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I noticed a logical inconsistence between Set and SortedSet interfaces in Java.

SortedSet recognizes different objects (by equal() method) as equals if they are the same during the comparison, but it is logically incorrect. Comparing of objects should be responsible only for order of objects.

For example: I can have many products and I want to sort them by price. In this case the SortedSet can’t contain different products with the same price: [“salt”,0.5$], [“milk”, 1$], [“bread”, 1$], [“bananas”, 2$] In example above milk will be replaced by bread. In this case the contract of inherited Set interface will be violated, because unequals objects replace each other. I red JavaDoc of SortedSet and know that this behavior well documented, but I think it is a logical failure.

What is your opinion, maybe you have already similar problems with Set and SortedSet?

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closed as not constructive by EJP, Goran Jovic, Ridcully, Perception, Aleksander Blomskøld Jan 26 '13 at 12:20

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Why so you think it is incorrect to use equals() for equality? And what do you mean by 'unequal objects replace each other'? –  EJP Jan 26 '13 at 7:10
    
Some time I want to sort products by name and other time by date. If I would implement the compare by price directly in Product.equals() method, then I can’t sort products by date. Besides logically products are not equals if they have the same price. –  thinker Jan 26 '13 at 11:01
    
Then you need to use two different Comparators. –  EJP Jan 26 '13 at 22:59

3 Answers 3

It is not a logical failure but a property by design. Note that if your comparison algorithm is consistent with equals, a.compareTo(b) == 0 will be equivalent to a.equals(b).

The javadoc is actually very explicit about it:

The behavior of a sorted set is well-defined even if its ordering is inconsistent with equals; it just fails to obey the general contract of the Set interface.

Is that useful?

That actually gives flexibility where you want to reach a specific behaviour. Let's say for example that you want to put strings in your SortedSet and have them sorted ignoring the case, you can use:

Set<String> set = new TreeSet<> (String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER);

That will achieve the expected result, but this:

set.add("ABC");
set.add("abc");

will only add one string to your set because they will be deemed equal with that specific comparator.

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Thank you for your answer, Some time I want to sort products by name and at other time by date. If I would implement the compare method directly in the product class, and define products to be equals by price then I would not be able to sort products by date. I think “ordering” and “equity” are different aspects and should be separated. –  thinker Jan 26 '13 at 10:42
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The issue with that claim is really that there isn't an efficient way to implement a data structure that separates equality from comparison. –  Louis Wasserman Jan 26 '13 at 17:33
    
Thank you for understanding, I implemented my version of TreeSet based on TreeList from apache collections . It works fine, I tested it with apache collection SetTest. I will publish it with next version of my open-source library. The new TreeSet doesn’t recognize elements as equals by comparator but by equals() method and is in downwardly compatible to normal Set. In that way the new TreeSet implementation will contain the same elements like HashSet, but in ordered style. –  thinker Jan 27 '13 at 9:49

You probably mean the equals() method which is actually available in Object, so every single object type in Java either overrides it or inherits it from Object.

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In Java, generally speaking, two objects a and b are the same if a.equals(b) == true. And a Set, every Set, even SortedSet, has no duplicates, so if you override equals to compare price property, two objects are the same if they have the same price.

I guess you don't override equals method but provide a Comparator to SortedSet to make the ordering. In this case, as said in another answer, if a.compareTo(b) == 0 will be equivalent to a.equals(b).

If you want to order that Set, what you need is another structure, like a List to make the ordering. Something like:

List<Product> list = new ArrayList<Product>(myUnorderedProductsSet);
Collections.sort(list, comparatorByPrice);

Notice that this doesn't gonna double or copy your Product Beans, just would be another structure with references to the same objects in different order. So is not something expensive or avoidable.

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1  
If you want to order that Set, what you need is another structure => Not sure I follow you: a SortedSet, by definition, is... sorted. So there is no need to explicitly sort it again. –  assylias Jan 26 '13 at 8:49
    
Two objects are equals if obj1.equals(obj2)==true and not if objects are compared to each other. For example some time I want to sort products by name and other time by date. If I would implement the compare method directly in the product class and compare products by price, then would not be able to sort products by date. I think “ordering” and “equity” are different aspects and should be separated. –  thinker Jan 26 '13 at 10:51
    
@assylias Yeah thah Set is sorted but also has no repeated elements given the sort criteria you choose just for being a Set. You need another structure that doesn't do that of not keeping repeated elements. For instance, a List. And then you can have keep repeated elements. –  Pedro R. Jan 26 '13 at 16:58
    
@thinker I think I know your point, but Java just doesn't work that way. –  Pedro R. Jan 26 '13 at 16:59
    
Thank you for understanding, I implemented my version of TreeSet based on TreeList from apache collections . It works fine, I tested it with apache collection SetTest. I will publish it with next version of my open-source library. The new TreeSet doesn’t recognize elements as equals by comparator but by equals() method and is in downwardly compatible to normal Set. In that way the new TreeSet implementation will contain the same elements like HashSet, but in ordered style. –  thinker Jan 27 '13 at 9:50

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