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As the unit test is a white box test, it assume that you must know in advance all the case your code must traited, all the client object ( aka Mock object in the test) your code must deal with, and the correct order in which client object must appear in the code ( since unit test is taken in account the calling of mock object). In other word you must know exactly the detailled algorithm of your code. To know exactly the algorithm of your code you must write it first!. From my point of view i don't see how it's possible to write correct unit test before writing source code. Nevertheless it's possible to write functional test first since functional test is a sort of user requirement Your advice? Best regard

AN EXAMPLE IS GIVEN ON THIS NEW QUESTION: How to write test code before write source code when they are objects dependencies?

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5 Answers

In other word you must know exactly the detailled algorithm of your code.

Not quite. You must know exactly the detailed behavior of your code, as observed from outside the code itself. The algorithm which achieves this behavior, or combination of algorithms, or any levels of abstraction/nesting/calculations/etc. are immaterial to the tests. The tests only care that the desired result is achieved.

The value of the tests, then, is that they are the specifications of how the code should behave. So the code is free to change all you want, as long as it can still be validated against the tests. You can improve performance, refactor for readability and supportability, etc. The tests ensure that the behavior remains unchanged.

For example, suppose I want to write a function which adds two numbers. You may know in your head how you're going to implement it, but put that knowledge aside for a moment. You're not implementing it yet. First, you're implementing the test...

public void CanAddIntegers()
{
    var addend = 1;
    var augend = 1;
    var result = MyMathObject.Add(addend, augend);
    Assert.AreEqual(2, result);
}

Now that you have a test, you can implement the method...

public int Add(int addend, int augend)
{
    return ((addend * 2) + (augend * 2)) / 2;
}

Whoa. Wait a minute... Why on Earth did I implement it like that? Well, from the perspective of the test, who cares? It passes. The implementation meets the requirements. And now that I have a test, I can safely refactor the code...

public int Add(int addend, int augend)
{
    return addend + augend;
}

That's a little more sane. And the test still passes. In fact, I can further reduce the code...

public int Add(int addend, int augend)
{
    return 2;
}

Guess what? The test still passes. It's the only test we have, it's the only specification given, so the code "works." So clearly we need to improve the tests to cover more cases. Writing more tests will give us the specifications we need to write more code.

In fact, that last implementation should have been the first one, according to the third rule of TDD:

You are not allowed to write any more production code than is sufficient to pass the one failing unit test.

So in a purely-Uncle-Bob-driven TDD world, we would have written that last implementation first, then written more tests and gradually improved the code.

This is known as the Red, Green, Refactor cycle. It's very well illustrated in a simple slightly-less-contrived example, the Bowling Game. The purpose of that exercise is to practice that cycle:

  1. First, write a test which expects certain behavior. This is the Red part of the cycle, because the test will fail without the behavior in place.
  2. Next, write code to exhibit that behavior. This is the Green part of the cycle, because its purpose is to get the test to pass. And only to get the test to pass.
  3. Finally, refactor the code and improve it. This is, naturally, the Refactor part of the cycle.

Where you're getting stuck is that you're perpetually in the Refactor part of the cycle. You're already thinking about how to make the code better. What algorithm would be correct, how to optimize it, how it ultimately should be written. To that end, TDD is an exercise in patience. Don't write the best code... yet.

  1. First, determine what the code should do, and nothing more.
  2. Next, write code that does it, and nothing more.
  3. Finally, improve that code and make it better.

UPDATE

I came across something which reminded me of this question, and a random though occurred to me. Perhaps I misinterpreted the circumstances of what you're asking. How are you managing your dependencies? That is, what sort of dependency injection methodology are you using? It sounds like that may be the root of the issue being discussed here.

For about as long as I can remember, I've used something like Common Service Locator (or, more commonly, home-grown implementations of the same concept). And in doing so I tend toward a very specific style of dependency injection. It sounds like you're using a different style. Constructor injection, perhaps? I'll assume constructor injection for the sake of this answer.

