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I'm designing a movie cataloger which will rely on a SQL database to store the data. I'm not a database design pro, and honestly I'm not so seasoned in anything but basic database queries. My question is what is the most efficient way to go about the following.

I currently have 5 tables created

Movies
------
[id] integer
[title] nvarchar(100)
[duration] integer
[year] datetime

People
------
[people_id] integer
[person] nvarchar(100)

Writers
-------
[id] integer
[people_id] integer

Directors
---------
[id] integer
[people_id] integer

Actors
------
[id] integer
[people_id] integer

Basically a many to many relationship using a junction table, Movies->Writers<-People, Movies->Directors<-People, and finally Movies->Actors<-People. The People table being the pool from which to draw the data needed for each role. Since a person could be both the director and star in a movie, a writer and director, or even all three roles, I believed that the 3 junction tables would solve that. Naturally a person can be in many movies as well. So I figured this was the way to do it.

I read up on setting up many to many relationships via several web articles, and the more I read, the more I get confused on exactly how to setup this situation. Most just tackle a single field or use an author/book analogy, which doesn't help me understand how to implement my situation.

As stated earlier, my question being, is this an efficient way to do this? Or even proper?

I want to be able to easily query a movie, and get all information related to it out to a form.

Thanks -Res

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This is the correct design, especially if you later add fields or constraints that differ between Writers, Directors and Actors. OTOH, if you leave 3 junction tables with the same fields/constraints, you could just as well merge them to a single table, similarly to what some of the answers already proposed. – Branko Dimitrijevic Jan 27 '13 at 0:00

Don't make separate tables, create a new table like PeopleRoles that contains 'Actor', 'Director' etc., then a relation table to join movies, people and roles at once:

Movies
------
[id] integer
[title] nvarchar(100)
[duration] integer
[year] datetime

People
------
[people_id] integer
[person] nvarchar(100)

PeopleRoles
-----------
[role_id] integer
[name] nvarchar(100)

MovieCollaborators
------------------
[id] integer
[people_id] integer
[movie_id] integer
[role_id] integer

You will gain flexibility and the ability to easily get all collaborators from a movie with a single JOIN.

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You are simulating inheritance, but your derived types don't have any different fields, therefore, you might as well put them all in one table and have a descriminator column to indicate their types.

The other complex part of this modeling problem is that you could have the same person perform many roles, e.g. Write, Direct, Star. I think you need to introduce the notion of a Role. Then that links to the Roles not to the person. Role classes are a common feature in many-to-many models.

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Instead of the three many to many tables that you have proposed, better have one table movie-people which will have three columns: MovieId, peopleId, roleType

You will know the role of the person by the roleType(actor, director, writer)

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I would recommend combining writers, directors, and actors into one table.

enter image description here

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If things remain as simple as they are, you should use the model suggested in other answers of a single join table that contains a "Role" column.

However, you might want to start adding things to your model that only apply to certain roles. For example, is the Actor the lead, supporting, or cameo? In this case, the model you have described in your question is better. The downside of your model is that if you want to treat involvement in a movie in a generic fashion you will need to UNION together lots of tables.

It is a tradeoff. A single join table with a role column makes it easier to treat the role generically. Using a separate join table for each role makes it easier to treat them differently.

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