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I am making an attendance system and it consist of a time schedule that is in between two dates like for example (10:00pm to 3:00am). How do i retrieve rows from mysql database that has a time range that are in between 2 dates?

I already know how to use BETWEEN in mysql, my problem is how do I query mysql without knowing the exact time range? because it could be anything like it could be (11:00pm to 4:00am)

I am using 3 table: time_tbl: stores information about employee's time schedule (e.g. 10pm to 3am) date_tbl: stores information about employee's date schedule (e.g. Monday, Tuesday, etc.) time_date_tbl: is a junction table, with time and date schedule of an employee taken from the table time_tbl and date_tbl.

    time_tbl
    --------------------------------
    |  ID  |  Start    |  End      |
    --------------------------------
    |  1   |  22:00:00 |  03:00:00 |
    |  2   |  23:00:00 |  04:00:00 |
    |  3   |  08:00:00 |  11:00:00 |
    |  4   |  13:00:00 |  17:00:00 |
    --------------------------------

    date_tbl
    ---------------------
    |  ID  |  Days      |
    ---------------------
    |  1   |  Monday    |
    |  2   |  Tuesday   |
    |  3   |  Wednesday |
    ---------------------

    time_date_tbl
    -------------------------------------
    |  emp_id  |  time_id    |  date_id |
    -------------------------------------
    |  1       |  1          |  1       |
    |  1       |  1          |  2       |
    |  2       |  1          |  1       |
    |  3       |  3          |  1       |
    |  4       |  4          |  1       |
    |  4       |  1          |  1       |
    -------------------------------------

I want to query mysql so that i would retrieve data (for example today is Monday) i want to retrieve records that has a date equal today "which is Monday" and also include records like 10:00pm to 3:00am where 10pm was on a Sunday, a day before Monday...

    desired result:
    -----------------------------------------------
    |  emp_id  |  time                 |  date    |
    -----------------------------------------------
    |  1       |  22:00:00 - 03:00:00  |  ?       | <-- started @ Sunday 10pm
    |  2       |  22:00:00 - 03:00:00  |  ?       | <-- started @ Sunday 10pm
    |  3       |  08:00:00 - 11:00:00  |  Monday  |
    |  4       |  13:00:00 - 17:00:00  |  Monday  | 
    |  4       |  22:00:00 - 03:00:00  |  ?       | <-- started @ Sunday 10pm
    -----------------------------------------------

Is there some kind of a "Date Crosser" function/algorithm in mysql to get this job done?...

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1  
Good. And, for completeness, what would the expected result set look like. –  Strawberry Jan 26 '13 at 20:31
1  
Please add create table statements and insert statements in the question. –  kjtl Jan 26 '13 at 20:33
    
I suggest using an explicit time interval in time_tbl and then derive the end time. –  kjtl Jan 26 '13 at 22:47

4 Answers 4

Thanks for updating the question with more information. If you want to query by day and have the time ranges returned... Your tables will make this a little complicated...

SELECT tdt.emp_id,CONCAT(DATE_FORMAT(tt.Start,'%H:%m:%s'),' - ',DATE_FORMAT(tt.End,'%H:%m:%s')),dt.Days
FROM time_date_tbl tdt INNER JOIN date_tbl dt ON (tdt.date_id=dt.`ID`) INNER JOIN time_tbl tt ON (tt.`ID`=tdt.time_id)
WHERE dt.ID=1

Now what I don't see above is an actual date field with a date... to put that another way the query above would list off all Mondays... ever. You may need to add more to the WHERE section to limit it more.

Now if this is a newer project and you still have the ability to restructure... if time_tbl is an id along with two dates - a start datetime and an end datetime you really wouldn't need the rest of the tables:

SELECT emp_id,CONCAT(DATE_FORMAT(tt.Start,'%H:%m:%s'),' - ',DATE_FORMAT(tt.End,'%H:%m:%s'))
FROM time_tbl tt
WHERE (DATE_FORMAT('%w',tt.Start)=1) OR (DATE_FORMAT('%w',tt.End)=1)

Again this would list all Mondays. You can add to the where to limit it more.

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Try this:

WHERE scheduleStartDate >= givenStartDate
     AND scheduleEndDate <= givenEndDate
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An example.

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `datetime`;

CREATE TABLE `datetime` (
  `id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `datetime` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

INSERT INTO `datetime` (`id`, `datetime`)
VALUES
    (1,'2013-01-27 08:00:00'),
    (2,'2013-01-27 10:00:00'),
    (3,'2013-01-27 12:00:00'),
    (4,'2013-01-27 13:00:00');

select * from `datetime` where `datetime` >= '2013-01-27 10:00:00' and `datetime` <= '2013-01-27 12:00:00'

-- results
2   2013-01-27 10:00:00
3   2013-01-27 12:00:00
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The main problem is there are no time intervals to search on.

The following code creates internal time intervals to search on.

