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I have implemented a simple linked list but it does not seem to let go of memory when after deleting all the pointers I use. I was hoping somebody could point out what I am missing here. I am using Activity Monitor to view xcode's memory usage, maybe this is an innacurate method of viewing the memory usage? I'm not sure. Here is the code:

#include <iostream>
struct node {
    int data;
    node *next;
};

//function to traverse linked list
void traverse(node *root){
    node *trav;

    std::cout << "The list is as follows:\n";
    //traverses through lists
    trav = root;
    do{
        std::cout << (*trav).data << "\n";
        trav = trav->next;
    }while(trav != NULL);
    std::cout << "\n";

    delete trav;
}

void addToList(node *root){
    node *tmp;
    tmp = root;
    if(tmp->next != NULL){
        while(tmp->next !=0){
            tmp = tmp->next;
        }
    }

    //adds new nodes to list
    for(int i = 0 ; i<1000000 ; i++){
        tmp->next = new node;
        tmp = tmp->next;
        tmp->data = i;  
    }
    tmp->next = NULL;

    delete tmp;
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{   
    node *root;         //this is the root node. it will not change

    //sets up root node
    root = new node;    //root points to a node structure (this is a memory address)
    root->next=NULL;       //next pointer is now "0"
    root->data = 5;     //data in this node = 5

    //print initial list
    traverse(root);
    //add to list
    addToList(root);
    //print new list
    traverse(root);

    delete root;
    return 0;
}

===================EDIT - 9:28 AM EST, JAN 27================================

Thank you all for your great feedback here. I understand I have been doing quite a few things wrong (this is my introduction to c++ and dynamic memory allocation. I appreciate the help!)

Please find updated code below. I have run into the following issues: 1 -- again, real memory usage as reported by activity monitor is not being released from the process running this (running from terminal and xcode both show this). This happens when the below failure occurs, but also when i set the for loop in addToList to loop well below 65514. --> FIXED - this is no longer a question (was missing a pair of brackets, causing my code to not delete properly. oops!)

2 -- at the node where data = 65514, I am getting: EXC_BAD_ACCESS (code 2) on the first line of ~node -- why? Xcode gives the following:

Exception State Registers       
trapno  unsigned int    
err unsigned int    
faultvaddr  unsigned long   
Floating Point Registers        
fctrl   unsigned short  
fstat   unsigned short  
ftag    unsigned char   
fop unsigned short  
fioff   unsigned int    
fiseg   unsigned short  
fooff   unsigned int    
foseg   unsigned short  
mxcsr   unsigned int    
mxcsrmask   unsigned int    
stmm0   <invalid>   
stmm1   <invalid>   
stmm2   <invalid>   
stmm3   <invalid>   
stmm4   <invalid>   
stmm5   <invalid>   
stmm6   <invalid>   
stmm7   <invalid>   
xmm0    <invalid>   
xmm1    <invalid>   
xmm2    <invalid>   
xmm3    <invalid>   
xmm4    <invalid>   
xmm5    <invalid>   
xmm6    <invalid>   
xmm7    <invalid>   
xmm8    <invalid>   
xmm9    <invalid>   
xmm10   <invalid>   
xmm11   <invalid>   
xmm12   <invalid>   
xmm13   <invalid>   
xmm14   <invalid>   
xmm15   <invalid>   
General Purpose Registers       
rax unsigned long   
rbx unsigned long   0x0000000000000000
rcx unsigned long   
rdx unsigned long   
rdi unsigned long   
rsi unsigned long   
rbp unsigned long   0x00007fff6ca0c210
rsp unsigned long   0x00007fff6ca0c1c0
r8  unsigned long   
r9  unsigned long   
r10 unsigned long   
r11 unsigned long   
r12 unsigned long   0x0000000000000000
r13 unsigned long   0x0000000000000000
r14 unsigned long   0x0000000000000000
r15 unsigned long   0x0000000000000000
rip unsigned long   0x000000010d60cb96
rflags  unsigned long   
cs  unsigned long   
fs  unsigned long   
gs  unsigned long   

I presume this has something to do with the limit of an unsigned short, as seen in some of the registers, however, I am not using an unsigned short. ??!?!

Here is my current code:

#include <iostream>
struct node {
    long data;
    node *next;
    node():next(NULL){} //just to be safe, initialize as null to start
    //destructor used to clean up list nodes
    ~node(){
        std::cout << data << "  ";
        if(next != NULL){ 
            std::cout << data << ": deleted\n";
            delete next;
            next = NULL;
        }
    } 
};

//function to traverse linked list
void traverse(node *root){
    node *trav;

    std::cout << "The list is as follows:\n";
    //traverses through lists
    trav = root;
    do{
        std::cout << (*trav).data << "\n";
        trav = trav->next;
    }while(trav != NULL);
    std::cout << "\n";
}

void addToList(node *root){
    node *tmp;
    tmp = root;
    if(tmp->next != NULL){
        while(tmp->next !=0){
            tmp = tmp->next;
        }
    }

    //adds new nodes to list
    for(long i = 0 ; i<100000 ; i++){
        tmp->next = new node;
        tmp = tmp->next;
        tmp->data = i;  
    }
    tmp->next = NULL;    
}


int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{   
    node *root;         //this is the root node. it will not change

    //sets up root node
    root = new node;    //root points to a node structure (this is a memory address)
    root->next=NULL;       //next pointer is now "0"
    root->data = 5;     //data in this node = 5

    //print initial list
    //traverse(root);
    //add to list
    addToList(root);
    //print new list
    //traverse(root);

    delete root;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Get a good book and reread the chapter about memory management. You seem to be under the impression that you should arbitrarily delete pointers that you have defined. That is not true, the pointers themselves have automatic storage duration within your functions. You should only ever delete things that have a matching new. –  us2012 Jan 26 '13 at 17:24
    
