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I'm pretty new to SQL and am struggling with a query (using Access, FWIW). I have Googled and searched StackOverflow, but I haven't seen this exact scenario. (That could also be because I don't know the correct search terms.)

I have two pretty simple tables that contain similar data.

table1: state, lname, fname, network
table2: state, lname, fname, network

What I want is to find each person/state combo that match in the two tables plus the networks from each table that the person is in:

state, lname, fname, t1.network, t2.network.  

The person may be in more than one network in each table. I want to see each network (from both tables) that the person belongs to.

I started by using a JOIN as below:

SELECT t1.state, t1.lname, t1.fname, t1.network, t2.network
FROM t1 INNER JOIN t2 
ON t1.fname=t2.fname AND t1.lname=t2.lname AND t1.state=t2.state
GROUP BY t1.state, t1.lname, t1.fname, t1.network, t2.network

I quickly figured out that I get a Cartesian product. So if "NY, Smith, John" was in two networks in t1 and three networks in t2 I would get something like this:

NY, Smith, John, NetworkA, NetworkB
NY, Smith, John, NetworkA, NetworkA
NY, Smith, John, NetworkB, NetworkA
NY, Smith, John, NetworkB, NetworkB
NY, Smith, John, NetworkA, NetworkC
NY, Smith, John, NetworkB, NetworkC

What I really want to see is just:

NY, Smith, John, NetworkA, NetworkA
NY, Smith, John, NetworkB, NetworkB
NY, Smith, John, NULL, NetworkC

Can anyone give me some advice on how to proceed or point me in the right direction?

share|improve this question
    
I'm afraid this scenario will pretty much always leave you with a result like this. Try splitting the query in two parts: Part one -> State, Last Name and First name. Once you've got that data, ask these people for the networks they're in. To do that, you ought to use an ID of sorts. (Because there really could be more than one John Smith from New York) –  Refugnic Eternium Jan 26 '13 at 19:36
1  
These tables, quite frankly, are a mess. Normalize them. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa216117(v=sql.80).aspx –  flup Jan 26 '13 at 19:40
4  
why have two tables with exact same columns and duplicate data? –  Aniket Jan 26 '13 at 19:40
1  
You are not really doing a Cartesian product; you are doing an INNER JOIN. The ON clause controls how the tables are combined. In the future, please include the complete table definition in your questions (the CREATE TABLE part). That will help people help you. And Welcome to StackOverflow! –  BellevueBob Jan 26 '13 at 19:43
    
@BobDuell every join starts off with a cartesian product before filtering the joins according to where condition –  Aniket Jan 26 '13 at 19:43
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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

So it looks like you want all records from each of tables that are identical, and then only those from each that are distinct. That means you need to UNION 3 sets of queries.

Try something like this:

SELECT t1.state, 
   t1.lname, 
   t1.fname, 
   t1.network as t1Network, 
   t2.network as t2Network
FROM table1 t1 
   INNER JOIN table2 t2 
      ON t1.fname=t2.fname 
      AND t1.lname=t2.lname 
      AND t1.state=t2.state
      AND t1.network=t2.network
UNION 
SELECT t1.state, 
   t1.lname, 
   t1.fname, 
   t1.network as t1Network, 
   t2.network as t2Network
FROM table1 t1 
   LEFT JOIN table2 t2 
      ON t1.fname=t2.fname 
      AND t1.lname=t2.lname 
      AND t1.state=t2.state
      AND t1.network=t2.network
WHERE t2.network IS NULL
UNION 
SELECT t2.state, 
   t2.lname, 
   t2.fname, 
   t1.network as t1Network, 
   t2.network as t2Network
FROM table2 t2 
   LEFT JOIN table1 t1
      ON t1.fname=t2.fname 
      AND t1.lname=t2.lname 
      AND t1.state=t2.state
      AND t1.network=t2.network
WHERE t1.network IS NULL

This should give you your desired results.

