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Write a method rem() that takes as input a list containing, possibly, duplicate values and returns a copy of the list in which one copy of every duplicate value removed.

> rem([4])
[]

> rem([4, 4])
[4]

> rem([4, 1, 3, 2])
[]

> rem([2, 4, 2, 4, 4])
[2, 4, 4]

How do I go about doing this? Do I make a new list that contains the duplicates?

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closed as too localized by plaes, Mark Bell, luke, Firoze Lafeer, jcwenger Apr 25 '13 at 15:57

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2  
You didn't even bother to rewrite the question... –  flup Jan 26 '13 at 20:37
    
It does not look like you even tried to find a solution by yourself. –  Rodrigue Jan 26 '13 at 20:40
2  
The question in the title (return a list of duplicate values) is not the same as the question in the body (remove one of each duplicate value), and the behaviour you've shown in the example (remove one of every value, regardless of whether it is a duplicate) does not match either of the two. You're going to need to get a clearer understanding of what you actually want to achieve to get anything out of this. As an aside, the fact that 7 people have each cheerfully taken a guess at which of your three separate questions you really meant and given answers amuses me. –  Mark Amery Jan 26 '13 at 20:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
def rem(a):
    copy = a[:]
    for value in set(copy):
        copy.remove(value)
    return copy
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except this is n^2 –  jterrace Jan 26 '13 at 21:01

You can use a collections.Counter for this:

import collections
def rem(a):
   new_list = []
   for key, count in collections.Counter(a).iteritems():
      if count > 1:
         new_list.extend([key] * (count-1))
   return new_list

With your examples:

>>> rem([4])
[]
>>> rem([4, 4]) 
[4]
>>> rem([4, 1, 3, 2])
[]
>>> rem([2, 4, 2, 4, 4])
[2, 4, 4]
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l = [1,2,2,3,4]
for item in set(l):
    l.remove(item)
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1  
Don't really understand the downvote here. I've checked this code and it allows the OP to do exactly what they want to do. –  Garry Cairns Jan 26 '13 at 20:49
    
The OP effectively asked three separate questions (one in the title, one in the body, one in the example) with different requirements, as I noted in my comment on the question. Chances are that you and your downvoter interpreted the question in different ways. –  Mark Amery Jan 26 '13 at 20:58

collections.Counter was a good idea, try this:

import collections
def rem(l):
    newlist = []
    for k, v in collections.Counter(l).iteritems():
        newlist += [k] * (v - 1)
    return newlist

print rem([4])
print rem([4, 4])
print rem([4, 1, 3, 2])
print rem([2, 4, 2, 4, 4])
[]
[4]
[]
[2, 4, 4]
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This is clearly a homework problem, and the question asker is clearly new to programming and doesn't have the confidence to figure out an approach of his own. Why provide solutions that use Python-specific tools and constructs, like the collections module or multiplication of lists? That doesn't seem to me like it can possibly be the best way for the OP to learn. There are more language-agnostic approaches to this that are less intimidating and that it would be more useful for a programming newbie to see. –  Mark Amery Jan 26 '13 at 20:42
1  
@MarkAmery If the OP did not want tangible, practical, and fully functioning code, then StackOverflow was not the right place to ask. In the days of the homework tag, your comment would be more valid, but that tag has since been deprecated. –  arshajii Jan 26 '13 at 20:43
1  
+1 The answer is a thing of beauty. And the teacher will laugh hard when it gets handed in. –  flup Jan 26 '13 at 20:58

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