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I'm creating a platform/foundation component (set of .NET assemblies) that is going to be responsible for accessing (reading/writing) configuration values. This component is to be used by other components that are going to be created on the platform.

I want this component to be easy to use for consumers, but also have high testability and maintainability. In my current design I have a static class (ConfigurationManager) that contains some methods (for example GetKeyValueSetting). This ConfigurationManager class is special in that it can either get the configuration values from the local .NET .config file, but also from a SharePoint list (some of the components are hosted in a Shared SharePoint environment) and even from another shared config value store. The Manager should be able to read from multiple locations in a prioritized fashion:

  • if running on SharePoint: 1. SharePointSettingsProvider, 2. SharedStoreSettingsProvider
  • if not running on SharePoint: 1. ConfigFileSettingsProvider 2. SharedStoreSettingsProvider

I know that a static class creates a lot of issues in regards to testability, extensibility etc so I don't want to use that. My next alternative is a Singleton, but in regards to the aforementioned -ilities this is not a much better solution. Any ideas for a better solution?

My current design is as follows:

public static class ConfigurationManager
{
    // internal for testability
    internal IEnumerable<ISettingsProvider> SettingsProviders {get;set;}

    // internal for testability
    internal ISettingsProviderFactory ProvidersFactory {get;set;}

    public static string GetKeyValueSetting(string key)
    {        
    }
}

public interface ISettingsProvider
{
    string GetKeyValueSetting(string key);
}

public class ConfigFileSettingsProvider : ISettingsProvider
{
}

public class SharePointSettingsProvider : ISettingsProvider
{
}

public class SharedStoreSettingsProvider : ISettingsProvider
{
}

public interface ISettingsProviderFactory
{
    IEnumerable<ISettingsProvider> GetProviders();
}
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Do you want/need global state for some reason? –  tallseth Jan 26 '13 at 16:28
    
will it be accessed in a multithreaded fashion? –  bas Jan 26 '13 at 16:31
    
Well maybe I should update my question. I don't need global state. I just want my consumers to be able to use my ConfigurationManager class without the need for them to provide me with ISettingsProvider instances for every KeyValue that they want to retrieve. –  MichaelvR Jan 26 '13 at 16:33
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1 Answer

Why not this:

public abstract class ConfigurationManager
{
    public abstract string GetKeyValueSetting(string key);

    public static ConfigurationManager GetInstance()
    {
         return GetInstance(GetDefaultSettingProvider(), GetDefaultProviderFactory());
    }

    public static ConfigurationManager GetInstance(ISettingsProvider provider, IProviderFactory factory)
    {
         return new InternallyVisibleConfigurationManagerImplementation(provider, factory);
    }
}

This has a lot of benefits:

  • ConfigurationManager is abstract, so calling code can Mock it easily
  • It's easy to get a default implementation
  • Calling assemblies can easily configure it with different providers and factories
  • Calling assemblies cannot couple to a concrete type
  • You can change the specific implementation type easily (i.e., maybe you want a caching proxy so you don't need to make expensive calls to sharepoint as often)
  • You keep all your easy testability
  • You can refactor to a singleton or other variations of life-cycle management without changing client code

If callers really hate this, and don't mind their unit tests calling sharepoint sites sometimes, you could add a convenience method like this:

public static string GetKeyValueSetting(string key)
{
    return GetInstance().GetKeyValueSetting(key);
}

EDIT

To use a couple of stores, create a class like this:

internal class OrderedCompositeSettingProvider : ISettingProvider
{
    private readonly ISettingProvider[] _providers;

    private OrderedCompositeSettingProvider(ISettingProvider[] providers)
    {
        _providers = providers;
    }

    internal static ISettingProvider GetInstance(params ISettingProvider[] providers)
    {
         return new OrderedCompositeSettingProvider(providers)
    }

    public string GetKeyValueSetting(string key)
    {
        foreach(var provider in _providers)
        {
             var setting = provider.GetKeyValueSetting(key);
             if(!string.IsNullOrEmpty(setting)) return setting;
        }
        return string.empty;
    }

}

Then in the ConfigurationManager factory method:

public static ConfigurationManager GetInstance()
{
     return GetInstance(GetAppropriateProvider(), GetDefaultProviderFactory());
}

private static ISettingsProvider GetAppropriateProvider()
{
     if(ShouldUseSharepoint())
          return OrderedCompositeSettingProvider.GetInstance(new SharepointProvider(), new StoredSettingsProvider());

     return OrderedCompositeSettingProvider.GetInstance(new ConfigFileProvider(), new StoredSettingsProvider());
}
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Thx for the answer Tallseth. I updated the question and added some info about the need for the Manager to decide which SettingsProvider to use in which order, for specific environments. Could you elaborate on how you would implement that requirement? –  MichaelvR Jan 26 '13 at 17:48
    
Updated. Depending on more details of your context, you might want to encapsulate the logic in GetApprpriateProvider into a ProviderFactory. I didn't do that because I don't fully understand how you expect to use that class, and because it allowed me a little more berevity. –  tallseth Jan 26 '13 at 19:25
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