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Suppose I want to plot x^2. I can use curve() as follows.

curve(x^2, -5, 5)

enter image description here However, I would like the axes to go through (0, 0). I could do something as follows:

curve(x^2, -5, 5, axes=FALSE)
axis(1, pos=0)
axis(2, pos=0)
abline(h=0)
abline(v=0)

And I end up getting something like below, which looks OK. But the only gripe I have is that this way of plotting axes makes the actual axes - for example the segment between -4 and 4 of the x-axis - thicker than the segments to the right side and the left side. The same goes with the y axis. I wonder if there is a better way of plotting the axes. Thank you!

enter image description here

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Why do you want to make your plots look like the ones Excel produces? –  Gavin Simpson Jan 26 '13 at 19:13
    
@GavinSimpson: Ha! I actually didn't know Excel made plots that looked this way. Rarely use Excel for plotting purposes. For my data, the (0, 0) is important, so I thought letting the axes cross this point would make more sense. –  Alex Jan 26 '13 at 19:58
    
The answer you checked is great; just thought I'd throw this option in: do the default plot, and then add identifier lines wherever you want them, e.g. lines(c(0,0), c(-1,10),lty=4) for a y-axis at x=0 –  Carl Witthoft Jan 26 '13 at 20:46
1  
@Alex IMHO I think the default R output is much better (no axis in the middle of the important data, tick labels not obscured by data or other axes, ...). If (0,0) is important, I would just add a lightgrey line using abline(v = 0) and abline(h = 0) calls, preferably in the background. –  Gavin Simpson Jan 26 '13 at 21:02
1  
@gavin -- sounds like what I wrote :-) –  Carl Witthoft Jan 26 '13 at 23:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

By default, axis() computes automatically the tick marks position, but you can define them manually with the at argument. So a workaround could be something like :

curve(x^2, -5, 5, axes=FALSE)
axis(1, pos=0, at=-5:5)
axis(2, pos=0)

Which gives :

enter image description here

The problem is that you have to manually determine the position of each tick mark. A slightly better solution would be to compute them with the axTicks function (the one used by default) but calling this one with a custom axp argument which allows you to specify respectively the minimum, maximum and number of intervals for the ticks in the axis :

curve(x^2, -5, 5, axes=FALSE)
axis(1, pos=0, at=axTicks(1,axp=c(-10,10,10)))
axis(2, pos=0)

Which gives :

enter image description here

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The arguments yaxs and xaxs control spacing around plots. Set to "i" to omit this:

curve(x^2, -5, 5, yaxs = "i")

See also: http://stackoverflow.com/a/12300673/567015

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This option trims at both ends, not just at (0,0) with bad side-effects for some plots, e.g. plot with a lot of data points spread flat near the top, as with a bell-shaped curve. Also, for some reasons, the axis will overwrite the dots/lines, making data near the ends hard to see. –  PatrickT Mar 18 '13 at 8:06

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