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I have this question:

Given two sorted lists (stored in arrays) of size n, find an O(log n) algorithm that computes the nth largest element in the union of the two lists.

I can see there is probably a trick here as it requires the nth largest element and the arrays are also of size n, but I can't figure out what it is. I was thinking that I could adapt counting sort, would that work?

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How does union of 2 lists work? –  nhahtdh Jan 26 '13 at 10:15
2  
@Gumbo: If the array size is > n, and assuming that "union of 2 lists" just mean putting all of them together, then we can always trim the array to size n (due to the sorted property). –  nhahtdh Jan 26 '13 at 10:20
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O(n) is the naive way: Just compare the smallest element from 2 list, advance the pointer and count. –  nhahtdh Jan 26 '13 at 10:23
2  
If the arrays are sorted and disjoint, then it might be possible in O(log n) (I'm thinking in terms of a binary search). Otherwise - not a chance. –  Jan Dvorak Jan 26 '13 at 10:23
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@Joe: Can you answer my first question? We are confused whether union here means union of set, which removes duplicate element, or is it simply put 2 lists together? –  nhahtdh Jan 26 '13 at 10:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Compare A[n/2] and B[n/2]. If equal, any of them is our result. Other stopping condition for this algorithm is when both arrays are of size 1 (either initially or after several recursion steps). In this case we just choose the largest of A[n/2] and B[n/2].

If A[n/2] < B[n/2], repeat this procedure recursively for second half of A[] and first half of B[].

If A[n/2] > B[n/2], repeat this procedure recursively for second half of B[] and first half of A[].

Since on each step the problem size is (in worst case) halved, we'll get O(log n) algorithm.


Always dividing array size by two to get the index works properly only if n is a power of two. More correct way of choosing indexes (for arbitrary n) would be using the same strategy for one array but choosing complementing index: j=n-i for other one.

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2  
How would you take care of the case {1}, {2}? –  nhahtdh Jan 26 '13 at 10:37
    
Ok, I see that. Pretty obvious now you mention it. Thanks for your help everyone. –  Joe Jan 26 '13 at 10:42
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Like nhahtdh mentionned, you got the main idea in the answer but you must keep a track of how many elements you have discarded so far to know how to split the list when you have uneven lengths and finally pick up the good one when the remaining lists consist of 1 single value. –  Rerito Jan 26 '13 at 10:46
    
Updated answer clarifies this algorithm according to suggestions by nhahtdh and Rerito. –  Evgeny Kluev Jan 26 '13 at 11:00
    
always dividing the array size by 2 works in general case. It is not necessary for n to be power of two. –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 26 '13 at 11:04

Evgeny Kluev gives a better answer - mine was O(n log n) since i didn't think about them as being sorted.

what i can add is give you a link to a very nice video explaining binary search, courtesy of MIT:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNHQ7CRsEtU

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Putting 2 sorted list together into a sorted list will take O(n). –  nhahtdh Jan 26 '13 at 10:34
    
Unfortunately, union is Θ(n). –  Gumbo Jan 26 '13 at 10:35
    
he can choose not to concat them and iterate between the two. aswell as view this in terms of amortization. it depends on how you implement this. he doesn't know if the lists contain repetitions which they might. it could be that i'm still mistaken though, perhaps he doesn't need to concat them at all. –  Shokodemon Jan 26 '13 at 10:42
    
i see now that my logic was O(n log n), i'll edit my post to reflect this. –  Shokodemon Jan 26 '13 at 10:48
    
@Shokodemon: You know that O(n log n) is worse than the normal way of going through both array, which yield at most O(n). –  nhahtdh Jan 26 '13 at 10:49
public static void main(String[] args) {  


int[] fred = { 60, 5, 7, 3, 20, 3, 44 };  

int[] tmp = new int[fred.length];  
go(fred, 1, tmp, 3);  
}  

public static void go(int[] fred, int cnt, int[] tmp, int whatPosition) {  
int max = 0;  
int currentPosition = 0;  
for (int i = 0; i < fred.length; i++) {  
if (i == 0)  
max = fred[i];  
else {  
if (fred[i] > max) {  
max = fred[i];  
currentPosition = i;  
}  
}  
}  
System.arraycopy(fred, 0, tmp, 0, fred.length);  
tmp[currentPosition] = 0;  
cnt++;  
if(cnt != whatPosition)  
go(tmp, cnt, tmp, whatPosition);  
else{  
for (int i = 0; i < tmp.length; i++) {  
if (i == 0)  
max = tmp[i];  
else {  
if (tmp[i] > max) {  
max = tmp[i];  
}  
}  
}  
System.out.println(max);  
}  




}  
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