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In a minecraft-like game I'm making, I'm getting these weird lines on polygon edges:

I'm using a texture atlas, being clamped with GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE.

I tried using setting GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER to GL_LINEAR, GL_NEAREST and even using mipmaps, but it doesn't make a difference. I also tried insetting the texture coordinates by half a pixel, or using x16 anisotropic filtering, with no sucess.

Any help?

Edit - The top face of the cubes is being rendered something like this:

            glBegin(GL_QUADS);

            glTexCoord2f(0f, 0f);
            glVertex3f(x, y + 1f, z);

            glTexCoord2f(0f, 1 / 8f);
            glVertex3f(x, y + 1f, z + 1f);

            glTexCoord2f(1 / 8f, 1 / 8f);
            glVertex3f(x + 1f, y + 1f, z + 1f);

            glTexCoord2f(1 / 8f, 0f);
            glVertex3f(x + 1f, y + 1f, z);

            glEnd();
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It looks like it's down to the actual polygons interfering. How are you defining the cubes? How are you placing the cubes next to each other? – ChrisF Jan 26 '13 at 23:42
    
Edited the question – Luis Cruz Jan 26 '13 at 23:46
    
If the polygons of the cubes "overlap" you might see an effect like this where it can't decide which one to draw first so draws them both. – ChrisF Jan 26 '13 at 23:49
    
Thanks for your help, but that isn't happening. :( Any other tips? – Luis Cruz Jan 26 '13 at 23:51
    
They only have to overlap by a couple of pixels. But no I have no other tips. – ChrisF Jan 26 '13 at 23:54
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This looks like the classical texture pixel <-> screen pixel fenceposting problem to me. See my answer to it here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/5879551/524368

Another issue might be, that the corner coordinates of the cubes are not exactly the same. Floating point numbers have some intrinsic error and if you arrange those cubes in a grid by adding some floating point number to it, it may happen, that the vertex positions get slightly off and due to roundoff error you get to see depth fighting. Two things to solve this: 1st: If two cubes' faces touch, don't render them. 2nd: Use integer coordinates for laying out the cube grid and convert the vertices to floating point only when submitting to OpenGL, or don't convert at all.

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