So then let's say, as you indicate, that MyMathObject has dependencies on MyOtherClass1 and MyOtherClass2. Using constructor injection, that makes the footprint of MyMathObject look like this:

public class MyMathObject
{
    public MyMathObject(MyOtherClass1 firstDependency, MyOtherClass2 secondDependency)
    {
        // implementation details
    }

    public int Add(int addend, int augend)
    {
        // implementation details
    }
}

And so, as you indicate, the tests need to supply the dependencies or mocks thereof. In the footprint of the class there's no indication of the actual use of MyOtherClass1 or MyOtherClass2, but there is indication of the need for them. As dependencies they are loudly advertised by the constructor.

So this begs the question you've asked... How can one write the tests first when one hasn't implemented the object yet? Again, there's no indication of the actual use in only the external-facing design of the object. So the dependency is an implementation detail that needs to be known.

Otherwise, you'd first write this:

public class MyMathObject
{
    public int Add(int addend, int augend)
    {
        // implementation details
    }
}

Then you'd write your tests for it, then you'd implement it and discover the dependencies, then you'd re-write your tests for it. Therein lies the problem.

The problem that you've found, however, isn't an issue of the tests or of Test Driven Development. The problem is actually in the design of the object. Despite the fact that // implementation details have been glazed over, there's still an implementation detail that's escaping. There's a leaky abstraction:

public class MyMathObject
{
    public MyMathObject(MyOtherClass1 firstDependency, MyOtherClass2 secondDependency)
    {                   ^---Right here                 ^---And here

        // implementation details
    }

    public int Add(int addend, int augend)
    {
        // implementation details
    }
}

The object isn't encapsulating and abstracting its implementation details sufficiently. It's trying to, and the use of dependency injection is a major step toward that. But it isn't fully there yet. This is because the dependencies, which are implementation details, are externally visible and externally known by other objects. (In this case, the testing object.) So in order to satisfy the dependencies and make MyMathObject work, external objects need to know about its implementation details. They all do. The test object, any production code objects which use it, anything and everything that relies on it in any way.

To that end, you might want to consider switching around how the dependencies are managed. Instead of something like constructor injection or setter injection, further invert the management of dependencies and have the object internally resolve them through yet another object.

Using the aforementioned service locator as a starting pattern, it's pretty easy to craft an object whose sole purpose (whose single responsibility) is to resolve dependencies. If you're using a dependency injection framework then this object is generally just a pass-through for the framework's functionality (but abstracting the framework itself... so one less dependency, which is a good thing). If using home-grown functionality than this object abstracts that functionality.

But what you end up with is something like this within MyMathObject:

private SomeInternalFunction()
{
    var firstDependency = ServiceLocatorObject.Resolve<MyOtherClass1>();
    // implementation details
}

So now the footprint of MyMathObject, even with dependency injection, is:

public class MyMathObject
{
    public int Add(int addend, int augend)
    {
        // implementation details
    }
}

No leaky abstractions, no externally-known dependencies. Tests don't need to be changed as implementation details are changed. This is another step toward de-coupling the tests from the objects they're testing.

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+1 for this, great articulate answer. –  SpaceBison Jan 26 '13 at 14:29
    
Assume that when i'm going to implemented class MyMathObject i must use another client class: MyOtherClass1 and MyOtherClass2. The test you have writen must declare explictly MyOtherClass1 and MyOtherClass2 as mockObject. Then test you have write first is quickly obselete –  Belin Jan 26 '13 at 14:42
    
@Belin: I'm not sure what you're asking. Are you referring to dependency inversion? You can mock your dependencies, since in this case all you're testing is MyMathObject. (Of course, the same tests can be used for both unit testing and integration testing if the choice between a mock and a live implementation is just a matter of configuration. From the perspective of the test, which is outside the implementation, there is no difference in behavior.) –  David Jan 26 '13 at 14:46
    
@Belin: Well, tests become obsolete all the time. The Refactor part of the cycle doesn't just improve the code, it also improves the tests. In that case it's the code which is re-validating the tests as you refactor them. The code and the tests grow at the same pace, side-by-side. Think of them like double-entry bookkeeping practices. –  David Jan 26 '13 at 14:47
    
I say that if the class under the test is using other class, those other class must be mocked in the unit test. Then your test will be quickly become obsolete if in advance you don't know which other class the main class will use. –  Belin Jan 26 '13 at 14:58
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To begin with: plenty of unit tests require no Mocks, no interactions with other objects; your question doesn't apply to those.

