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I am just beginning to dabble in Python, and have started to go through the chapters on learnpython.org. In the 'Loops' chapter, I have solved the challenge with the following code. However I am not sure it is the most efficient. It certainly doesn't seem to be as I have to define the "number to not go beyond" twice. In this (I'm guessing) easy problem, DRY should be possible to adhere to, right?

The exercise is

Loop through and print out all even numbers from the numbers list in the same order they are received. Don't print any numbers that come after 237 in the sequence.

My code:

numbers = [ 951, 402, 984, 651, 360, 69, 408, 319, 601, 485, 980, 507, 725, 547, 544, 615, 83, 165, 141, 501, 263, 617, 865, 575, 219, 390, 984, 592, 236, 105, 942, 941, 386, 462, 47, 418, 907, 344, 236, 375, 823, 566, 597, 978, 328, 615, 953, 345, 399, 162, 758, 219, 918, 237, 412, 566, 826, 248, 866, 950, 626, 949, 687, 217, 815, 67, 104, 58, 512, 24, 892, 894, 767, 553, 81, 379, 843, 831, 445, 742, 717, 958, 609, 842, 451, 688, 753, 854, 685, 93, 857, 440, 380, 126, 721, 328, 753, 470, 743, 527 ]

# My Solution
for x in numbers:
  if x != 237:
    if x % 2 == 0:
      print x
  if x == 237:
    break
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That's what else and elif are for:

for x in numbers:
  if x == 237:
    break
  elif x % 2 == 0:
    print x
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1  
It's a pathetic speed improvement but testing for evenness before equality is probably going to be quicker as a number is more likely to be even than equal to 237 and 237 isn't even. –  Ben Jan 26 '13 at 12:54
    
Well, that makes so much sense... Not really sure why I went and overcomplicated things... :) Thx –  Patrik Alienus Jan 26 '13 at 13:03
2  
Actually, neither else nor elif are essential in your example. The 4th line could be just if x%2==0. –  gdbdmdb Jan 26 '13 at 13:07
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This is also possible:

try:
    i = numbers.index(237)
except:
    i = len(numbers)
for n in numbers[:i]:
    if not n%2:
       print n
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Yes, but you have to handle an exception then. –  gdbdmdb Jan 26 '13 at 13:08
    
@thg435, thanks for reminding me to that issue - I,ve fixed it -- but it looks horrible and has severable performance flaws -- I better delete this answer;) –  Theodros Zelleke Jan 26 '13 at 13:17
    
I think the answer is quite helpful in this form. –  gdbdmdb Jan 26 '13 at 13:20
    
This is helpful to me, at least. I'm getting to see that there are indeed maaaany ways of achieving the same goal. Question is, how does one benchmark to see which is the most efficient? Human readability is usually not a good measuring stick :) –  Patrik Alienus Jan 26 '13 at 18:18
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Another method is using itertools which always comes in useful some way or another:

>>> from itertools import takewhile, ifilter
>>> not_237 = takewhile(lambda L: L != 237, numbers)
>>> is_even = ifilter(lambda L: L % 2 == 0, not_237)
>>> list(is_even)
[402, 984, 360, 408, 980, 544, 390, 984, 592, 236, 942, 386, 462, 418, 344, 236, 566, 978, 328, 162, 758, 918]

So we create a lazy iterator that stops at 237, then take from that even numbers

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1  
I'm sure that's really neat, but did you read the part about "simple examples"? :) –  Patrik Alienus Jan 26 '13 at 12:57
    
@PatrikAlienus Well - I think it's simpler and clearer than looping :) –  Jon Clements Jan 26 '13 at 12:59
    
Okay I guess it's an addition to the collective knowledge, but I don't understand more than 10 % of that :) –  Patrik Alienus Jan 26 '13 at 13:01
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