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I'm looking at the source code for this http://raphaeljs.com/australia.html example, and trying to interpret what has been done in order to create a similar project using the RaphaelJS graphics library.

I am, however, confused about part of the code. Specifically, the author uses a parameter "st" in a function inside a for loop, that has not been defined before, while the second parameter "state" has. I'm not sure what I'm missing, but can someone please explain what's going on here? Is this a generic parameter or a call to something specific?

for (var state in aus) {
            aus[state].color = Raphael.getColor();
            (function (st, state) {
                st[0].style.cursor = "pointer";
                st[0].onmouseover = function () {
                    current && aus[current].animate({fill: "#333", stroke: "#666"}, 500) && (document.getElementById(current).style.display = "");
                    st.animate({fill: st.color, stroke: "#ccc"}, 500);
                    st.toFront();
                    R.safari();
                    document.getElementById(state).style.display = "block";
                    current = state;
                };
                st[0].onmouseout = function () {
                    st.animate({fill: "#333", stroke: "#666"}, 500);
                    st.toFront();
                    R.safari();
                };
                if (state == "nsw") {
                    st[0].onmouseover();
                }
            })(aus[state], state);
        }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

st is a named parameter of the surrounding closure:

(function (st, state) {
    // ...
})(aus[state], state);

This is known as an Immediately-Invoked Function Expression (often called Self-Executing Block or a Temporary Scope) used to "save" a state by extracting code from the surrounding context.

In order to introduce variables from outside the closure, one can pass them to the trailing parentheses as arguments (here aus[state], state), and name them in the function's signature (here st, state).

References

Further Reading

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The function is called with the values aus[state] and state (look at the second last line). So it equivalent to:

for (var state in aus) {
        aus[state].color = Raphael.getColor();

        var st = aus[state]; // This line replaces the function

        st[0].style.cursor = "pointer";
        st[0].onmouseover = function () {
            current && aus[current].animate({fill: "#333", stroke: "#666"}, 500) && (document.getElementById(current).style.display = "");
            st.animate({fill: st.color, stroke: "#ccc"}, 500);
            st.toFront();
            R.safari();
            document.getElementById(state).style.display = "block";
            current = state;
        };

        st[0].onmouseout = function () {
            st.animate({fill: "#333", stroke: "#666"}, 500);
            st.toFront();
            R.safari();
        };

        if (state == "nsw") {
            st[0].onmouseover();
        }
    }
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+1 The name of the pattern in the original code is "IIFE" : benalman.com/news/2010/11/… –  Sebastian Jan 26 '13 at 17:46

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