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My question is strongly related to this one here. As was posted there, I would like the main thread to wait until the work queue is empty and all tasks have finished. The problem in my situation is, however, that each task may recursively cause new tasks to be submitted for processing. This makes it a little awkward to collect all of those tasks's futures.

Our current solution uses a busy-wait loop to await termination:

        do { //Wait until we are done the processing
      try {
        Thread.sleep(200);
      } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        throw new RuntimeException(e);
      }
    } while (!executor.getQueue().isEmpty()
             || numTasks.longValue() > executor.getCompletedTaskCount());

numTasks is a value that is increased as every new task is created. This works but I think it's not very nice due to the busy waiting. I was wondering whether there is a good way to make the main thread wait synchronously, until being explicitly woken up.

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1  
If you have recursively submitted tasks then a ForkJoinPool can be very helpful if you can use Java 7. –  thkala Jan 26 '13 at 9:56
    
Does the last task know that it is the last one? –  assylias Jan 26 '13 at 9:58
    
I looked at ForkJoinPool, however, I am not sure it's appropriate here. The problem is that all the tasks are independent; they don't need to await each other's completion. The main thread, however, should await completion. –  Eric Jan 26 '13 at 9:58
    
assylias - No, unfortunately it does not. –  Eric Jan 26 '13 at 9:59
    
@Eric: "they don't need" is different than "they should not". Do you need the "parent" tasks to return immediately? –  thkala Jan 26 '13 at 10:06
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8 Answers

Why don't you use a counter? For example:

private AtomicInteger counter = new AtomicInteger(0);

and increment the counter by one just before submitting the task to the queue:

counter.incrementAndGet();

and decrement it by one at the end of the task:

counter.decrementAndGet();

and the check would be something like:

// ...
while (counter.get() > 0);
share|improve this answer
1  
That makes a lot of sense. –  assylias Jan 26 '13 at 10:15
    
That busy loop would be quite expensive though... –  thkala Jan 26 '13 at 10:16
    
@thkala there is a thread-sleep period, as the OP shows. –  Eng.Fouad Jan 26 '13 at 10:17
    
Ah, right. Well, I am facing the same problem as the OP. My current (partial) solution involves atomic counters and notifyAll() being called for a locked object when the counter reaches zero, but I cannot really be certain that it works until I have mathematically verified that all possible sequences are handled correctly :-/ –  thkala Jan 26 '13 at 10:21
1  
Well, it's still a busy wait loop, isn't it? Just a slightly different one... –  Eric Jan 26 '13 at 10:23
show 5 more comments

This one was actually rather interesting problem to solve. I must warn that I have not tested the code fully.

The idea is to simply track the task execution:

  • if task is successfully queued, counter is incremented by one
  • if task is cancelled and it has not been executed, counter is decremented by one
  • if task has been executed, counter is decremented by one

When shutdown is called and there are pending tasks, delegate will not call shutdown on the actual ExecutorService. It will allow queuing new tasks until pending task count reaches zero and shutdown is called on actual ExecutorService.

public class ResilientExecutorServiceDelegate implements ExecutorService {
    private final ExecutorService executorService;
    private final AtomicInteger pendingTasks;
    private final Lock readLock;
    private final Lock writeLock;
    private boolean isShutdown;

    public ResilientExecutorServiceDelegate(ExecutorService executorService) {
        ReadWriteLock readWriteLock = new ReentrantReadWriteLock();
        this.pendingTasks = new AtomicInteger();
        this.readLock = readWriteLock.readLock();
        this.writeLock = readWriteLock.writeLock();
        this.executorService = executorService;
        this.isShutdown = false;
    }

    private <T> T addTask(Callable<T> task) {
        T result;
        boolean success = false;
        // Increment pending tasks counter
        incrementPendingTaskCount();
        try {
            // Call service
            result = task.call();
            success = true;
        } catch (RuntimeException exception) {
            throw exception;
        } catch (Exception exception) {
            throw new RejectedExecutionException(exception);
        } finally {
            if (!success) {
                // Decrement pending tasks counter
                decrementPendingTaskCount();
            }
        }
        return result;
    }

    private void incrementPendingTaskCount() {
        pendingTasks.incrementAndGet();
    }

    private void decrementPendingTaskCount() {
        readLock.lock();
        if (pendingTasks.decrementAndGet() == 0 && isShutdown) {
            try {
                // Shutdown
                executorService.shutdown();
            } catch (Throwable throwable) {
            }
        }
        readLock.unlock();
    }

