Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am creating a new Traveling Application in iOS, this application is highly dependent on Maps and will include two Maps.

  1. My first Map will work when the user has a strong Network Signal (Apple Maps).
  2. My second Map will be used when their isn't any Network or really Low signal (Offline MapBox).

Why do I have two different maps in one Application? My Application is a Direction App, so when the user has really low network or none it will go to the offline Map MapBox. Also the Apple Maps will have Yelp integration and not the offline Map MapBox.

So my Question: How can I detect the network signal in WiFi, 4G Lte, and 3G. Thanks.

MapBox Offline Image

share|improve this question
    
I don't believe there is an API for that. See stackoverflow.com/questions/2959567/iphone-signal-strength. But do you really care about signal strength? Why not just look at bandwidth? Just try to download a file of a known size, and if it either fails or takes more than 0.x seconds to download, then use your offline maps? –  Rob Jan 29 '13 at 2:55
    
Could you give some code to detect Bandwidth. –  iProgrammed Jan 29 '13 at 3:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 20 down vote accepted
+50

My original thought was to download a small file of a fixed size, and see how long it takes, but also cancel it and declare failure if it takes too long (so you don't wait forever for a response):

@interface ViewController () <NSURLConnectionDataDelegate>

@property (nonatomic, strong) NSURLConnection *connection; // we'll use presence or existence of this connection to determine if download is done
@property (nonatomic) NSUInteger length;                   // the numbers of bytes downloaded from the server thus far
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSDate *startTime;           // when did the download start

@end

static CGFloat const kMinimumMegabytesPerSecond = 20;
static CGFloat const kMaximumElapsedTime = 2.0;

@implementation ViewController

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    [self testDownloadSpeed];
}

- (void)testDownloadSpeed
{
    NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString:@"http://insert.your.site.here/yourfile"];
    NSURLRequest *request = [NSURLRequest requestWithURL:url];
    self.startTime = [NSDate date];
    self.length = 0;
    self.connection = [NSURLConnection connectionWithRequest:request delegate:self];

    double delayInSeconds = kMaximumElapsedTime;
    dispatch_time_t popTime = dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, (int64_t)(delayInSeconds * NSEC_PER_SEC));
    dispatch_after(popTime, dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^(void){
        if (self.connection)
        {
            [self.connection cancel];
            self.connection = nil;
            [self useOffline];
        }
    });
}

- (CGFloat)determineMegabytesPerSecond
{
    NSTimeInterval elapsed;

    if (self.startTime)
    {
        elapsed = [[NSDate date] timeIntervalSinceDate:self.startTime];
        return self.length / elapsed / 1024;
    }

    return -1;
}

- (void)useOnline
{
    // use your MKMapView; I'm just updating a text field with the status

    self.statusLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"successful @ %.1f mb/sec", [self determineMegabytesPerSecond]];
}

- (void)useOffline
{
    // use your offline maps; I'm just updating a text field with the status

    self.statusLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"unsuccessful @ %.1f mb/sec", [self determineMegabytesPerSecond]];
}

#pragma mark - NSURLConnectionDataDelegate methods

- (void)connection:(NSURLConnection *)connection didReceiveResponse:(NSURLResponse *)response
{
    // I actually want my download speed to factor out latency, so I'll reset the 
    // starting timer when the download commences

    self.startTime = [NSDate date];
}

- (void)connection:(NSURLConnection *)connection didFailWithError:(NSError *)error
{
    if (self.connection)
    {
        self.connection = nil;
        [self useOffline];
    }
}

- (void)connectionDidFinishLoading:(NSURLConnection *)connection
{
    self.connection = nil;

    if ([self determineMegabytesPerSecond] >= kMinimumMegabytesPerSecond)
        [self useOnline];
    else
        [self useOffline];
}

- (void)connection:(NSURLConnection *)connection didReceiveData:(NSData *)data
{
    // you don't need to do anything with the downloaded data; 
    // just keep track of # of bytes

    self.length += [data length];
}

@end

The choice of kMinimumMegabytesPerSecond and kMaximumElapsedTime is obviously up to you. The first measures bandwidth, and the second also factors in latency. The thing is, to do accurate bandwidth test, you need to do prolonged and repeated downloads. But you also want to (a) to not use of too much of the user's data plan; nor (b) take too long. So, in my test, I was just downloading a file of 100kb and set my criteria to be loose enough to permit for a certain amount of variation in both latency and download speed, but you should play around with the values and use whatever suits you.