DROP VIEW IF EXISTS    `time_view` ;
DROP VIEW IF EXISTS    `employee_schedule_view` ;
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `employee_schedule`;
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `day`;   
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `time`;

CREATE TABLE `time` (
  `id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `employee_id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `start_time` time DEFAULT NULL,
  `hours` int(11) DEFAULT '0',
  `minutes` int(11) DEFAULT '0',
  `seconds` int(11) DEFAULT '0',
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

INSERT INTO `time` (`id`, `employee_id`, `start_time`, `hours`, `minutes`, `seconds`)
VALUES
    (1,1,'22:00:00',5,0,0),
    (2,2,'23:00:00',5,0,0),
    (3,3,'08:00:00',3,0,0),
    (4,4,'13:00:00',4,0,0),
    (5,5,'17:00:00',24,0,0),
    (6,6,'23:00:00',26,0,0);

/* create a time view that contains interval information */
create or replace view time_view as 
select 
    id as time_id
,    start_time
-- calculate the time interval
,   SEC_TO_TIME( hours * 3600 +  minutes * 60  + seconds ) `interval`
-- calculate the time if we assume time is contiguous
,    SEC_TO_TIME( ( hour(start_time) + hours ) * 3600 + ( minute(start_time) + minutes) * 60 + second(start_time) + seconds ) contiguous_time
-- modulate to the number of seconds in a day to get the end time suitable for humans to read
,  SEC_TO_TIME((( hour(start_time) + hours ) * 3600 + ( minute(start_time) + minutes) * 60 + second(start_time) + seconds ) % 86400 ) end_time
,  floor( (( hour(start_time) + hours ) * 3600 + ( minute(start_time) + minutes) * 60 + second(start_time) + seconds ) / 86400 ) dayOffset
from `time` ;

CREATE TABLE `day` (
  `id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `name` varchar(15) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

INSERT INTO `day` (`id`, `name`)
VALUES
    (0,'Monday'),
    (1,'Tuesday'),
    (2,'Wednesday'),
    (3,'Thursday'),
    (4,'Friday'),
    (5,'Saturday'),
    (6,'Sunday');


CREATE TABLE `employee_schedule` (
  `id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `employee_id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `time_id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `day_id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `time_id` (`time_id`),
  KEY `day_id` (`day_id`),
  CONSTRAINT `employee_schedule_ibfk_2` FOREIGN KEY (`day_id`) REFERENCES `day` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT `employee_schedule_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`time_id`) REFERENCES `time` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

INSERT INTO `employee_schedule` (`id`, `employee_id`, `time_id`, `day_id`)
VALUES
    (1,1,1,0),
    (2,1,1,1),
    (3,2,1,0),
    (4,3,3,0),
    (5,4,4,0),
    (6,4,1,0),
    (7,5,1,5),
    (8,4,5,6),
    (9,3,6,6),
    (10,6,6,1);

/* create an employee view that has interval information */
create or replace view employee_schedule_view as
select  schedules.id schedules_id
, employee_id
, day_id as start_day_id
, start_days.name as start_day_name
, `start_time`
, `interval`
, `contiguous_time`
, `end_time`
, `end_days`.`id` as end_day_id
, `end_days`.name as end_day_name
-- some starting point - note the date is incorrect - it is merely here to define a starting point of the interval
,  timestamp( concat( date_format( date_add( date( now() ), interval `day_id` day ), '%Y-%m-%d' ) , ' ' , start_time )) `internal_start`
-- some ending point - note the date is incorrect - it is merel here to define an ending point of the interval
,  addtime( timestamp( concat( date_format( date_add( date( now() ), interval `day_id` day ), '%Y-%m-%d' ) , ' ' , `start_time` )) , `interval` ) `internal_finish`
from `employee_schedule` `schedules`
inner join `day` `start_days`
on `schedules`.`day_id` = `start_days`.id
inner join `time_view` `times`
on `schedules`.`time_id` = `times`.`time_id`
inner join `day` `end_days`
-- use mod to allow for instance when the start day is 'after' the end day -- think about sunday
on `end_days`.`id` = ( `start_days`.id + `times`.dayOffset ) % 7

once there is support for intervals the following sql can be easily run ... and understood.

-- example
-- find who is working at 11:00 on a Wednesday
set @dayID := 2 ;
set @time := '11:00:00' ;
select employee_schedule_view.schedules_id
, employee_schedule_view.employee_id
, employee_schedule_view.start_day_name
, employee_schedule_view.start_time
, employee_schedule_view.interval
, employee_schedule_view.end_time
, employee_schedule_view.end_day_name
from `employee_schedule_view` 
inner join
(
    select concat( date_format( date_add( date(now()), interval @dayID day ), '%Y-%m-%d' ), ' ', @time) internal_check
) internal_check
where 
internal_check.internal_check >= internal_start
and internal_check.internal_check <= internal_finish 
;

-- find who is working at 23:00 on a Monday
set @dayID := 0 ;
set @time := '23:00:00' ;
select employee_schedule_view.schedules_id
, employee_schedule_view.employee_id
, employee_schedule_view.start_day_name
, employee_schedule_view.start_time
, employee_schedule_view.interval
, employee_schedule_view.end_time
, employee_schedule_view.end_day_name
from `employee_schedule_view` 
inner join
(
    select concat( date_format( date_add( date(now()), interval @dayID day ), '%Y-%m-%d' ), ' ', @time) internal_check
) internal_check
where 
internal_check.internal_check >= internal_start
and internal_check.internal_check <= internal_finish 
;

-- example results
1   1   Monday  22:00:00    05:00:00    03:00:00    Tuesday
3   2   Monday  22:00:00    05:00:00    03:00:00    Tuesday
6   4   Monday  22:00:00    05:00:00    03:00:00    Tuesday
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