Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a repeater looping through a list of objects that are of different types. I'd like to render the objects differently depending on their type. For this I need some kind of control (since I want to avoid using the code-behind) that has a behavior similar to a switch/case statement. Basically it could look like this:

<xxx:TestType Object='<%# Container.DataItem %>'>
    <Case Type="Namespace.ClassX">
        <asp:Label ... />
    </Case>
    <Case Type="Namespace.ClassY">
        <asp:TextBox ... />
    </Case>
    <Default>
        <p>Other</p>
    </Default>
</xxx:TestType>

I've made web controls before, but this is a rather complex one...

  • How do I make it support multiple <Case> elements?
  • Is it possible to implement the <Case Type="..."> elements, or am I limited to attribute-less elements?

I'm guessing I have to make a type for the <Case> elements and somehow specifying it for the main web control?

I'd be grateful for any pointers, links to tutorials, etc!

Alternative

Alternatively, suggest a nicer way of rendering different HTML/ASP.NET controls based on the type of the currently bound object. The first method that popped into my head was this, which I consider (very) ugly:

<asp:PlaceHolder Visible='<%# CheckType(Container, typeof(ClassX)) %>' runat="server">
...
</asp:PlaceHolder>
<asp:PlaceHolder Visible='<%# CheckType(Container, typeof(ClassY)) %>' runat="server">
...
</asp:PlaceHolder>
share|improve this question
    
Reading this: betaforums.silverlight.net/forums/p/20743/280597.aspx it seems pretty trivial. –  Noon Silk Sep 21 '09 at 9:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The MultiView control is the closest thing out-of-the-box in ASP.NET to a C# switch statement.

share|improve this answer
    
MultiView turned out to be the solution with the best functionality/work required ratio in my case. –  Blixt Oct 7 '09 at 8:05

Look at implementing ITemplate interface

  public class Case        
    {

        [PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.Attribute)]
        public string Type { get; set; }

        [PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.InnerDefaultProperty)]
        public ITemplate Template { get; set; }

    }

    public class DeclarativeCase
        : CompositeControl
    {
        [PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.InnerProperty)]
        public List<Case> Cases { get; set; }

        [PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.InnerProperty)]
        public ITemplate Default { get; set; }
    }

<xxx:DeclarativeCase runat="server" ID="test">
  <Cases>
   <xxx:Case Type="Namespace.TypeName">
    <Template>
     <asp:Label ID="Label1" runat="server"></asp:Label>
    </Template>
   </xxx:Case>
  </Cases>

<Default>
 <asp:Label ID="Label2" runat="server"></asp:Label>
</Default>

</xxx:DeclarativeCase>
share|improve this answer

Why don't you ditch the server control and use the C# switch statement. All you need is to wrap it in the code tags.

Another approach is a iteration (for loop). Create an interface with a type property and a render method. Then iterate over the interfaces until you've found the correct type.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah that's the other option... My idea was to make it more... ASP.NET-ish since I'm working with templates after all... –  Blixt Sep 21 '09 at 9:09
    
Also, since I need to check the data bound object, I can't just use the switch statement in code tags, since the Container member is only available in data-binding tags (<%# ... %>) –  Blixt Sep 21 '09 at 9:11
    
It seems like a lot of work... just to avoid the codebehind and embedding code into your HTML. On the bright-side you will learn tons! –  Chuck Conway Sep 21 '09 at 9:12

I had a similar requirement a while ago and I did something similar to:

[ParseChildren(true, "Templates")]
public class TypedRepeater : CompositeDataBoundControl
{
    [
    PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.InnerProperty),
    Browsable(false),
    MergableProperty(false)
    ]
    public TypedTemplateCollection Templates
    {
        get;
    }

protected TypedTemplate GetTemplate(object dataItem) { if (dataItem == null) { return null; } foreach (TypedTemplate template in Templates) { Type itemType = dataItem.GetType(); if (dataItem.IsAssignableFrom(template.Type)) { return template; } } return null; }

    protected TypedTemplateRepeaterItem CreateItem(int index, object dataItem, bool dataBinding)
    {
        TypedTemplateRepeaterItem repeaterItem = new TypedTemplateRepeaterItem();
        if ((!dataBinding) && (ViewState[string.Format("TemplateIxc_{0}", index)] is int))
        {
            int _template = (int)ViewState[string.Format("TemplateIxc_{0}", index)];
            if ((_template >= 0) && (_template < Templates.Count) && (Templates[_template].ItemTemplate != null))
            {
                Templates[_template].ItemTemplate.InstantiateIn(repeaterItem);
            }
            else
            {
                DefaultTemplate.InstantiateIn(repeaterItem);
            }
        }
        else if (dataBinding)
        {
            TypedTemplate template = GetTemplate(dataItem);
            ITemplate itemTemplate = DefaultTemplate;
            if (template != null)
            {
                itemTemplate = template.ItemTemplate;
                ViewState[string.Format("TemplateIxc_{0}", index)] = Templates.IndexOf(template);
            }
            else
            {
                ViewState[string.Format("TemplateIxc_{0}", index)] = -1;
            }

            repeaterItem.DataItem = dataItem;
            repeaterItem.DataItemIndex =
                repeaterItem.DisplayIndex = index;
            itemTemplate.InstantiateIn(repeaterItem);
            repeaterItem.DataBind();
            repeaterItem.DataItem = null;
        }
        return repeaterItem;
    }

    protected override int CreateChildControls(IEnumerable dataSource, bool dataBinding)
    {
        int count = 0;
        if (dataSource != null)
        {
            foreach (object dataItem in dataSource)
            {
                TypedTemplateRepeaterItem repeaterItem = CreateItem(count, dataItem, dataBinding);      
                Controls.Add(repeaterItem);
                count++;
            }
        }
        return count;
    }
}

where TypedTemplateCollection is a StateManagedCollection of a TypedTemplate class:

[ParseChildren(true, "ItemTemplate")]
public class TypedTemplate
{

    public Type Type
    {
        get { return Type.GetType(TypeName); }
    }

    [
    PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.Attribute),
    Browsable(true),
    DefaultValue("")
    ]
    public string TypeName
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    [
    PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.InnerProperty),
    Browsable(true),
    DefaultValue(typeof(ITemplate), null),
    TemplateContainer(typeof(TypedTemplateRepeaterItem))
    ]
    public ITemplate ItemTemplate
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

and TypedTemplateRepeaterItem is:

public class TypedTemplateRepeaterItem : WebControl, INamingContainer, IDataItemContainer
{
    #region IDataItemContainer Members

    public object DataItem
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public int DataItemIndex
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public int DisplayIndex
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    #endregion
}
share|improve this answer

The MSDN site has a simple clear example of templating and it certainly seems like the way to go in your case.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.