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The default Rails 4 project generator now creates the directory "concerns" under controllers and models. I have found some explanations about how to use routing concerns, but nothing about controllers or models.

I am pretty sure it has to do with the current "DCI trend" in the community and would like to give it a try.

The question is, how am I supposed to use this feature, is there a convention on how to define the naming / class hierarchy in order to make it work? How can I include a concern in a model or controller?

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up vote 433 down vote accepted

So I found it out by myself. It is actually a pretty simple but powerful concept. It has to do with code reuse as in the example below. Basically, the idea is to extract common and / or context specific chunks of code in order to clean up the models and avoid them getting too fat and messy.

As an example, I'll put one well known pattern, the taggable pattern:

# app/models/product.rb
class Product
  include Taggable

  ...
end

# app/models/concerns/taggable.rb
# notice that the file name has to match the module name 
# (applying Rails conventions for autoloading)
module Taggable
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern

  included do
    has_many :taggings, as: :taggable
    has_many :tags, through: :taggings

    class_attribute :tag_limit
  end

  def tags_string
    tags.map(&:name).join(', ')
  end

  def tags_string=(tag_string)
    tag_names = tag_string.to_s.split(', ')

    tag_names.each do |tag_name|
      tags.build(name: tag_name)
    end
  end

  # methods defined here are going to extend the class, not the instance of it
  module ClassMethods

    def tag_limit(value)
      self.tag_limit_value = value
    end

  end

end

So following the Product sample, you can add Taggable to any class you desire and share its functionality.

This is pretty well explained by DHH:

In Rails 4, we’re going to invite programmers to use concerns with the default app/models/concerns and app/controllers/concerns directories that are automatically part of the load path. Together with the ActiveSupport::Concern wrapper, it’s just enough support to make this light-weight factoring mechanism shine.

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10  
DCI deals with a Context, uses Roles as identifiers to map a mental model/use case to code, and requires no wrappers to be used (methods are bound directly to the object at runtime) so this has nothing to do with DCI really. – ciscoheat Feb 26 '13 at 5:59
2  
@yagooar even including it at runtime wouldn't make it DCI. If you wish to see a ruby DCI example implementation. Take a look at either fulloo.info or the examples at github.com/runefs/Moby or for how to use maroon to do DCI in Ruby and what DCI is runefs.com (What DCI is. is a series of post I've just started recently) – Rune FS Feb 26 '13 at 10:42
1  
@RuneFS && ciscoheat you were both right. I just analyzed the articles and facts again. And, I went last weekend to a Ruby conference where one talk was about DCI and finally I understood a little bit more about its philosophy. Changed the text so it doesn't mention DCI at all. – yagooar Mar 10 '13 at 18:53
7  
It is worth mentioning (and probably including in an example) that class methods are supposed to be defined in a specially named module ClassMethods, and that this module is extended by the base class be ActiveSupport::Concern, too. – febeling Sep 17 '13 at 7:10
1  
Thank you for this example, mainly b/c I was being dumb and defining my Class level methods inside of the ClassMethods module with self.whatever still, and that doesn't work =P – Ryan Crews Oct 28 '13 at 18:24

I have been reading about using model concerns to skin-nize fat models as well as DRY up your model codes. Here is an explanation with examples:

1) DRYing up model codes

Consider a Article model, a Event model and a Comment model. An article or an event has many comments. A comment belongs to either Article or Event.

Traditionally, the models may look like this:

Comment Model:

class Comment < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :commentable, polymorphic: true
end

Article Model:

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :comments, as: :commentable 

  def find_first_comment
    comments.first(created_at DESC)
  end

  def self.least_commented
   #return the article with least number of comments
  end
end

Event Model

class Event < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :comments, as: :commentable 

  def find_first_comment
    comments.first(created_at DESC)
  end

  def self.least_commented
   #returns the event with least number of comments
  end
end

As we can notice, there is a significant piece of code common to both Event and Article. Using concerns we can extract this common code in a separate module Commentable.

