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The below program tests for Little/Big endian on intel processor. Actually little endian is correct output. First I am casting int to char* and accessing its value without initialization to int *.I am not understanding second part of output. Here int pointer is casted to char *. So why is not int pointer not changed its alignment to char *?

00000000 00000000 00000011 01111111 = 895
0        0         3       127

int main() {
    int num = 895;
    if(*(char *)&num == 127)
    {
        printf("\nLittle-Endian\n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("Big-Endian\n");
    }

    int *p = (char *)&num ;
    if(*p == 127)
    {
        printf("\nLittle-Endian\n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("Big-Endian\n");
    }
    printf("%d\n",*p);
}

o/p

Little-Endian
Big-Endian
895
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What do you think cast does? –  Hot Licks Jan 26 '13 at 19:54
1  
Formatting your code better will help people understand what's going on. –  Carl Norum Jan 26 '13 at 19:54
2  
The return type of main shall be int. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 26 '13 at 19:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. The first half of your program using this comparison:

    if(*(char *)&num == 127)
    

    looks fine.

  2. The second half of your program contains this assignment:

    int *p = (char *)&num ;
    

    Which isn't valid code. You can't convert pointer types without an explicit cast. In this case, your compiler might be letting you get away with it, but strictly speaking, it's incorrect. This line should read:

    int *p = (int *)(char *)#
    

    or simply this equivalent statement:

    int *p = #
    

    From this example, I'm sure you can see why your second test doesn't work the way you'd like it to - you're still operating on the whole int, not on the single byte you were interested in. If you made p a char *, it would work the way you expected:

    char *p = (char *)#
    
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1  
+1. Worth a mention that perhaps @Goutham intended to write char *p = (char *)&num in the second case? –  s.bandara Jan 26 '13 at 19:58
1  
@s.bandara, that might be what's going on. But I don't understand why he'd do that when that is semantically identical to the first half of the program. Maybe if he was just trying to do it two ways? –  Carl Norum Jan 26 '13 at 20:00
    
"You can't convert pointer types without an explicit cast." - To be pedantic, you pointers to void can be safely and implicitly converted to any pointer type. –  Ed S. Jan 26 '13 at 20:03
    
@Ed, true, but that's an exception, and not the case here. –  Carl Norum Jan 26 '13 at 20:05

Can int pointer be cast to char *?

Yes, it's only the inverse that would invoke undefined behavior, more precisely, using the result of a cast from char * to int * (since char is 1-byte aligned, so any data pointer type can safely be cast to char *).

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1  
Casting char* to int* doesn't invoke UB. Using the result of that cast may invoke UB. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 26 '13 at 19:57
    
@DanielFischer Yes, true. –  user529758 Jan 26 '13 at 19:58

A pointer just shows a location in memory. No matter the type of the pointer it types to the given location in the memory, so when you cast to character and back to integer pointer, nothing changes.

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