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So i have my definition of the list as a global variable:

typedef struct center {

  char center_name[100];

  char hostname[100];

  int port;

  struct center *next_center;

} center;

I need to add elements to the list. But these elements that i need to add are on a file, so:

 int main(int argc, char** argv) {
     center *head = NULL; 
     parse(argv, head);
  }

parse is a function, which read the file and add those read elements to a new center (all of this works, it double checked)

void parser (char** argv, center *head) {
   //read the elements i need to add
   //creates a newCenter and adds the elements read to the new center
   //this far it works
  addToCenter(newCenter, head); 
}

where:

addToCenter(center *newCenter, center *head){
   //adds newCenter to the list
   if (head == null)
      head = newCenter;
   else {
      //find last element
      lastelement.next_center = newCenter; 
   }

}

Everything works, except that the list on Main always return as null. In other words, the reference is not being modified. I dont understand why, because i am passing a pointer to the list.

another solution i though is to create the head variable of the list as a global variable, but its better to avoid those situations.

Thanks in advance.

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You've modified the passed pointer value 'head' which is on the stack. –  kenny Jan 26 '13 at 13:57
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your list head is being passed by value. You need to pass the head pointer by address in case it is modified (which it will be).

Example:

addToCenter(center *newCenter, center *head) // <=== note: passed by value
{
   //adds newCenter to the list
   if (head == null)
      head = newCenter; // <=== note: modified local stack parameter only.
   else {
      //find last element
      lastelement.next_center = newCenter; 
   }
}

should be:

addToCenter(center *newCenter, center **head) // <=== note: now passed by address
{
   //adds newCenter to the list
   if (*head == null)
      *head = newCenter;  // <=== note: now modifies the source pointer.
   else {
      //find last element
      lastelement.next_center = newCenter; 
   }
}

Likewise with parse:

void parser (char** argv, center **head) // <=== again, the head-pointer's *address*
{
   //read the elements i need to add
   //creates a newCenter and adds the elements read to the new center
   //this far it works
  addToCenter(newCenter, head);  // <=== just forward it on.
}

And finally back in main:

int main(int argc, char** argv) 
{
     center *head = NULL; 
     parse(argv, &head);  // <=== note: passing address of the head-pointer. (thus a dbl-pointer).
}
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really well explained! thanks i understood much better. Yeah ill acccept the asnwer as soon as it lets me. I forgot about &, which gives me the address of the Object i am passing. Again, really well explained. –  Alessandroempire Jan 26 '13 at 14:05
    
@Alessandroempire no worries. just glad it makes sense. pointers-to-pointers is often a hard thing for people new to C to grasp right away, or to recognize when it is needed, as it is in this case. that it is clear enough for you is good. glad to help. –  WhozCraig Jan 26 '13 at 14:08
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You need to pass it like this:

void parser (char** argv, center **head) {
   //read the elements i need to add
   //creates a newCenter and adds the elements read to the new center
   //this far it works
  addToCenter(newCenter, &head); 
}

addToCenter(center *newCenter, center **head){
   //adds newCenter to the list
   if (*head == null)
      *head = newCenter;
   else {
      //find last element
      lastelement.next_center = newCenter; 
   }

}

And in main:

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
     center *head = NULL; 
     parse(argv, &head);
}

You have to do this because values in C are by default, passed by value. Since you're passing the address of the list by value, and not by reference. When you pass the variable head by reference as above program, you'll be able to modify the list and get the data back to the list. Otherwise, it is going to pass by value and the value of head will never be modified(hence you got NULL)

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i forgot... & gives me the address of the object, right? –  Alessandroempire Jan 26 '13 at 14:04
    
yes, it does @Alessandroempire –  Aniket Jan 26 '13 at 14:06
    
@Alessandroempire it gives you the address of the variable you're applying it to. –  WhozCraig Jan 26 '13 at 14:06
    
yes, C isn't an object oriented language so every thing that can be thought of as object is actually a variable(this is also the case with C++ iMho even if it is OO) –  Aniket Jan 26 '13 at 14:07
    
Well sorry its just i have to work a program in C and another in Java so sometimes i kind of mixed them up. My bad, but yeah i remember now. Thanks a lot –  Alessandroempire Jan 26 '13 at 14:08
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Passing a pointer into function allows you to see the result of assigning pointed-to value outside of function. However, pointer itself is still passed by value.

In order to modify head within parser and addToCenter, you have to pass a pointer to head into both functions.

void parser(char** argv, centerPtr **headPtr) {
     /* rewrite using *headPtr instead of head */
}
void addToCenter(center *newCenter, center **headPtr) {
     /* rewrite using *headPtr instead of head */
}
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    ....
    parser(argv, &head);
    ....
}
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In your functions you modify a local copy of the pointer, not the pointer itself. You should change your functions definitions to take a pointer to pointer.

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You seem to be missing a part of knowledge about pointer logic. I'll attempt to describe what's wrong here.

First of all, let's rewrite any void* as int, which is (sort of) what happens internally.

addToCenter(int newCenter, int head){
   //adds newCenter to the list
   if (head == 0)
       head = newCenter;

And there you go, the problem illustrates itself.

The solution?

addToCenter(center *newCenter, center **head){
   //adds newCenter to the list
   if (*head == null)
       *head = newCenter;
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A bit more explanation would be helpful. It's very early here, and "the problem illustrates itself" is just not doing it for me at the moment. –  Nocturno Jan 26 '13 at 14:37
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