    @Override
    public void execute(final Runnable task) {
        // Add task
        addTask(new Callable<Object>() {
            @Override
            public Object call() {
                executorService.execute(new Runnable() {
                    @Override
                    public void run() {
                        try {
                            task.run();
                        } finally {
                            decrementPendingTaskCount();
                        }
                    }
                });
                return null;
            }
        });
    }

    @Override
    public boolean awaitTermination(long timeout, TimeUnit unit)
            throws InterruptedException {
        // Call service
        return executorService.awaitTermination(timeout, unit);
    }

    @Override
    public <T> List<Future<T>> invokeAll(Collection<? extends Callable<T>> tasks)
            throws InterruptedException {
        // It's ok to increment by just one
        incrementPendingTaskCount();
        try {
            return executorService.invokeAll(tasks);
        } finally {
            decrementPendingTaskCount();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public <T> List<Future<T>> invokeAll(
            Collection<? extends Callable<T>> tasks, long timeout, TimeUnit unit)
            throws InterruptedException {
        // It's ok to increment by just one
        incrementPendingTaskCount();
        try {
            return executorService.invokeAll(tasks, timeout, unit);
        } finally {
            decrementPendingTaskCount();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public <T> T invokeAny(Collection<? extends Callable<T>> tasks)
            throws InterruptedException, ExecutionException {
        // It's ok to increment by just one
        incrementPendingTaskCount();
        try {
            return executorService.invokeAny(tasks);
        } finally {
            decrementPendingTaskCount();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public <T> T invokeAny(Collection<? extends Callable<T>> tasks,
            long timeout, TimeUnit unit) throws InterruptedException,
            ExecutionException, TimeoutException {
        incrementPendingTaskCount();
        try {
            return executorService.invokeAny(tasks, timeout, unit);
        } finally {
            decrementPendingTaskCount();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isShutdown() {
        return isShutdown;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isTerminated() {
        return executorService.isTerminated();
    }

    @Override
    public void shutdown() {
        // Lock write lock
        writeLock.lock();
        // Set as shutdown
        isShutdown = true;
        try {
            if (pendingTasks.get() == 0) {
                // Real shutdown
                executorService.shutdown();
            }
        } finally {
            // Unlock write lock
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public List<Runnable> shutdownNow() {
        // Lock write lock
        writeLock.lock();
        // Set as shutdown
        isShutdown = true;
        // Unlock write lock
        writeLock.unlock();

        return executorService.shutdownNow();
    }

    @Override
    public <T> Future<T> submit(final Callable<T> task) {
        // Create execution status
        final FutureExecutionStatus futureExecutionStatus = new FutureExecutionStatus();
        // Add task
        return addTask(new Callable<Future<T>>() {
            @Override
            public Future<T> call() {
                return new FutureDelegate<T>(
                        executorService.submit(new Callable<T>() {
                            @Override
                            public T call() throws Exception {
                                try {
                                    // Mark as executed
                                    futureExecutionStatus.setExecuted();
                                    // Run the actual task
                                    return task.call();
                                } finally {
                                    decrementPendingTaskCount();
                                }
                            }
                        }), futureExecutionStatus);
            }
        });
    }

    @Override
    public Future<?> submit(final Runnable task) {
        // Create execution status
        final FutureExecutionStatus futureExecutionStatus = new FutureExecutionStatus();
        // Add task
        return addTask(new Callable<Future<?>>() {
            @Override
            @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
            public Future<?> call() {
                return new FutureDelegate<Object>(
                        (Future<Object>) executorService.submit(new Runnable() {
                            @Override
                            public void run() {
                                try {
                                    // Mark as executed
                                    futureExecutionStatus.setExecuted();
                                    // Run the actual task
                                    task.run();
                                } finally {
                                    decrementPendingTaskCount();
                                }
                            }
                        }), futureExecutionStatus);
            }
        });
    }

