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I've found myself playing around with the turtle module in Python, and just tweaking some stuff to code written by someone else (Dmitri Kurilo). I did a pretty neat figure with it, forming beautiful curves. And because i know little about math, maybe some of you can help me decypher what's happening here! Thanks a lot, here's the code!:

import turtle, random
from math import *
def fib(n):    
    for n in range(400):
        turtle.color("black")
        turtle.right(pi*19)
        turtle.forward(n)
        if n > 400:
            break    

turtle.title("The Looping ball")
turtle.colormode(255)
turtle.color("white")
turtle.goto(0,0)
turtle.color("black")
turtle.speed(500)
fib(1)
turtle.getscreen()._root.mainloop()
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2 Answers 2

import turtle, random
from math import *

The import of random is superfluous. In the end, only turtle and math.pi are used.

def fib(n):    
    for n in range(400):
        turtle.color("black")
        turtle.right(pi*19)
        turtle.forward(n)
        if n > 400:
            break

Draw a figure constructed of 400 line segments, where every two segments have a 59.69 degree angle between them (the turtle module uses degrees by default), and every line segment is one unit longer than the previous one. This should almost result in a 6-angle spirangle, but because the angle between the segments is not one sixth of a full turn (60 degrees), it is slightly off.

Note that the parameter n is unused, because it is overwritten by the n in the loop. The condition n > 400 is never reached (because range(400) ranges from 0 inclusive to 400 exclusive), so the last part of the loop does nothing worth mentioning.

Now for the main part:

turtle.title("The Looping ball")
turtle.colormode(255)
turtle.color("white")
turtle.goto(0,0)
turtle.color("black")
turtle.speed(500)

Some settings for the resulting window are chosen: the title is set, the colormode is set (how you specify colour values; not used here), draw a white line to the center of the screen and leave the turtle there (it's better to use turtle.penup() and turtle.pendown() for this), and set the drawing speed as fast as possible (turtle.speed(0) would have done the same thing, and anything larger than ten is the same as turtle.speed(0)).

fib(1)

The spiral is drawn.

turtle.getscreen()._root.mainloop()

The control of the program is yielded to the main event loop of the turtle screen. If you don't do this, the window will close immediately after it has completed drawing. If you "run" the main loop, it will keep the program alive as long as the window is open.

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A clearer version of the original program:

import turtle

def fib(num, rot=59.7, scale=1.0):
    for n in range(num):
        turtle.right(rot)
        turtle.forward(n*scale)

turtle.title('The Looping ball')
turtle.speed(2000)
turtle.pencolor('blue')
fib(400, rot=92, scale=0.75)
turtle.getscreen()._root.mainloop()

This has some of the unnecessary stuff removed and some values parameterised so the OP can play with the number of lines, rotation before each line and the length of lines. This helps with getting a feel of how each parameter changes things.

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Thanks a bunch! –  Ivan Berdichevsky Jan 30 '13 at 15:22

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