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This is a sample line from my file:

42001232  2011-07-01  51  100001  0  100002  0  2011-07-02  51  100003  0  100004  0

How do I arrange it to look like this

42001232  2011-07-01  51  100001  0
42001232  2011-07-01  51  100002  0
42001232  2011-07-02  51  100003  0
42001232  2011-07-02  51  100004  0

Apart from the first column, all the columns are repeating starting with a date. I need to organize it in a tabular form. Also, the delimiter here is TAB.

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closed as too localized by George Stocker Jan 28 '13 at 13:39

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
whathaveyoutried.com –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 26 '13 at 17:44
    
So what does your script look like? –  JakeGould Jan 26 '13 at 17:44
    
sorry, I updated the question. I gave incorrect information at first. So far, what i've tried is this: sed "s:\t([0-9]\{4\}-[0-9]\{2\}-[0-9]\{2\}):\n\1:g. And each line looked like this: 2011-07-01 51 100001 0 100002 0 –  dev-aldwin Jan 26 '13 at 18:02
    
What does 51 mean? would different values instead of 51 be possible in it's place of is is locked at 51? –  Faiz Jan 26 '13 at 18:06
    
@Faiz 51 is just another id (integer). It could be any other value. –  dev-aldwin Jan 26 '13 at 18:09

2 Answers 2

Here's one way using awk. Run like:

awk -f script.awk file

Contents of script.awk:

BEGIN {
    FS=OFS="\t"
}
{
    for(i=2;i<=NF;i++) {
        if ($i ~ /^[0-9]{4}-[0-9]{2}-[0-9]{2}$/) {
            for (j=i+2;j<=NF;j+=2) {
                if ($j ~ /^[0-9]{4}-[0-9]{2}-[0-9]{2}$/) {
                    break
                }
                else {
                    print $1, $i, $(i+1), $j, $(j+1)
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Results:

42001232    2011-07-01  51  100001  0
42001232    2011-07-01  51  100002  0
42001232    2011-07-02  51  100003  0
42001232    2011-07-02  51  100004  0

Alternatively, here's the one-liner:

awk 'BEGIN { FS=OFS="\t" } { for(i=2;i<=NF;i++) if ($i ~ /^[0-9]{4}-[0-9]{2}-[0-9]{2}$/) for (j=i+2;j<=NF;j+=2) if ($j ~ /^[0-9]{4}-[0-9]{2}-[0-9]{2}$/) break; else print $1, $i, $(i+1), $j, $(j+1) }' file
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This works on the given data:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use English qw( -no_match_vars );

$OFS = qq"\t";

while (<>)
{
    chomp;
    my(@fields) = split /\s+/, $_;
    my $col1 = shift @fields;
    my $date = shift @fields;
    my $col3 = shift @fields;
    while (scalar(@fields) > 1)
    {
        if ($fields[0] =~ /^\d{4}-\d\d-\d\d$/)
        {
            $date = shift @fields;
            $col3 = shift @fields;
            next;
        }
        else
        {
            my $col4 = shift @fields;
            my $col5 = shift @fields;
            print $col1, $date, $col3, $col4, "$col5\n";
        }
    }
    print STDERR "oops - debris $fields[0] left over\n" if (scalar(@fields) != 0);
}

The output I got is:

42001232        2011-07-01      51      100001  0
42001232        2011-07-01      51      100002  0
42001232        2011-07-02      51      100003  0
42001232        2011-07-02      51      100004  0

That's a perfectly horrid format to have to parse. I've had to make some assumptions about the way the repetitions are handled, so that the column after a date is fixed until the next date, for example.

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