    @Override
    public <T> Future<T> submit(final Runnable task, final T result) {
        // Create execution status
        final FutureExecutionStatus futureExecutionStatus = new FutureExecutionStatus();
        // Add task
        return addTask(new Callable<Future<T>>() {
            @Override
            public Future<T> call() {
                return new FutureDelegate<T>(executorService.submit(
                        new Runnable() {
                            @Override
                            public void run() {
                                try {
                                    // Mark as executed
                                    futureExecutionStatus.setExecuted();
                                    // Run the actual task
                                    task.run();
                                } finally {
                                    decrementPendingTaskCount();
                                }
                            }
                        }, result), futureExecutionStatus);
            }
        });
    }

    private class FutureExecutionStatus {
        private volatile boolean executed;

        public FutureExecutionStatus() {
            executed = false;
        }

        public void setExecuted() {
            executed = true;
        }

        public boolean isExecuted() {
            return executed;
        }
    }

    private class FutureDelegate<T> implements Future<T> {
        private Future<T> future;
        private FutureExecutionStatus executionStatus;

        public FutureDelegate(Future<T> future,
                FutureExecutionStatus executionStatus) {
            this.future = future;
            this.executionStatus = executionStatus;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean cancel(boolean mayInterruptIfRunning) {
            boolean cancelled = future.cancel(mayInterruptIfRunning);
            if (cancelled) {
                // Lock read lock
                readLock.lock();
                // If task was not executed
                if (!executionStatus.isExecuted()) {
                    decrementPendingTaskCount();
                }
                // Unlock read lock
                readLock.unlock();
            }
            return cancelled;
        }

        @Override
        public T get() throws InterruptedException, ExecutionException {
            return future.get();
        }

        @Override
        public T get(long timeout, TimeUnit unit) throws InterruptedException,
                ExecutionException, TimeoutException {
            return future.get(timeout, unit);
        }

        @Override
        public boolean isCancelled() {
            return future.isCancelled();
        }

        @Override
        public boolean isDone() {
            return future.isDone();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, thanks a lot for the effort! This looks really comprehensive. It's nice to see that this can be modularized so well. –  Eric Jan 26 '13 at 18:39
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thanks a lot for all your suggestions!

In the end I opted for something that I believe to be reasonably simple. I found out that CountDownLatch is almost what I need. It blocks until the counter reaches 0. The only problem is that it can only count down, not up, and thus does not work in the dynamic setting I have where tasks can submit new tasks. I hence implemented a new class CountLatch that offers additional functionality. (see below) This class I then use as follows.

Main thread calls latch.awaitZero(), blocking until latch reaches 0.

Any thread, before calling executor.execute(..) calls latch.increment().

Any task, just before completing, calls latch.decrement().

When the last task terminates, the counter will reach 0 and thus release the main thread.

Further suggestions and feedback are most welcome!

public class CountLatch {

@SuppressWarnings("serial")
private static final class Sync extends AbstractQueuedSynchronizer {

    Sync(int count) {
        setState(count);
    }

    int getCount() {
        return getState();
    }

    protected int tryAcquireShared(int acquires) {
        return (getState() == 0) ? 1 : -1;
    }

    protected int acquireNonBlocking(int acquires) {
        // increment count
        for (;;) {
            int c = getState();
            int nextc = c + 1;
            if (compareAndSetState(c, nextc))
                return 1;
        }
    }

    protected boolean tryReleaseShared(int releases) {
        // Decrement count; signal when transition to zero
        for (;;) {
            int c = getState();
            if (c == 0)
                return false;
            int nextc = c - 1;
            if (compareAndSetState(c, nextc))
                return nextc == 0;
        }
    }
}

private final Sync sync;

public CountLatch(int count) {
    this.sync = new Sync(count);
}

public void awaitZero() throws InterruptedException {
    sync.acquireSharedInterruptibly(1);
}

public boolean awaitZero(long timeout, TimeUnit unit) throws InterruptedException {
    return sync.tryAcquireSharedNanos(1, unit.toNanos(timeout));
}

public void increment() {
    sync.acquireNonBlocking(1);
}

public void decrement() {
    sync.releaseShared(1);
}

public String toString() {
    return super.toString() + "[Count = " + sync.getCount() + "]";
}

