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Alright, so a way with getting around with multiple-inheritance in C# is through the use of interfaces. Though this is a fair solution, it still requires you to always retype the methods within an interface that aren't really supposed to change between the classes.

For example, if I have a method .foo() as part of the interface Adabo that is always found to do the same thing (say, it loops 10 times), but at some point of development I find out that I need to make a change to it (say, it is actually supposed to loop 11 times), I'll have to go through each class that inherits from Adabo and change their own .foo() accordingly.

The only thing I want with interfaces is their free pass at multiple-inheritance, frankly. I'm not really interested in their all-abstract premise. Is there a way to get around this?

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you seem to have completely misunderstood interfaces....An Interface is a contract; the implementation is largely irrelevant as far as a consumer of the Interface is concerned. That's the whole point. –  Mitch Wheat Jan 26 '13 at 2:46
    
Well, they are apparently the only way to implement multiple-inheritance in C#, wether this is their function or not (and I'm aware it's not, as you pointed out). If there are alternatives, I'd sincerely like to know! –  Mutoh Jan 26 '13 at 2:47
3  
Cases where multiple-inheritance might get you through are usually better served by a different design pattern. –  itsme86 Jan 26 '13 at 2:54
    
@itsme86 Well, I'd have a hard time adapting my current idea, but I cannot help but agree. –  Mutoh Jan 26 '13 at 3:00
    
If you want multiple inheritance that much, I suggest you look into using a language that supports it, instead of trying to jimmy it into a language that doesn't support it. –  Igby Largeman Jan 26 '13 at 3:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Without context, this is a difficult question to answer. Depending on the context, different solutions will be more appropriate than others.

Firstly, as noted elsewhere - interfaces do not specify implementation, they specify only a contract. The implementation will be contained in some base class. A class can implement many interfaces, but the real question you have (I believe) is; "how can I implement many interfaces in a C# class whilst limiting code duplication, given that multiple inheritance is not possible?".

There are many options, and the context is important. However, some general principles which you could research further;

  • Object composition; having one class made up of several others. For example, a class car class could comprise several wheels, an engine, doors, etc. And the wheel class could be reused on a class Bus
  • Cross cutting concerns/Aspect oriented programming; more appropriate when it is a particular behaviour that you want to duplicate, rather than a concrete concept. The canonical example is tracing/logging; you want all methods to log without having to duplicate the logging calls everywhere. There are excellent tools to support this in C# such as PostSharp, but this approach requires a different design mentality to 'traditional' OO design.
  • Extension Methods; this is a .NET construct that be quite handy when you want to implement a behaviour for a type without actually modifying that type. The best example here is LINQ; all implementations of IEnumerable can use LINQ methods without actually directly implementing anything.

As I stated, context is important, and without it, these are just general pointers that might serve you in some further research.

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a way with getting around with multiple-inheritance in C# is through the use of interfaces

Not true. Classes implement interfaces, they do not inherit from them. There is no way to implement multiple inheritance in C# (or any other managed language)

One way to get close to multiple inheritance is with Aggregation - Create a "wrapper" that just passes function calls back to the sub-parts.

if I have a method .foo() as part of the interface Adabo that is always found to do the same thing (say, it loops 10 times)

Interfaces don't do anything - they just define which methods/propertied need to be implemented by the concrete class.

If your question is not just theoretical then I would encourage you to post some examples of where you think multiple inheritance is valuable. There may be another pattern that gives you what you want.

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it still requires you to always retype the methods within an interface that aren't really supposed to change between the classes

Not at all. You simply implement the interface on a base class, implement the method that is common across all the classes that will implement the interface, and then declare the remainder as abstract - which forces the dervivatives to implement it.

public interface MyInterface
{
    void SomeCommonMethod(object whatever);

    void SomeSpecialisedMethod(int someOtherParameter);
}

public abstract class MyBaseClass : MyInterface
{
    public void SomeCommonMethod(object whatever)
    {
        //do some stuff
    }

    public abstract void SomeSpecialisedMethod(int someOtherParameter);
}

public class SomeSpecialisedClass : MyBaseClass
{
    public override void SomeSpecialisedMethod(int someOtherParameter)
    {
        //do stuff that can't be done in the base class
    }
}

This shows how to avoid endlessly having to "retype" interface implementations in all the classes that need it.

Having said that, using interfaces does not equate to multiple inheritance. In the early days of C# there was much talk about this, and the general consensus was that in real world situations there is actually very little need for multiple inheritance. I personally have only really needed it a couple of times in my career, and in those cases there were adequate workarounds - multiple inheritance simply would have been a cleaner approach.

The only thing I want with interfaces is their free pass at multiple-inheritance

Repeat after me:   There is no multiple inheritance within interfaces either.

One interface can implement several other interfaces and also define its own requirements (contract), but in no case is it inheritance. You can approximate multiple inheritance but you cannot achieve proper multiple inheritance.

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But you cant inherit from 2 abstract classes :-) –  Kugel Jan 26 '13 at 3:09

It seems that you have mixed up several things and got confused. If I understood you correctly, you have an interface, say Adabo which has a method called foo(). Now, you have many classes that implement this method. From what you wrote, I gather that implementation of this method is the same in all those classes, therefore, what bothers you is that when you want to change the implementation, then you need to go and change all of them.

Well, here is your problem. The methods in an interface are for cases where different implementing classes, implement it differently, according their own needs. If it happens that the implementation should be the same for all. Then you have several choices:

  1. Inheritance: through a concrete or abstract class. Place the common method in the parent class, and extend it. If you are saying that child classes already extend some other class. Then your next bet is,

  2. Composition: Place common functionality in a component class and include it in other classes that need to use it. So, instead of interface Adabo, have class Adabo

    class Adabo{

    foo();
    

    }

then in all your child classes have

class childA {

   Adabo a;

   ...
   a.foo();
}

class childB {

   Adabo a;

   ...
   a.foo();
}

class childC {

   Adabo a;

   ...
   a.foo();
}
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