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Site in question: http://khill.mhostiuckproductions.com/siteLSSBoilerPlate/

If you test the above link in IE7 (I am using IE9 with browsermode and browser compatability for IE7), there is a positioning problem with the subnavs.

Hover over about us, then hover over home, and then go back to About us. You will see the sub-nav has moved to the right by the width of the LI above it.

This is coded purely in CSS. This works perfectly in all browsers except for IE7, I would like to keep this working within CSS, without any Javascript fixes.

I also have a z-index issue, any ideas on these two issues?

Here is the CSS code that handles the main UL and LI, as well as the CSS that handles the first Subnav. (note the secondary subnav under "Michael" works as intended).

***Note that the class .main-nav is applied to the first UL that handles the horizontal bar. The class .main-sub-nav is applied to the UL that holds the subnav LI's Michael, Kenny etc. under the About us menu.

nav .main-nav {
    position: absolute; /* allows us to absolute position the subnavs */
    display: block;
    width: 100%;
    height: 40px; /*height of inner nav for white border */
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0;
    border: 1px solid #fff; /* Inner white border */
    -moz-border-radius: 5px; /*rounded edges */
    -webkit-border-radius: 5px;
    border-radius: 5px;
}

nav ul > li {
    display: inline-block;
    height: 40px;
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0 0 0 -4px;
}

/* MAIN NAV SUBNAV STYLES */

.main-sub-nav { /* BASIC STYLING PLUS HIDE */
    position: absolute;
    display: none;
    z-index: 1;
    width: 200px;
    height: auto;
    top: 100%;
    border: 1px solid #d4d4d4;
    background: #f6f6f6;
}

nav ul > li:hover > .main-sub-nav { /* ON HOVER MAKE SUB-NAV VISIBLE */
    display: block;
}

nav ul li .main-sub-nav li {
    position: relative;
    height: 40px;
    display: block;
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0;
    border-top: 1px solid #fff;
    border-right: none;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #f2f2f2;
    border-left: 1px solid #fff;
}
share|improve this question
    
Have I stumped everyone? lol –  Michael Jan 26 '13 at 6:38
1  
Out of curiosity, why are you targeting IE7? Every platform that IE7 runs on is also capable of running IE8 (XP, Vista, Win7). IE7's usage is actually less than IE6's. –  Dai Jan 26 '13 at 9:47
    
I just want compatability across all browsers. There are still people who use IE7. –  Michael Jan 29 '13 at 21:17
    
There are still people who use Netscape Navigator 4 (surprisingly). That doesn't mean it's cost-justifiable to accommodate them. –  Dai Jan 29 '13 at 21:25
    
Yet something as simple as a positioning fix isn't cost-justifiable. I've spent 45 minutes trying to figure it out myself and 10 minutes fixing it from the comment below. The only problem now is a zindex/overflow issue. Perfectly cost-justifiable, especially when most of my clients are medium to large home grown american businesses who are all using Windows XP with IE7. –  Michael Jan 29 '13 at 21:50
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The thing is that you are incorrectly using positioning.

Try this approach. I have commented few changes.

.row.margin-bottom-15.nav-container { /* Remove overflow:hidden; so your dropdowns will be shown when they overflow. */}

nav .main-nav {
    /* removed position:absolute; */
    display: block;
    width: 100%;
    height: 40px;
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0;
    border: 1px solid #fff;
    -moz-border-radius: 5px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 5px;
    border-radius: 5px;
}

nav ul > li {
    position: relative; /* Add position:relative; so you can absolute position dropdowns */
    display: inline-block;
    height: 40px;
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0 0 0 -4px;
}



.main-sub-nav { 
    position: absolute;
    display: none;
    z-index: 1;
    width: 200px;
    height: auto;
    top: 100%;
    left: 0;
    border: 1px solid #d4d4d4;
    background: #f6f6f6;
}

nav ul > li:hover > .main-sub-nav { 
    display: block;
}

nav ul li .main-sub-nav li {
    position: relative;
    height: 40px;
    display: block;
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0;
    border-top: 1px solid #fff;
    border-right: none;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #f2f2f2;
    border-left: 1px solid #fff;
}

Let me know if it helped.

share|improve this answer
    
I made your changes, the subnavs still appear to work but there seems to be a z-index issue now, and I haven't been able to localize where the issue is. Any further ideas? –  Michael Jan 29 '13 at 21:12
    
Actually, I made some more changes since I posted this, and it's completely ganked in IE7 now. I'll need some time to put it back to where it was. –  Michael Jan 29 '13 at 21:29
    
OK. I have what I did that broke it restored. I have implemented your above changes, and my postioning is fixed. I have a z-index/overflow issue now across every browser, and I can't identify what needs to be changed, I feel like i've tried every combination possible. –  Michael Jan 29 '13 at 21:35
    
Sorry, wasn't around on Stack for few days. Have you fixed it meanwhile? On IE7 I see main image weirdly aligned. Remove the .col-12 .slider-center section wrapping that image and it should work ok. –  Marko Franceković Jan 30 '13 at 20:36
1  
Checked out a bit, when I removed position: relative; from .col-12 class it worked ok in IE7. Try it. Generally you are using too much positioning without the actual need for it and than things get mixed up. –  Marko Franceković Jan 30 '13 at 22:09
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