Is it your intended goal that deleting a single node regarded from a pointer (like delete root;) will, in fact, delete all nodes forward-linked to that one (i.e. its entire next chain)? The answer to that question will significantly alter the answer you get here. –  WhozCraig Jan 27 '13 at 2:32
    
WhozCraig, yes, this is my intended goal. I beleive that the solutions suggested by various members (in particular, Karthik T) should do this. –  nmio Jan 27 '13 at 14:26

4 Answers 4

you don't delete all the nodes you create, you have to go through all your list of nodes, starting by the root one, and delete them one after the other (should consider making a delete function for that)

something like that:

node *actual, *next;
actual = root;

while (actual != null)
{
   next = actual->next;
   delete actual;
   actual = next;
}
share|improve this answer

The problem is that you delete the root node, but that does not automatically delete also all the nodes which are linked to it directly and indirectly.

If you want that to happen, you can create a destructor for node that deletes the object pointed to by the next pointer, if this is not NULL. This will unroll a chain of destructor calls that will end up deleting all the nodes linked to the one you are deleting.

Or you can even manually traverse the list backwards and delete each node if you wish, but I do not suggest that - it's needlessly complicated and error-prone.

Another (unrelated, but equally bad if not worse) problem is in addToList(). You should not do this:

delete tmp;

It will delete an object which is still pointed to by the previous node in the list. This creates a dangling pointer (i.e. a non-NULL pointer that seems to point to some existing object, but actually does not).

A similar consideration applies for function traverse(), as @us2012 correctly pointed out:

delete trav;

This delete instruction won't create any dangling pointer, but is useless, because the delete operator does nothing when the input pointer is NULL (which is your case).

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Also, delete trav; in traverse does not make sense at all! –  us2012 Jan 26 '13 at 17:21
    
@us2012: right, I didn't even look at that function... –  Andy Prowl Jan 26 '13 at 17:21
    
delete trav; should not create a dangling pointer because trav is always NULL when delete trav; is called. It's still incorrect though. –  us2012 Jan 26 '13 at 17:26
    
@us2012: correct again. I made too a blind assumption instead of spending some more time reading that code, my bad. Something in my subconscious just refuses to focus on it :-) –  Andy Prowl Jan 26 '13 at 17:30
    
-1 for manual delete. –  Puppy Jan 26 '13 at 22:41

The general guide is, if your code contains delete, you're almost certainly doing it very, very wrong.

struct node {
    int data;
    std::unique_ptr<node> next;
};

Now each node will destroy the next node in the chain when it is destroyed, meaning that the list cleans itself up. You can allocate the first node on the stack, allowing it to be freed when it goes out of scope, or use another unique_ptr.

You also definitely do not want to delete the list when you traverse through it.

share|improve this answer
    
You're not giving the OP a clue on the reason why his code fails, why his usage of new and delete is wrong, and how those operators actually work; you're just telling him "forget new and delete". That does not answer his question. -1. –  Andy Prowl Jan 26 '13 at 23:30
    
It solves his problem, because "Forget new and delete" is perfectly sound advice that solves almost all memory-related issues in C++. It's far more useful than fixing a specific instance of this error, because all that's going to happen is that he'll make another, similar error, and have the same problem again. –  Puppy Jan 27 '13 at 10:36
    
Wrong, many people here are under the assumption that the only thing they should do is to teach Modern C++. An OP comes to SO with a specific question from a particular angle ("What's wrong with this code? Why doesn't it work?"), and you should tune the answer to his (wrong) perspective before leading him to yours. I don't think that pretending that raw pointers, new, and delete don't exist is a good attitude. He may have been given an assignment asking to use them; he may be curious how they work (what, one shouldn't be allowed to know how shared_ptr is realized)? And so on and on. –  Andy Prowl Jan 27 '13 at 12:34
    
I appreciate the help here, however, I will agree with Andy on this one -- I understand that using smart pointers might be a better long term option when writing real code, however, I am really interested in nailing down the fundamentals before relying on something like this to do the work for me. –  nmio Jan 27 '13 at 14:41

Make the following modification

struct node {
    int data;
    node *next;
    node():next(NULL){} //just to be safe
    ~node(){if(next != NULL) delete next;} 
}; 

The problems is that you only delete the root and not the other elements. This change will make sure that when you delete a node, it will delete the next node as well, if it exists.

Not the most conventional of solutions, but rather elegant in its own way.. (might cause stack issues if list is too long though, a while loop as shown by ppetrov doesnt have this issue, or is it tail recursive?)

You should also fix the other superfluous deletes that have been mentioned by others.

This implementation is close to a concept called Resource Acquisition Is Initialization, which is a concept that helps smart pointers, and other parts of the library, work.

share|improve this answer
    
I have implemented this as well as fixing the deltes for trav and tmp. I am still seeing increased real memory usage from the processes running this code -- any reason why this would be the case? I have added some terminal output to the destructor to see whether or not nodes are being deleted and they are - Despite this, memory consumption continues to remain high. –  nmio Jan 27 '13 at 14:27
    
Sorry, this actually worked perfectly. Error was introduced by a missing pair of brackets in my code... Oops! –  nmio Jan 27 '13 at 16:38
    
@nmio I am glad I could help. Please feel free to accept this answer if it has solved your question. Also take a look at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resource_Acquisition_Is_Initialization This is a more generalized version of what I have done here. It should be a useful read for you, it is a fundamental concept in C++ and is used by much of the standard library including the smart pointers. –  Karthik T Jan 27 '13 at 16:54

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