For this create a commentable.rb file in app/model/concerns.

module Commentable
    extend ActiveSupport::Concern

    included do 
        has_many :comments, as: :commentable 
    end

    # for the given article/event returns the first comment
    def find_first_comment
        comments.first(created_at DESC)
    end

    module ClassMethods     
        def least_commented
           #returns the article/event which has the least number of comments
        end
    end 
end

And Now your models look like this :

Comment Model:

    class Comment < ActiveRecord::Base
      belongs_to :commentable, polymorphic: true
    end

Article Model:

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
    include Commentable
end

Event Model:

class Event < ActiveRecord::Base    
    include Commentable
end

2) Skin-nizing Fat Models.

Consider a Event model. A event has many attenders and comments.

Typically, the event model might look like this

 class Event < ActiveRecord::Base   
    has_many :comments
    has_many :attenders


    def find_first_comment
        # for the given article/event returns the first comment
    end

    def find_comments_with_word(word)
        # for the given event returns an array of comments which contain the given word
    end 

    def self.least_commented
        # finds the event which has the least number of comments
    end

    def self.most_attended
        # returns the event with most number of attendes
    end

    def has_attendee(attendee_id)
        # returns true if the event has the mentioned attendee
    end
end

Models with many associations and otherwise have tendency to accumulate more and more code and become unmanageable.Concerns provide a way to skin-nize fat modules making them more modularized and easy to understand.

The above model can be refactored using concerns as below: Create a attendable.rd and commentable.rb file in app/model/concern/event folder

attendable.rb

module Attendable
    extend ActiveSupport::Concern

    included do 
        has_many :attenders
    end

    def has_attender(attender_id)
        # returns true if the event has the mentioned attendee
    end

    module ClassMethods
      def most_attended
        # returns the event with most number of attendes
      end
    end
end

commentable.rb

module Commentable
    extend ActiveSupport::Concern

    included do 
        has_many :comments
    end

    def find_first_comment
        # for the given article/event returns the first comment
    end

    def find_comments_with_word(word)
        # for the given event returns an array of comments which contain the given word
    end   

    module ClassMethods
      def least_commented
        # finds the event which has the least number of comments
      end
    end
end

And now using Concerns , your Event model reduces to

class Event < ActiveRecord::Base    
    include Commentable
    include Attendable
end

* While using concerns its advisable to go for 'domain' based grouping rather than 'technical' grouping. Domain Based grouping is like 'Commentable', 'Photoable', 'Attendable'. Technical grouping will mean 'ValidationMethods', 'FinderMethods' etc

    -
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3  
So Concerns are just a way to use inheritance or interfaces or multiple inheritance? What's wrong with creating a common base class and subclassing from that common base class? – Chloe Sep 6 '15 at 0:14
1  
Indeed @Chloe, I some where red, a Rails app with a 'concerns' directory is actually a 'concern'... – Ziyan Junaideen Nov 6 '15 at 17:02
    
You can use the 'included' block to define all your methods and includes: class methods (with def self.my_class_method), instance methods and method calls and directives in the class scope. No need for module ClassMethods – A Fader Darkly Nov 26 '15 at 15:28
    
The problem I have with concerns is that they add functionality directly to the model. So if two concerns both implement add_item, for example, you're screwed. I remember thinking Rails was broken when some validators stopped working, but someone had implemented any? in a concern. I propose a different solution: use the concern like an interface in a different language. Instead of defining the functionality, it defines the reference to a separate class instance that handles that functionality. Then you have smaller, neater classes that do one thing... – A Fader Darkly Nov 26 '15 at 15:33

This post helped me understand concerns.

# app/models/trader.rb
class Trader
  include Shared::Schedule
end

# app/models/concerns/shared/schedule.rb
module Shared::Schedule
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern
  ...
end
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Link is broken. – Itay Grudev Jun 4 '15 at 13:31
1  
Internet Archive version: web.archive.org/web/20130712014326/http://blog.andywaite.com/… – MZB Jun 4 '15 at 21:16

It's worth to mention that using concerns is considered bad idea by many.

