __gfortran_st_write_done
    addq    $504, %rsp
LCFI1:
    ret
LFE0:
    .section __TEXT,__text_startup,regular,pure_instructions
    .align 4
    .globl _main
_main:
LFB1:
    subq    $8, %rsp
LCFI2:
    call    __gfortran_set_args
    leaq    _options.3.1864(%rip), %rsi
    movl    $8, %edi
    call    __gfortran_set_options
    call    _MAIN__
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    addq    $8, %rsp
LCFI3:
    ret
LFE1:
    .const
    .align 5
_options.3.1864:
    .long   68
    .long   1023
    .long   0
    .long   0
    .long   1
    .long   1
    .long   0
    .long   1
    .section __TEXT,__eh_frame,coalesced,no_toc+strip_static_syms+live_support
EH_frame1:
    .set L$set$0,LECIE1-LSCIE1
    .long L$set$0
LSCIE1:
    .long   0
    .byte   0x1
    .ascii "zR\0"
    .byte   0x1
    .byte   0x78
    .byte   0x10
    .byte   0x1
    .byte   0x10
    .byte   0xc
    .byte   0x7
    .byte   0x8
    .byte   0x90
    .byte   0x1
    .align 3
LECIE1:
LSFDE1:
    .set L$set$1,LEFDE1-LASFDE1
    .long L$set$1
LASFDE1:
    .long   LASFDE1-EH_frame1
    .quad   LFB0-.
    .set L$set$2,LFE0-LFB0
    .quad L$set$2
    .byte   0
    .byte   0x4
    .set L$set$3,LCFI0-LFB0
    .long L$set$3
    .byte   0xe
    .byte   0x80,0x4
    .byte   0x4
    .set L$set$4,LCFI1-LCFI0
    .long L$set$4
    .byte   0xe
    .byte   0x8
    .align 3
LEFDE1:
LSFDE3:
    .set L$set$5,LEFDE3-LASFDE3
    .long L$set$5
LASFDE3:
    .long   LASFDE3-EH_frame1
    .quad   LFB1-.
    .set L$set$6,LFE1-LFB1
    .quad L$set$6
    .byte   0
    .byte   0x4
    .set L$set$7,LCFI2-LFB1
    .long L$set$7
    .byte   0xe
    .byte   0x10
    .byte   0x4
    .set L$set$8,LCFI3-LCFI2
    .long L$set$8
    .byte   0xe
    .byte   0x8
    .align 3
LEFDE3:
    .subsections_via_symbols

Edit 2

Thanks to @JerryCoffin's answer, I am able to verify that, indeed, the bit pattern

LC0:
    .long   0
    .long   1081610240

found in the assembly output corresponds to the number 385.

I used the exact same program provided by @JerryCoffin, namely:

#include <stdio.h>


    #pragma pack(1)
    struct x {
        long x, y;
    };    

    int main() { 
        x v = {0, 1081610240};

        printf("%f\n", *(double *)&v);
        return 0;
    }

with the only caveat that I had to compile it using 32 bits target: g++ verification.cpp -m32.

share|improve this question
    
"it seems that it was calculated at compile time": what makes you assume that? –  Andy Prowl Jan 26 '13 at 0:37
    
@AndyProwl: everything is known at compile time (the preprocessor and compiler will reduce the template recursion to a simple operation before generating the assembly). The optimizer could actually perform the calculation. Also, I cannot find my original data arrays in the assembly output ;) –  Arrieta Jan 26 '13 at 0:40
    
the template recursion will be inlined, yes, but I doubt access to the data will be performed at compile-time if you don't use constexpr. I am no compiler expert though, so I'm mostly thinking aloud. Would also like to know the answer to this question –  Andy Prowl Jan 26 '13 at 0:43
    
The assembly output for your gfortran shows a similar capability for evaluation of the type conversion and dot product at compile time (in fact, the current Fortran standard requires that compilers be able to do this). Have a close look at the rather unusual large number being loaded into rax by the movabsq instruction. Note there are semantic differences in your "print" statements between the two languages, and that most of the gfortran assembly output is not associated with your program per-se. –  IanH Jan 27 '13 at 21:07
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes -- this:

LC0:
    .long   0
    .long   1081610240

Is the bit pattern for a double with the value 3851. So what's happening is that this:

LCFI0:
    movl    $1, %eax
    movsd   LC0(%rip), %xmm0
    call    _printf

...is loading that value into an XMM register, then calling printf to print it out. I can't say for sure, but if I had to guess, I would say the 1 is telling it that it's passing one parameter to be printed out.


1In case you care to verify that, try this:

#include <stdio.h>

#pragma pack(1)
struct x {
    long x, y;
};    

int main() { 
    x v = {0, 1081610240};

    printf("%f\n", *(double *)&v);
    return 0;
}

Officially, of course, this is non-portable, etc., but with the same compiler on the same machine, chances are about 99% that you'll get the same output I did -- 385.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah! Thanks! That is exactly the answer I was looking for! –  Arrieta Jan 26 '13 at 0:50
    
+1 and admiration. I wish I could have an idea of how you could figure that out in the first place. –  Andy Prowl Jan 26 '13 at 0:51
1  
@AndyProwl: I've spent quite a bit of my career reading disassembled code to figure out whether it infringes on patents. After 20 years of it, something like this isn't much of a challenge. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 26 '13 at 0:57
1  
@JerryCoffin: still enough to impress me. –  Andy Prowl Jan 26 '13 at 0:58
    
I unfortunately cannot replicate the 385 compiling the program... ;( –  Arrieta Jan 26 '13 at 1:00
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