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In Cormen's Introduction to Algorithm's book, I'm attempting to work the following problem:

Show that the solution to the recurrence relation T(n) = T(n-1) + n is O(n2 ) using substitution

(There wasn't an initial condition given, this is the full text of the problem)

However, I can't seem to find out the correct process. The textbook only briefly touches on it, and most sites I've searched seem to assume I already know how. If someone could give me a simple, step by step guide, or even a link to one, I would appreciate it.

For kicks, here's my attempt so far:

T(n) <= c(n^2)
       <= c(n-1)^2 + n
       <= c(n^2 -2n +1) + n (which I'm pretty sure is not < c(n^2))

Thanks again.

UPDATE: Here's an example of the method I'm trying to accomplish, to avoid confusion.

Prove the solution is O(nlog(n))
T(n) = 2T([n/2]) + n
The substitution method requires us to prove that T(n) <= cn*lg(n) for a choice of constant c > 0. Assume this bound holds for all positive m < n, where m = [n/2], yielding T([n/2]) <= c[n/2]*lg([n/2]). Substituting this into the recurrence yields the following:
T(n) <= 2(c[n/2]*lg([n/2])) + n
       <= cn*lg(n/2) + n
       = cn*lg(n) - cn*lg(2) + n
       = cn*lg(n) - cn + n
       <= cn*lg(n)
where the last step holds as long as c >= 1


I can follow this logic just fine, but when I attempt to duplicate the steps in the problem above, I get stuck.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Salvador Dali, SwiftArchitect, Skynet, Sweeper, Chris J Dec 15 '15 at 8:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
The homework tag is deprecated. – Alexey Frunze Jan 26 '13 at 4:15
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I guess this is supposed to be induction?

So base case n=1 is trivial. Induction case, assume n>1. (*) Suppose T(n-1) is O((n-1)2)=O(n2). Show that T(n) is also O(n2).

 T(n) = T(n-1) + n
      < c (n-1)^2 + n,  assume c>1 wlog
      < c n^2 - 2cn + c + n
      < c n^2 - (2c - 1)n + c
      < c n^2

for n > 1, c > 1.

Here is the break out:

First, notice that when c > 1, 2c - 1 > c, so you have

      < c n^2 - (2c - 1)n + c
      < c n^2 - (c)n + c

Next, notice that when n > 1, -(c)n+c = (1-n) c < 0, so you have

      < c n^2 - (c)n + c
      < c n^2

Since there is a constant c such that T(n) < c n^2, clearly T(n) is O(n2).

Is that roughly along the line of what you want? Had to edit it a bunch of times to fix edge cases.

share|improve this answer
    
I believe it is, how did you cancel into the last line, though? Your next to last line is as far as I could get. – user2012892 Jan 29 '13 at 22:25
    
basically, it's from the fact that n>1 and c>1. added the explanation. you're welcome :p – thang Jan 29 '13 at 22:28
    
So, since 2c - 1 > c for c >1, you substitute c in for 2c - 1? Likewise for replacing (1-n)c with 0? – user2012892 Jan 29 '13 at 23:24
    
i didn't just randomly substitute. By substituting, it makes the whole expression, namely c n^2 - (2c - 1)n + c, larger. Why? Because I've made a minus term, namely - (2c - 1)n, smaller by the substitution. This lets me keep the < inequality. This is because if A < B and I've created a C such that B < C, then I can conclude that A < C. And likewise for (1-n)c and 0. – thang Jan 29 '13 at 23:32
    
FYI: to be correct, all the < should be <=, but it just looks ugly and LaTeX symbols don't work. – thang Jan 29 '13 at 23:33

Is that a pure math problem?

From T(n) = T(n-1) + n, we have:

T(n)   - T(n-1) = n
T(n-1) - T(n-2) = n-1
T(n-2) - T(n-3) = n-2
...
...
T(2)   - T(1)   = 2
T(1)   - T(0)   = 1

Summing all above equations gives us:

T(n) - T(0) = 1 + 2 + ... + (n-1) + n = n * (n+1) / 2 = O(n ^ 2)

We're done.

UPDATE (I'm not sure if this is called substitution as the OP required):

T(n) = T(n-1) + n
= T(n-2) + (n-1) + n
= T(n-3) + (n-2) + (n-1) + n
= ... 
= T(1) + (2 + 3 + ... + n)
= T(0) + (1 + 2 + ... + n)
= T(0) +  n * (n+1) / 2
= O(n ^ 2)
share|improve this answer
    
That's appreciated, but I believe that is iteration, not substitution. That may come in handy on a later problem though, thanks – user2012892 Jan 26 '13 at 3:20
    
I updated my answer, is that what you need? – Hui Zheng Jan 26 '13 at 3:30
    
I believe substitution involves replacing T(N) with, in this case, c(n^2), and using that to prove the relation. Hence my vain attempt above. Your solution seems to involve a method later in the book, called either iteration or solving the recurrence tree. Again, I could be wrong. If I knew I was right, I wouldn't be here :) – user2012892 Jan 26 '13 at 3:41

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