If the purpose, or part of the purpose, of a new method is to have an effect on some collaborating object, then that is part of what must be tested. If that's not its purpose, but your implementation incidentally has an effect on a collaborator, then you should not be testing that incidental effect.

Either way, it's easy to see that you can write the test before writing the code. If your method is supposed to affect another object, then the test should say so. If your method isn't supposed to, the test needs to say nothing about the method's interaction with other objects.

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Clearly you cannot write a test if you have no understanding of what the "software" intent is, but it is absolutely possible if the requirements or specifications are detailed.

You can write something that fits the requirement that will fail; then produce the minimum amount of work to make the test pass based on the specification.

Unless you're some kind of genius - this first cut will need refactoring and abstractions introduced, patterns, maintainability, performance and all kinds of other things accounted for.

So if the requirements are understood, you can test first - but the test will not pass until the implementation comes together and only the implementation to make the test pass is required.

It won't always fit the bill in reality to work in this way - particularly if specification is hard to come by. You need to be careful not to blindly storm down this path if you're not getting what you need as a developer. It's also, often, impossible to achieve when inheriting code or adding to "brownfield" projects. As a developer, it's important to work out the practicalities early on.

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I think test related to requirements is functional test not unit test. It's easier to write functional –  Belin Jan 26 '13 at 14:28
    
Which unit tests will you write which are not related ultimately to the functionality of the software? Unit tests are at a much lower level, but still relevant for test-first. –  SpaceBison Jan 28 '13 at 8:34
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Well not really. With TDD you are starting off with your test cases which you are anticipating your product code to handle. It doesnt mean there should be no product code. Your classes functions etc can exist. You start off with failing test cases and then keep making changes to your product code to get them to pass.

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa730844(v=vs.80).aspx#guidelinesfortdd_topic2

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How to know in advance object client your class must use, i think you must a least write a sequence diagram an a sequence diagram is from my point of view a sort of algorithm –  Belin Jan 26 '13 at 14:31
1  
Well if your test needs it you will go write it. You may start off by using a class that does not exist and then generating the class and then slowly build out your logic from there. –  allen Jan 26 '13 at 14:42
    
It's not longer unit test from my point of view. Unit test must be working even if client class are not implemented yet –  Belin Jan 26 '13 at 15:10
    
Your UTs are supposed to be passing when you complete the functionality that you are delivering targeted by these tests. No one said TDD wont disrupt any established understandings. –  allen Jan 26 '13 at 15:20
    
This is an example of what i talk about: stackoverflow.com/questions/14538910/… –  Belin Jan 26 '13 at 19:05
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This is a really hard problem for people to get past when starting TDD. I'm sure there are a lot of good answers on SO and especially on programmers.stackexchange.com (this question is probably more suited for that forum).

There are a lot of things I could say to help you understand, but none would work as well as you actually doing some TDD. As a quick place to start, I'll refer you to this article on code katas, which links to some useful TDD exercises.

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My simple question is how you can know in advance the client class your class must use? in the black box test ( functional test) it's not necessary to know how my class is doing in the detail. All thing i must know is what is the final result i expect when i calling a method –  Belin Jan 26 '13 at 14:37
    
@Belin, go try it. Really. Reading about it is not going to help you get it if David's answer didn't. –  tallseth Jan 26 '13 at 14:45
    
This is the example show exactly the problem: stackoverflow.com/questions/14538910/… –  Belin Jan 26 '13 at 19:04
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