}

Note that the increment()/decrement() calls can be encapsulated into a customized Executor subclass as was suggested, for instance, by Sami Korhonen, or with beforeExecute and afterExecute as was suggested by impl. See here:

public class CountingThreadPoolExecutor extends ThreadPoolExecutor {

protected final CountLatch numRunningTasks = new CountLatch(0);

public CountingThreadPoolExecutor(int corePoolSize, int maximumPoolSize, long keepAliveTime, TimeUnit unit,
        BlockingQueue<Runnable> workQueue) {
    super(corePoolSize, maximumPoolSize, keepAliveTime, unit, workQueue);
}

@Override
public void execute(Runnable command) {
    numRunningTasks.increment();
    super.execute(command);
}

@Override
protected void afterExecute(Runnable r, Throwable t) {
    numRunningTasks.decrement();
    super.afterExecute(r, t);
}

/**
 * Awaits the completion of all spawned tasks.
 */
public void awaitCompletion() throws InterruptedException {
    numRunningTasks.awaitZero();
}

/**
 * Awaits the completion of all spawned tasks.
 */
public void awaitCompletion(long timeout, TimeUnit unit) throws InterruptedException {
    numRunningTasks.awaitZero(timeout, unit);
}

}
share|improve this answer
    
Also, take a look on Semaphore. –  Eng.Fouad Jan 27 '13 at 3:44
    
I did. The problem with Semaphore is that it always blocks when acquiring. The CountLatch does not block when either counting down or up. It just blocks on calls to awaitZero. I guess that's the crucial difference. –  Eric Jan 27 '13 at 9:45
    
I just edited the solution. As mentioned before, it's important to increment the counter when the task is submitted, not when it starts to run. Hence, we need to overwrite execute, not beforeExecute. Thanks again for all your great suggestions. The solution is running smoothly now! –  Eric Jan 28 '13 at 8:59
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Java 7 has incorporated support for recursive tasks via its ForkJoinPool executor. It is quite simple to use and scales quite well, as long as the tasks themselves are not too trivial. Essentially it provides a controlled interface that allows tasks to wait for the completion of any sub-tasks without blocking the underlying thread indefinitely.

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The problem is that with ForkJoinPool every completed task would have to wait for newly created tasks. While this would probably work, it would lead to memory issues, as completed tasks could not be discarded before all have completed (they are all waiting). In our system it can easily happen that we create millions of tasks. –  Eric Jan 26 '13 at 10:19
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One of the suggested options in the answers you link to is to use a CompletionService

You could replace the busy waiting in your main thread with:

while (true) {
    Future<?> f = completionService.take(); //blocks until task completes
    if (executor.getQueue().isEmpty()
         && numTasks.longValue() == executor.getCompletedTaskCount()) break;
}

Note that getCompletedTaskCount only returns an approximate number so you might need to find a better exit condition.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but this would only solve part of the problem, wouldn't it? One would still wrap around the loop for every single task... –  Eric Jan 26 '13 at 10:04
    
@Eric Not sure I understand what you mean. You submit all your tasks from the main thread then you run that loop and wait until it breaks - that should only happen once there is no more task running in the executor. –  assylias Jan 26 '13 at 10:11
    
Right. I agree that it should work. It's just not as nice as I hope it to be. There's still the need to loop over all futures, and to keep track of an explicit completion count. –  Eric Jan 26 '13 at 10:17
    
@assylias: if you have to submit all tasks from a single thread, then you cannot have recursive task submission any more... –  thkala Jan 26 '13 at 10:17
    
@thkala The initial tasks will be submitted from the main thread I suppose - whether those tasks submit new tasks or not does not change the logic and the idea still applies. –  assylias Jan 26 '13 at 10:29
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If you know number of threads to wait and can paste one line of code to increase number for each thread with help of CountDownLatch ( http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/CountDownLatch.html ) It can resolve you problem

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1  
I guess I'd need to know upfront the number of tasks - which I don't. –  Eric Jan 26 '13 at 10:13
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Since the last task doesn't know that it's the last, I actually don't think it's possible to have this work 100% correctly without recording both when tasks launch and when they complete.

