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I have a class which has accessor methods that are meant to be used outside of the class for peeking at some of its private data.

However, internal methods of the class should not use these public accessors because the internal state of the class is changed by its other methods and these changes are not written to the location the public accessors look at until the computation is done.

Is there a compile-time means of prevent a class from calling one or more of its own members? Alternatively, a run-time check using assert is fine as it can be easily eliminated for release compilations.

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can you provide some pseudo code? – fen Jan 26 '13 at 12:51
1  
I do not have a completely good feeling about what I'm going to propose, but how about having the public accessors of your class C being moved to a derived class D, and making C abstract? This way member functions of C won't be able to invoke them, and clients will work with instances of D, potentially ignoring what C is for. The reason I don't have a completely good feeling about it is that if you are already using inheritance in your model this might lead to unwieldy hierarchies – Andy Prowl Jan 26 '13 at 12:57
1  
Doubt it's possible. It also sounds a bit overengineered - better reduce the complexity of your class if you lose track which internal methods it calls. Or maybe move complex algorithms to free (local, file-static) functions to avoid any unwanted side-effects, and "commit" the results to the objects in the very end, all at once. – Frank Osterfeld Jan 26 '13 at 12:58
    
Andy Prowl: Sounds overengineered to me. I'd rather go for the pimpl idiom if at all, make C a member of D, where C is the private impl and D the public interface. – Frank Osterfeld Jan 26 '13 at 13:03
1  
Just a piece of meta opinion: There's a general guideline that classes should be kept small and take care of one single responsibility (using composition to build on other classes and compose responsibilities). With that in mind, your class should be sufficiently compact that you can simply tell the author not to use the questionable method and verify this by inspection. If you need to protect your code mechanically against your own programmers, perhaps it needs some refactoring? – Kerrek SB Jan 26 '13 at 14:12

While I have never seen this pattern in practice, you could separate implementation and interface (though it is normally the other way around)

namespace detail {
    class Impl {
    protected:
        Impl() : x_(0) {}

        int x_;
        void internal() { x_ = 1; }
        void something_else() { x_ = 2; }
    };
}

class Interface : public detail::Impl {
public:
    int x() const { return x_; }
    void x(int x) { x_ = x; }
};

Or a step further without derivation:

class Interface;

namespace detail {
    class Impl {
    private:
        friend class ::Interface;
        Impl() : x_(0) {}

        int x_;
        void internal() { x_ = 1; }
        void something_else() { x_ = 2; }
    };
}

class Interface {
public:
    int x() const { return impl_.x_; }
    void x(int x) { impl_.x_ = x; }
private:
    Impl impl_;
};

Also lookup the PIMPL idiom, which is often used to reduce header/library/client coupling and to increase compile times.

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2  
Why do you expose detail::Impl by inheriting the interface from it? To me it's more common and better to have a private detail::impl* member inside the interface class. That also allows changing impl arbitrarily without breaking binary compatibility (it's main use case). See for example c2.com/cgi/wiki?PimplIdiom – Frank Osterfeld Jan 26 '13 at 13:08
    
@FrankOsterfeld: True that. I don't think you need to manage the implementation as a pointer in this case, so I added a non-pointer-variant of it. – phresnel Jan 26 '13 at 13:21

Here is my suggestion, for debug builds using assertions:

  • Make a simple function or a macro called IncrementInternalCallCount. This will increment call count within the class. For this just have a counter variable in class. Put this stuff only for debugging/diagnostic purpose.
  • Place the call to this macro/function in each and every method of your class. Except those getter functions.
  • In getter function, check if internal-call-count is more than zero, and if it is. Raise an assertion.

For this, you may use some RAII class, which would increment the counter, and would decrement the counter on function exit. So, you would need to place an RAII object at the beginning of every function. The destructor will be called automatically. This will also enable all non-getter functions be called from other class functions.

Very minimal code (not strictly C++ correct):

class CYourClass
{
    int Counter = 0; // Not C++ syntax

   IncrementCallCounter() { Counter++;}
   DecrementCallCounter() { Counter++;}
   CheckCounterStatus() { if(Counter>0) ASSERT;}

private:
   void InternalFun() 
  {
     IncrementCallCounter();
    // Do work, call anything
    DecrementCallCounter();
  }

public:
int Getter1()
{
   CheckCounterStatus();
}
};
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