And here is the SQL Fiddle to confirm.

--EDIT

Not thinking today -- you don't really need that first query. You can remove the WHERE condition from the 2nd query and it works the same way. Tired :-)

Here is the updated query -- both should work just fine though, this is just easier to read:

SELECT t1.state, 
   t1.lname, 
   t1.fname, 
   t1.network as t1Network, 
   t2.network as t2Network
FROM table1 t1 
   LEFT JOIN table2 t2 
      ON t1.fname=t2.fname 
      AND t1.lname=t2.lname 
      AND t1.state=t2.state
      AND t1.network=t2.network
UNION 
SELECT t2.state, 
   t2.lname, 
   t2.fname, 
   t1.network as t1Network, 
   t2.network as t2Network
FROM table2 t2 
   LEFT JOIN table1 t1
      ON t1.fname=t2.fname 
      AND t1.lname=t2.lname 
      AND t1.state=t2.state
      AND t1.network=t2.network
WHERE t1.network IS NULL

And the updated fiddle.

BTW -- these should both work in MSAccess as it supports UNION.

Good luck.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. This did the trick! –  user2014025 Jan 27 '13 at 5:41
    
Sorry for the late comment - here is my question why do we need the WHERE clause at very end? i.e. "WHERE t1.network IS NULL" - Even without using that WHERE clause we get the same result. Thus,is it not unnecessary? –  javauser71 Sep 6 '13 at 19:03
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SELECT DISTINCT t1.state, t1.lname, t1.fname, t1.network, t2.network
FROM t1 INNER JOIN t2 
ON t1.fname=t2.fname AND t1.lname=t2.lname AND t1.state=t2.state
GROUP BY t1.state, t1.lname, t1.fname, t1.network, t2.network

and you get what you want.

Almost every join starts off building a cartesian product anyway(see Inside SQL Server: Querying book). When you try to filter out the data, usually, the virtual tables created will return a distinct set when you use a distinct. In reality, there is no stoping the cartesian product.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. It appears DISTINCT doesn't really make a difference in this case though. I don't see a difference when I use your query. –  user2014025 Jan 26 '13 at 20:47
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In this case, a UNION should be your best bet:

SELECT * FROM t1
UNION
SELECT * FROM t2

(Note that this query should only work as is if all the columns in both tables are of the same type, in the same order - otherwise it's better to specify each required column, rather than using SELECT *).

share|improve this answer
    
easy way of joining two tables, same plan of execution taken by SQL server though. –  Aniket Jan 26 '13 at 19:38
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What you want is a UNION.

I'd create a query (in SQL view) to the effect of:

SELECT state, lname, fname, network, network
FROM t1
UNION ALL
SELECT state, lname, fname, network, network
FROM t2

Then I would create other queries that query that one.

I'd try it myself to give you more details, but I don't have MS Access installed.

share|improve this answer
    
you can install MS Access or SQL Server, or mysql even.. it says GENERIC "SQL" - you don't really need MS Access :-) –  Aniket Jan 26 '13 at 19:46
    
But I would need Windows first.. :) –  Paulb Jan 27 '13 at 2:26
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One option is to use a full outer join:

SELECT coalesce(t1.state, t2.state), coalesce(t1.lname, t2.lname), coalesce(t1.fname, t2.fname),
  t1.network, t2.network
FROM t1 FULL OUTER JOIN t2 
ON t1.fname=t2.fname AND t1.lname=t2.lname AND t1.state=t2.state
and t1.network = t2.network

Output:

NY  SMITH   JOHN    A   A
NY  SMITH   JOHN    B   B
NY  SMITH   JOHN    NULL    C  

Edit: I didn't see you are using Access - this is standard SQL, but I don't know if it will work there.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. FULL OUTER JOIN is not supported by Access, but I can get around that by using separate OUTER JOINs and using UNION to tie them together, as sgeddes suggested below. –  user2014025 Jan 27 '13 at 5:43
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