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#include<iostream>
class A{
    public :
        int a;
};
int main(){
    A obj;
    obj.a = 5;
    A b(obj);

    b.a = 6;
    std::cout<<obj.a;
    return 0;

}

why is the answer returned as 5 , by default copy constructor in C++ returns a shallow copy. Isn't the shallow copy means reference ?? or m i missing something ?

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1  
If it didn't make a copy, why would it be called a copy constructor? Note that shallow vs. deep is a bit irrelevant, as there's nothing to deep copy in your example. –  chris Jan 26 '13 at 16:20
    
Why do you think obj.a will change unless you explicitly change state of obj? –  Alok Save Jan 26 '13 at 16:21
    
i think compiler will return reference of obj to a , that is y i thought this –  Peter Jan 26 '13 at 16:23
    
@Peter: No the copy constructor as the name suggests returns a copy of the object it receives as an argument. –  Alok Save Jan 26 '13 at 16:24
    
okay so but in java when we pass objects in functions , the copy constructor is called then also right , then y is it by reference then , does java's copy constructor by default returns reference , is there no significance of word copy there –  Peter Jan 26 '13 at 16:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

shallow copy means reference ?? or m i missing something ?

You are missing something. Shallow copy means copy. It copies all the members of the object from one to another. It is NOT a reference. The copy created is completely independent of the original

See this excellent tutorial for the difference between shallow and deep copy.

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then what is deep copy if anyways shallow copy is making a copy –  Peter Jan 26 '13 at 16:23
    
@Peter, If you have a pointer, it will copy the pointer, not what it points to. Copying what it points to has to be done explicitly. That's a deep copy. –  chris Jan 26 '13 at 16:24
    
okay so but in java when we pass objects in functions , the copy constructor is called then also right , then y is it by reference then , does java's copy constructor by default returns reference , is there no significance of word copy there –  Peter Jan 26 '13 at 16:26
    
@Peter In java they are passed by value, not by copy constructor. AFAIK even in java a copy constructor does create a new copy, but the difference being it has to be explicitly called. –  Karthik T Jan 26 '13 at 16:27
    
@Peter Reference the way you think of it is a Java term. Closest is a pointer in C. But that has nothing to do with this question. Java copy constructor returns a reference to a copy of the original, not a reference to the original –  Karthik T Jan 26 '13 at 16:28

b is a completely separate object from obj. It has its own a independent of obj's.

It sounds like what you have in mind is a reference:

A& b = obj;

After this, both b and obj refer to the same object. Changes made through b would be visible through obj and vice versa.

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i thought default copy construtor will return reference of the object in b of obj –  Peter Jan 26 '13 at 16:22
    
@Peter: No it doesn't. The two objects are completely separate. –  NPE Jan 26 '13 at 16:23

shallow copy means reference ?? or m i missing something ?

Yes, you're missing something.

Shallow copy doesn't mean reference. Shallow copy means copying the members : if a member is a pointer, then it copies the address, not the content the pointer is pointing to. That means, the pointers in the original object and the so-called copied object point to the same content in memory. That is called shallow copy. Deep copy, on the other hand, doesn't copy the address, it creates a new pointer (in the new object), allocates memory for it, and then copies the content the original pointer points to.

In your case, shallow copy and deep copy make no difference because there are no pointer member(s) in the class. Every member is copied (as usual), and since no member is a pointer, each copied member is a different member in memory. That is, the original object and the copied object are completely different objects in memory. There is absolutely nothing that the two objects share with each other. So when you modify one, it doesn't at all change anything in the other.

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okay so but in java when we pass objects in functions , the copy constructor is called then also right , then y is it by reference then , does java's copy constructor by default returns reference , is there no significance of word copy there –  Peter Jan 26 '13 at 16:27
    
@Peter: I don't know Java. And C++ is not Java. –  Nawaz Jan 26 '13 at 16:28

Yes, the default copy constructor is a shallow copy. See more here

But, b is completely disjoint from a, so the two things are not related directly.

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A b(obj) copies obj information into the newly created object b. Yes it's a shallow copy so b does not actually control what's being assigned to it. What you're probably thinking about is a reference:

A& b = obj;

b.a = 6;

std::cout << obj.a; // 6
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