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Consider the following pattern:

class Child
{
public:
    char Foo;

    Child(char foo)
    {
        Foo = foo;
    }
};

class Parent
{
public:
    Child c;

    Parent() : c('A') { }

    const Child& GetChild() const
    {
        return c;
    }
};

// Scenario 1: Works, but useless
int main()
{
    Parent p = Parent();
    Child c = p.GetChild();
    c.Foo = 'B';
    cout << p.c.Foo << endl; // A, wrong
    cout << c.Foo << endl; // B, good
    system("PAUSE");
}

// Scenario 2: Doesn't compile, of course
int main()
{
    Parent p = Parent();
    Child& c = p.GetChild(); // Error
    c.Foo = 'B';
    cout << p.c.Foo << endl; // A, good
    cout << c.Foo << endl; // B, good
    system("PAUSE");
}

The specification is the following:

  • The getter must be defined as const (because it doesn't modify Parent)
  • The reference given by the getter must modify the underlying value

The problem is that:

  • C++ requires the return value of the getter to be const if the getter itself is const (why?)
  • C++ forbids assigning a const value to a reference (logically)

It is very easy to accomplish this using pointers (make the accessor return Child*), but there seems to be a consensus (and rightfully so) that references are advisable, considering they hide the complexity of pointers.

Is there any way to do it? If not, I'll just revert to pointers.

share|improve this question
    
I don't suppose you have a C++11 implementation, and thus can mark the Child c; member variable as mutable and change the getter to just Child& getChild() const { return c; } ? – WhozCraig Jan 26 '13 at 4:37
    
@WhozCraig Is this forbidden / impossible in C++11? – leemes Jan 26 '13 at 4:40
    
It may well (small chance) be UB, I'd have to check, but as I recall the whole point of mutable members was to allow them t be hot even in const-environments. Pretty sure it is legal to do what I posted above. I sure hope its not impossible, because my toolchain is quite-broken if it is. – WhozCraig Jan 26 '13 at 4:42
    
@WhozCraig: That's not a new feature to C++11. – Benjamin Lindley Jan 26 '13 at 4:43
    
@BenjaminLindley mutable memvars have been around prior to 11 ? Jeezors I need to get out more. – WhozCraig Jan 26 '13 at 4:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the returned reference wouldn't be const, the caller could modify the object even if it was const in its own context:

const Parent p = ...
Child & child = p.GetChild(); // valid const call, invalid return type

However, this is only the problem when you are trying to return a member variable which is part of the class itself (which itself is not a pointer). So as you already suggested, making the Child a pointer would be OK. But returning a non-const pointer to a non-pointer Child would result in the same problem...

To illustrate the problem better, consider this memory layout illustration:

Parent:  [Child]

Child:   [char ]

So a parent contains a Child object and no more, so modifying your Parent instance modifies a Child instance, while modifying Parent::c modifies Parent itself.

So you can't return a pointer or a reference to a non-const object (which the this pointer points at in a const member function):

Child& GetChild() const
{
    return c;    // compiler will complain here
}

Would be equal to:

Child& GetChild() const
{
    return this->c;   // compiler will complain here
}

where this is of type const Parent *, which means that this->c is of type const Child &. Returning Child & violates the const-ness.

The getter itself doesn't modify the object, but it allows to circumvent the const-ness within the caller's code, as seen in the code above.

share|improve this answer
    
Good answer. The central point of understanding came from the fact that c, as a "value-type" is actually part of the consted Parent memory block, and not just a reference. Pointers then seem like the logical choice. Or would you have another suggestion for my needs? – Lazlo Jan 26 '13 at 4:44
1  
It seems that you implement a tree data structures. Normally, you use pointers or references to implement them. References can be used if they will point to the same object for their whole lifetime (you can't "reseat" a reference, but you can with a pointer). In both ways, the pointer/reference will be part of your object, but not the object pointed at, so returning such a (modifiable) pointer/reference is valid. – leemes Jan 26 '13 at 4:46

The requirements look conflicting, because if Parent can't be modified, then it means even the Child member also should not be modified.

But if your specifications are relaxed and Child member object can be modified, then a possible solution is to use const_cast.

class Child
{
public:
    char Foo;

    Child(char foo)
    {
        Foo = foo;
    }
};

class Parent
{
public:
    Child c;

    Parent() : c('a') { }

    const Child& GetChild() const
    {
        return c;
    }
};

// Scenario 2: Doesn't compile, of course
int main()
{
    Parent p = Parent();
    Child& c = const_cast<Child &>(p.GetChild()); // No more Error
    c.Foo = 'B';
    std::cout << p.c.Foo << std::endl; // A, good
    std::cout << c.Foo << std::endl; // B, good
    system("PAUSE");
}
share|improve this answer

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