If memory serves me right, the getQueue() method returns a queue containing only tasks that are still waiting to be executed, not ones that are currently running. Furthermore, getCompletedTaskCount() is approximate.

The solution I'm pondering goes something like this, using an atomic counter like in Eng.Fouad's answer and a Condition for signaling the main thread to wake up (pardon the shortcuts for simplicity):

public class MyThreadPoolExecutorState {

    public final Lock lock = new ReentrantLock();
    public final Condition workDone = lock.newCondition();
    public boolean workIsDone = false;

}

public class MyThreadPoolExecutor extends ThreadPoolExecutor {

    private final MyThreadPoolExecutorState state;
    private final AtomicInteger counter = new AtomicInteger(0);

    public MyThreadPoolExecutor(MyThreadPoolExecutorState state, ...) {
        super(...);
        this.state = state;
    }

    protected void beforeExecute(Thread t, Runnable r) {
        this.counter.incrementAndGet();
    }

    protected void afterExecute(Runnable r, Throwable t) {
        if(this.counter.decrementAndGet() == 0) {
            this.state.lock.lock();
            try {
                this.state.workIsDone = true;
                this.state.workDone.signal();
            }
            finally {
                this.state.lock.unlock();
            }
        }
    }

}

public class MyApp {

    public static void main(...) {

        MyThreadPoolExecutorState state = new MyThreadPoolExecutorState();
        MyThreadPoolExecutor executor = new MyThreadPoolExecutor(state, ...);

        // Fire ze missiles!
        executor.submit(...);

        state.lock.lock();
        try {
            while(state.workIsDone == false) {
                state.workDone.await();
            }
        }
        finally {
            state.lock.unlock();
        }

    }

}

It could be a little more elegant (maybe just provide a getState() in your thread pool executor or something?), but I think it should get the job done. It's also untested, so implement at your own peril...

It is worth noting that this solution will definitely fail if there are no tasks to be executed -- it'll await the signal indefinitely. So don't even bother starting the executor if you have no tasks to run.


Edit: On second thought, incrementing the atomic counter should happen upon submission, not immediately before task execution (because queuing could cause the counter to fall to 0 prematurely). It probably makes sense to override the submit(...) methods instead, and possibly also remove(...) and shutdown() (if you use them). The general idea remains the same, though. (But the more I think about it, the less pretty it is.)

I'd also check out the internals of the class to see if you can glean any knowledge from it: http://hg.openjdk.java.net/build-infra/jdk7/jdk/file/0f8da27a3ea3/src/share/classes/java/util/concurrent/ThreadPoolExecutor.java. The tryTerminate() method looks interesting.

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it actually looks almost as if overwriting terminated() may just do the trick. One could wait() on a lock in the main thread which is then released using notify within terminated(). –  Eric Jan 26 '13 at 18:42
    
I think using terminated() in combination with a semaphore should actually work... –  Eric Jan 26 '13 at 19:21
    
Never mind; it turns out that, contrary to the JavaDoc, terminated() is only called if shutDown() or terminate() are called, not on normal completion. Too bad... –  Eric Jan 26 '13 at 19:55
    
You should still be able to make it work with afterExecute() and a counter; that part of my example wouldn't change. –  impl Jan 26 '13 at 20:24
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You could use an atomic counter to count the submit (like has been said, before actually submitting). Combine this with a semaphore and release it in the afterExecute hook that a ThreadPoolExecutor provides. Instead of busy-waiting, call semaphore.acquire( counter.get()) after the first round of jobs has been submitted. But the number of acquires will be too small when calling acquire since the counter may increase later on. You would have to loop the acquire calls, with the increase since the last call as the argument, until the counter does not increase anymore.

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