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This is my first time asking a question on here, and I'm hoping I get an answer or an idea that will help me.

I am drawing a large image and scaling it down with drawImage(). I then immediately draw another image with drawImage() that I expect to be drawn on top of the previous one (second). The problem is that drawImage returns immediately, even if it takes ~50 ms to scale and render the first image. Most of the time the second image ends up underneath the first one because it's painted first while the big first one is being processed. Basically is there anyway to force drawImage() to block until it's done, or to somehow check when it has completed?

I'm aware of the ImageObserver parameter, which works fine when downloading an image from the Internet or something, but when using an already-loaded BufferedImage, it never fires ImageUpdate() just after scaling and drawing. Basically since the first image is already "loaded" it never contacts the ImageObserver, it just takes like ~50 ms in it's own thread to process, never notifying when it completes.

Does anyone know how to either force it to block or wait until it's completely done scaling and blitting an image? And obviously using Thread.sleep(xx) is a complete hack and not viable due to differences between computer speeds. All this rendering is happened on the Event thread inside the paint(Graphics g) method.

Thanks!

EDIT: The following is code I currently have to give you an idea of the issue:

public void paint(Graphics window)
{
    window.setColor(Color.WHITE);
    window.fillRect(0, 0, Settings.width * Settings.aaFactor, Settings.height * Settings.aaFactor);

    Graphics2D window2D = (Graphics2D) window;
    window2D.setRenderingHint(RenderingHints.KEY_INTERPOLATION, RenderingHints.VALUE_INTERPOLATION_BICUBIC);
    window2D.drawImage(this.image, 0, 0, Settings.width, Settings.height, null);

    try
    {
        Thread.sleep(50);
    }
    catch (InterruptedException e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    window2D.drawImage(this.image2, 0, 0, null);

    repaint();
}

EDIT 2: To better explain the problem I'm talking about, I made some sample code that does better what I'm trying to explain. Run it and you will see it flickering where sometimes the first image is on bottom (like it's supposed to be), but most of the time it will be one top (second), which is wrong. Just change the File paths to a small image and a large image.

public class Main extends Applet implements ImageObserver
{
    private BufferedImage imageA;
    private BufferedImage imageB;

    @Override
    public void init()
    {
        try
        {
            this.imageA = ImageIO.read(new File("C:\\LargeImage.jpg"));
            this.imageB = ImageIO.read(new File("C:\\SmallImage.jpg"));
        }
        catch (IOException e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void update(Graphics g)
    {
        paint(g);
    }

    @Override
    public void paint(Graphics g)
    {
        Graphics2D w = (Graphics2D) g;
        w.setRenderingHint(RenderingHints.KEY_INTERPOLATION, RenderingHints.VALUE_INTERPOLATION_BICUBIC);
        w.drawImage(this.imageA, 0, 0, 50, 50, this);// This takes a while to do (scaling down and drawing)...
        w.drawImage(this.imageB, 10, 10, null);// While this is drawn quickly, before A is done.

        repaint();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean imageUpdate(Image img, int infoflags, int x, int y, int width, int height)
    {
        System.out.println("ImageObserver fired, done drawing image.  NEVER CALLED!");
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I can't determine when Java will actually render the out put of the Graphics object. The one thing you can sure of is it won't happen until AFTER the paint method returns, so the Thread.sleep is doing nothing other then slowing down your program. If you are painting through a Component of some kind, pass it to the drawInage method as the ImageObserver & let it update itself when it's ready. The other choice is to scale the image in a background thread –  MadProgrammer Jan 26 '13 at 2:18
    
public class Main extends Applet.. That won't work here since this applet used images that are not on the local disks. Applets are also harder for people to run than applications. I suggest you post a frame based SSCCE that either hot-links to images or generates them in code. –  Andrew Thompson Jan 26 '13 at 3:01

2 Answers 2

It is impossible to know when Swing will actually render the contents of a Graphics object to the screen. What is know is it won't happen until AFTER the paint methods return (as the Graphics object hasn't been finalised for rendering until it does).

What you should do is let the Component you are painting to make the decision as to when something needs to updated, this is the way it was designed...(Component implements ImageObserver)

The below example continuously re-scales the master background image as the frame is resized

enter image description here

public class TestPaint03 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TestPaint03();
    }

    public TestPaint03() {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (Exception ex) {
                }

                JFrame frame = new JFrame("Test");
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                frame.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
                frame.add(new PaintPane());
                frame.pack();
                frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }

    public class PaintPane extends JPanel {

        private BufferedImage background;
        private BufferedImage foreground;
        private Image scaled;

        public PaintPane() {

            try {
                background = ImageIO.read(new File("/path/to/background/image));
                foreground = ImageIO.read(new File("path/to/foreground/image"));
            } catch (Exception e) {
            }

        }

        @Override
        public void invalidate() {
            scaled = null;
            super.invalidate();
        }

        @Override
        public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
            return new Dimension(200, 200);
        }

        @Override
        protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
            super.paintComponent(g);

            if (background != null) {

                if (scaled == null) {
                    int size = Math.min(getWidth(), getHeight());
                    scaled = background.getScaledInstance(-1, size, Image.SCALE_SMOOTH);
                }

                int x = (getWidth() - scaled.getWidth(this)) / 2;
                int y = (getHeight() - scaled.getHeight(this)) / 2;
                g.drawImage(scaled, x, y, this);

                x = (getWidth() - foreground.getWidth()) / 2;
                y = (getHeight() - foreground.getHeight()) / 2;
                g.drawImage(foreground, x, y, this);

            }
        }
    }
}

While I'm sure you have your reasons, personally I would avoid Applet in favor of JApplet and in fact, I would personally avoid applets or together. I started my career coding applets, they are simply a pain, especially when all you're trying to do is test an idea.

share|improve this answer

The last argument to drawImage (where you pass null) is an ImageObserver. If you provide your own implementation of that interface (see JavaDoc), you will be informed when the image has been actually drawn.

share|improve this answer
    
I've done this but that does not work. As I tried explaining in the second paragraph, I have implemented ImageObserver and the method imageUpdate() and I had it System.out.println("Fired"); if it was called, but it was never called. And I changed the final drawImage() parameter from null to this. –  Jacob Jan 26 '13 at 1:42
    
But if the image is already precomputed and ready to be drawn, drawImage returns true (and the ImageObserver will not be notified). Did you check for that? And did drawImage really return true immediately without actually drawing the image? –  jarnbjo Jan 26 '13 at 1:48
    
Exactly the problem. It does return true (because it's "loaded" as in read-in and converted), but it still returns immediately even though it takes like ~100 ms to scale it down and blit it. By that time the second small image has already been blitted underneat (incorrectly). imageUpdate() is never called. –  Jacob Jan 26 '13 at 1:55
    
There, I added a second example that you can copy/paste and it will demonstrate the problem. And drawImage() does always return immediately. –  Jacob Jan 26 '13 at 2:01
    
In your second example, you invoke repaint() at the end of your paint method, triggering an immediate repaint and hence an endless repaint loop. The flickering makes it impossible for me to see which image is drawn first. If I remove the repaint invocation, the first image is scaled and drawn first and then the small image on top of it (as expected). The first invocation of drawImage takes about 130ms, the second 0.06ms. Tested with Oracle JDK 1.7.0_07 on Windows. –  jarnbjo Jan 26 '13 at 2:14

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