Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have some complicated C++ code but the problem narrows down to doing a push_back on a list of structures:

list<cache_page> cachedPages;

void f()
{
    cache_page cpage(a,b);
    cachedPages.push_back(cpage);
}

I have commented all the data members of the struct cache_page and still the error persists. If I comment the push_back line, there is no error.

What could be the reason?

I have tried using GDB and the error occurs in _List_Node_base::hook() function.

template < class T >
class A
{
    T x;
    public:
        void func()
        {
          x->f();
        }

};

class B : public A < B* >
{
    list<cache_page> cachedPages;
    public:
        void f()
        {
            cache_page cpage;
            cachedPages.push_back(cpage);
        }
};

I have a do nothing copy constructor. I have no data members in cache_page.

share|improve this question
    
What exact type does your list have? (list<cache_page> or list<cache_page *> or any smart pointer class?) – Rüdiger Stevens Sep 21 '09 at 12:28
    
list<cache_page> cachedPages; – Rohit Banga Sep 21 '09 at 12:30
    
Where is the list declared, where instantiated? Many reasons could be possible. – StampedeXV Sep 21 '09 at 12:30
1  
For testing purpose, you can add one more member variable in class B and try to access that instead of list in f(). If it still crashes then x->f() in class A is trying to operate on invalid x. – aJ. Sep 21 '09 at 12:58
2  
Post the cache_page code. If you get an error in a list<cache_page>, it is pretty safe to assume that the problem is in cache_page rather than list. – jalf Sep 22 '09 at 13:03
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're crossing the streams. Haven't you seen Ghostbusters? Don't cross the streams.

You're crossing the streams here:

class B : public A < B *>

I don't understand the point of this. What are you trying to do? CRTP? This is not the way it's done.

The problem is not in the push back, the problem is, "this" being invalid.

When you have

  void f()
  {
    cache_page cpage;
  }

It's compiled to a NOP. this is not acceded everything is fine.

  void f()
  {
    cache_page cpage;
    // oops this access
    this->cachedPages.push_back(cpage);
  }

Except it's called in the context of A. What is the value of this ? It's not initialized anywhere. So this is equal to whatever is in memory, where a happy uninitialized list is waiting.

The fix?

template < class T >
class A
{
  T * _x;
public:
 explicit A(T * x) : _x(x) {}

 void func()
 {
   _x->f();
 }

};


class B : public A < B >
{
  list<cache_page> cachedPages;
public:
  B(void) : A<B>(this) {}

  void f()
  {
    cache_page cpage;
    cachedPages.push_back(cpage);
  }
};

This should work better. But what about...

template < class T >
class A
{
public:
 void func()
 {
   static_cast<T>(this)->f();
 }

};


class B : public A<B>
{
  list<cache_page> cachedPages;
public:
  void f()
  {
    cache_page cpage;
    cachedPages.push_back(cpage);
  }

};

That's the way CRTP is done.

share|improve this answer
    
shouldn't the static_cast be (static_cast<T*>(this))->f(); Moreover is it valid to use static_cast to cast a base class pointer to a derived class pointer. Shouldn't a dynamic cast be used. Of course the class A is not aware that the type T is a derived class. I am confused. – Rohit Banga Jul 31 '10 at 13:07
    
I checked the program, the static_cast should be done to T*. And I didn't realize that we cannot do dynamic cast since there is no polymorphism. I need to brush up the basics. – Rohit Banga Jul 31 '10 at 13:28

If I recall correctly, some if not all STL containers require a copy constructor and assignment operator. If you've relied on the default of those two, or are doing a shallow copy when you should be doing a deep copy, that could be the cause of your segfault.

share|improve this answer

I guess list does a copy of the cpage object, have you checked that the copy constructor if cpage doesn't segfault on that situation?

share|improve this answer
    
i have a do nothing copy constructor. it is called when i do push_back. but i do not have any data member in cache_page struct. – Rohit Banga Sep 21 '09 at 12:56

Sounds like cachedPages doesn't really exist. Could it already have been deleted?

Alternatively, is f() a member function? Are you sure that its (this) object still exists? I've been puzzled by many weird looking problems inside member functions, only to print *this in gdb and realise that I've de-referenced a bad pointer in the next stack frame up.

share|improve this answer
    
yes f() is a member function. see the code snippet above. and i have a single threaded program and i can do other things in f() without a segmentation fault. that suggests *this is not null. – Rohit Banga Sep 21 '09 at 13:00

You may be double deleting. Does the destructor of cpage do some cleanup? If that is the case, and cpage does not have a copy constructor which increases a refcount or makes a deep copy, then the cleanup will occur twice.

share|improve this answer
    
no data members in cache_page. – Rohit Banga Sep 21 '09 at 14:58

You need to specify the assignment (=) operator so that sort routines can assign a new order to the members of the list. After that I think you'd be fine.

share|improve this answer
    
does not help. i tried. my struct has no data members. – Rohit Banga Sep 21 '09 at 13:11
    
OK, I tried following the code you've posted...it compiles fine and there are no errors while calling f(). Please post a code snippet that can reproduce the error reliably. – Michael Foukarakis Sep 21 '09 at 13:29

Found the bug: Its a really subtle one. In the code, x is a pointer and it is not being initialized in the base class. Calling x->f() accesses the vtable to invoke the correct function in the derived class B. But, since the pointer value is uninitialized, the "this" parameter is wrong. Trying to access the list is then an invalid operation and the code crashed.

To correct this error, pass an argument of the com in the constrof type T, which will be initialized to this by the constructor of the derived class.

class A
{
public:
A(T p): x(p)
{
}

};

class B
{
public:
B() : A(this)
{
}
};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.