  1. like this guy
  2. and this one

Some reasons:

  1. There is some dark magic happening behind the scenes - Concern is patching include method, there is a whole dependency handling system - way too much complexity for something that's trivial good old Ruby mixin pattern.
  2. Your classes are no less dry. If you stuff 50 public methods in various modules and include them, your class still has 50 public methods, it's just that you hide that code smell, sort of put your garbage in the drawers.
  3. Codebase is actually harder to navigate with old those concerns around.
  4. Are you sure all members of your team have same understanding what should really substitute concern?

Concerns are easy way to shoot yourself in a leg, be careful with them.

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I know SO is not the best place for this discussion, but what other type of Ruby mixin keeps your classes dry? It seems like reasons #1 and #2 in your arguments are counter, unless you're just making the case for better OO design, the services layer, or something else I'm missing? (I don't disagree -- I'm suggesting adding alternatives helps!) – toobulkeh Jul 22 '15 at 16:56
2  
Using github.com/AndyObtiva/super_module is one option, using good old ClassMethods patterns is another one. And using more objects(like services) to cleanly separate concerns is definitely the way to go. – Dr.Strangelove Aug 4 '15 at 13:26

I felt most of the examples here demonstrating the power of module rather than how ActiveSupport::Concern adds value to module.

Example 1: More readable modules.

So without concerns this how a typical module will be.

module M
  def self.included(base)
    base.extend ClassMethods
    base.class_eval do
      scope :disabled, -> { where(disabled: true) }
    end
  end

  def instance_method
    ...
  end

  module ClassMethods
    ...
  end
end

After refactoring with ActiveSupport::Concern.

require 'active_support/concern'

module M
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern

  included do
    scope :disabled, -> { where(disabled: true) }
  end

  class_methods do
    ...
  end

  def instance_method
    ...
  end
end

You see instance methods ,class methods and included block are less messy. Concerns will inject them appropriately for you. Thats one advantage of using ActiveSupport::Concern.


Example 2: Handle module dependencies gracefully.

module Foo
  def self.included(base)
    base.class_eval do
      def self.method_injected_by_foo_to_host_klass
        ...
      end
    end
  end
end

module Bar
  def self.included(base)
    base.method_injected_by_foo_to_host_klass
  end
end

class Host
  include Foo # We need to include this dependency for Bar
  include Bar # Bar is the module that Host really needs
end

In this example Bar is the module that Host really needs. But since Bar has dependency with Foo the Host class have to include Foo (but wait why Host want to know about Foo ? can it be avoided ?).

So Bar adds dependency everywhere it goes. And order of inclusion also matters here. This adds lot of complexity/dependency to huge code base.

After refactoring with ActiveSupport::Concern

require 'active_support/concern'

module Foo
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern
  included do
    def self.method_injected_by_foo_to_host_klass
      ...
    end
  end
end

module Bar
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern
  include Foo

  included do
    self.method_injected_by_foo_to_host_klass
  end
end

class Host
  include Bar # It works, now Bar takes care of its dependencies
end

Now it looks simple.

If you are thinking why cant we add Foo dependency in Bar module itself ? That wont work since method_injected_by_foo_to_host_klass have to be injected in class thats including Bar not on Bar module itself.

Source: Rails ActiveSupport::Concern

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In concerns make file filename.rb

For example I want in my application where attribute create_by exist update there value by 1, and 0 for updated_by

module TestConcern 
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern

  def checkattributes   
    if self.has_attribute?(:created_by)
      self.update_attributes(created_by: 1)
    end
    if self.has_attribute?(:updated_by)
      self.update_attributes(updated_by: 0)
    end
  end

end

after that include in your model like this:

class Role < ActiveRecord::Base
  include TestConcern
end
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