Having done that, in retrospect, I don't like spending time or bandwidth downloading something that has no practical benefit to the app. So, as an alternative, I might suggest a far more pragmatic approach: Why don't you just try to open a MKMapView and see how long it takes to finish downloading the map? If it fails or if it takes more than a certain amount of time, then switch to your offline map. Again, there is quite a bit of variability here (not only because network bandwidth and latency, but also because some map images appear to be cached), so make sure to set a kMaximumElapsedTime to be large enough to handle all the reasonable permutations of a successful connection (i.e., don't be too aggressive in using a low value).

To do this, just make sure to set your view controller to be the delegate of the MKMapView. And then you can do:

@interface ViewController () <MKMapViewDelegate>
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSDate *startDate;
@end

static CGFloat const kMaximumElapsedTime = 5.0;

@implementation ViewController

// insert the rest of your implementation here

#pragma mark - MKMapViewDelegate methods

- (void)mapViewWillStartLoadingMap:(MKMapView *)mapView
{
    NSDate *localStartDate = [NSDate date];
    self.startDate = localStartDate;

    double delayInSeconds = kMaximumElapsedTime;
    dispatch_time_t popTime = dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, (int64_t)(delayInSeconds * NSEC_PER_SEC));
    dispatch_after(popTime, dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^(void){
        // Check to see if either:
        //   (a) start date property is not nil (because if it is, we 
        //       finished map download); and
        //   (b) start date property is the same as the value we set
        //       above, as it's possible this map download is done, but
        //       we're already in the process of downloading the next
        //       map.

        if (self.startDate && self.startDate == localStartDate)
        {
            [[[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:nil
                                        message:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"Map timed out after %.1f", delayInSeconds]
                                       delegate:nil
                              cancelButtonTitle:@"OK"
                              otherButtonTitles:nil] show];
        }
    });
}

- (void)mapViewDidFailLoadingMap:(MKMapView *)mapView withError:(NSError *)error
{
    self.startDate = nil;

    [[[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:nil
                                message:@"Online map failed"
                               delegate:nil
                      cancelButtonTitle:@"OK"
                      otherButtonTitles:nil] show];
}

- (void)mapViewDidFinishLoadingMap:(MKMapView *)mapView
{
    NSTimeInterval elapsed = [[NSDate date] timeIntervalSinceDate:self.startDate];
    self.startDate = nil;
    self.statusLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%.1f seconds", elapsed];
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I'd also marry the above with Reachability. –  Rob Jan 29 '13 at 16:50
    
Could you give a website I could use in these piece of Code: NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString:@"insert.your.site.here/yourfile"]; –  iProgrammed Jan 29 '13 at 22:30
1  
@iProgrammed 1. to do this, you really need your own web site you can upload the file to. If you don't have your own site for this, you shouldn't be doing this technique (you wouldn't be a good netizen to by hitting some third party web server). 2. to create a file, being an "emacs" guy back in my text editor days, I'd go to the Terminal command line, type in emacs dummy.txt, press ctrl-u, type in a number (e.g. 100000) and then press the x key to repeat x 100000 times. Then press ctrl-x ctrl-s to save the file, and ctrl-x ctrl-c to quit emacs. 3. Upload the file onto your web server. –  Rob Jan 29 '13 at 22:45
1  
Thanks for your Help: 50+ –  iProgrammed Jan 29 '13 at 22:50

I believe a google search will help.

Look out for the following thread on StackOverflow—

iOS wifi scan, signal strength

iPhone signal strength

So, I don't think you can still do this without using private APIs.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.