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Hi folks and thanks for reading

I have a quiz feature on my site which stores a score, username and ip address as the most important columns. I currently have a horrible series of views bringing back the high scores based on the criteria I need which are...

Lowest score first but...only the lowest score for each Quiz user.

The complexity lies if the user has changed ip, i.e. keeps the same username but has a different ip OR if the user keeps the same IP address but changes user name.

It's easier to explain with an example.

  • First visitor has 4 entries but from 3 different IP Addresses
  • Second user from 2 IP Addresses
  • Third user using one IP Address but using 3 Usernames

Table with VALUES(UserID, IPA, Score)

  • User 1, IP1, 13
  • User 1, IP1, 20
  • User 1, IP2, 30
  • User 1, IP3, 10
  • User 2, IP4, 20
  • User 2, IP5, 22
  • User 2, IP5, 15
  • User 3, IP6, 12
  • User 3, IP6, 20
  • User 4, IP6, 15
  • User 5, IP6, 11

The highscore query would present you with

  1. User 1, IP3, 10
  2. User 5, IP6, 11
  3. User 2, IP5, 15

The score value is highly unlikely to be duplicated but I guess it is possible. The figures above are simplified to explain my conundrum!

Can anyone suggest an efficient way of removing these duplicates as my table is now over 15,000 records and the views are creaking!

Many thanks.

share|improve this question
    
So presumably there's a date visited somewhere, given you aren't choosing the record to keep based on it being the biggest IP address. If you search on this site you'll find this question loads of times, and quite often a comment. What have you tried? –  Tony Hopkinson Jan 26 '13 at 23:52
    
Yes I do keep a DateTime record for each quiz attempt. For each visitor I have a series of views which allows them to view their own best scores in a separate highscore table, as well as the best scores overall. –  Ceeege Jan 26 '13 at 23:56
1  
A table schema would have helped you get a better answer quicker. –  Tony Hopkinson Jan 27 '13 at 0:55
1  
There's something seriously wrong with your data model. IP address isn't an 'important column' at all, it is actually just noise in the terms of this question. –  EJP Jan 27 '13 at 1:53
    
I don't understand the example. What do you want to keep. And what do you want to delete? –  Strawberry Jan 27 '13 at 19:16

1 Answer 1

To identify occurrences of duplicate (UserID,IPA) tuples is pretty straightforward:

SELECT s.UserID
     , s.IPA
  FROM mytable s
 GROUP
    BY s.UserID
     , s.IPA
HAVING COUNT(1) > 1

To get the lowest score, you could add MIN(s.Score) to the select list.

Deleting duplicates is a little more difficult, in that you don't seem to have any guarantee of uniqueness. Some will recommend that you copy the rows you want to keep out to a separate table, and then either swap the tables with renames, or truncate the original table and reload from the new table. (That usually turns out to be the most efficient approach.)

CREATE TABLE newtable LIKE mytable ;

INSERT INTO newtable (UserID,IPA,Score)
SELECT s.UserID
     , s.IPA
     , MIN(Score) AS Score
  FROM mytable s
 GROUP
    BY s.UserID
     , s.IPA ;

If you want to identify duplicates by just UserID, the same approach can work. If it isn't important that the IPA value comes from the row with the lowest score, it's a little easier. I can put together the query that gets the row that has the lowest score for the user.


If you want to delete rows from the existing table, without adding a unique identifier (like an AUTO_INCREMENT id column) on each row, that can be done too.

This will get you partway, deleting all rows for a given (UserID,IPA) that have a score higher than the lowest score:

DELETE t.*
  FROM mytable t
  JOIN ( SELECT s.UserID
              , s.IPA
              , MIN(s.Score)
           FROM mytable s
          GROUP
             BY s.Userid
              , s.IPA
       ) k
    ON k.UserID = t.UserID
   AND k.IPA = t.IPA
   AND k.Score < t.Score

But that will still leave duplicate occurrences of duplicate (UserID,IPA,Score) tuples. Without some other column on the table that makes the row unique, it's a little more difficult to remove duplicates. (Again, a common technique is copy the rows you want to keep to another table, and either swap tables or reload the original table from the saved rows.


FOLLOWUP

Note that views (both stored and inline) can be expensive performancewise, with MySQL, since the views get materialized as temporary MyISAM tables (MySQL calls them "derived tables").

But correlated subqueries can be even more problematic on large sets.

So, choose your poison.

If there the table has an index ON (userID, Score, IPA) here's how I would get the resultset:

SELECT IF(@prev_user=t.UserID,@i:=@i+1,@i:=1) AS seq
     , @prev_user := t.UserID AS UserID
     , t.IPA
     , t.Score
  FROM mytable t
  JOIN (SELECT @i := NULL, @prev_user := NULL) i
 GROUP
    BY t.UserID ASC
     , t.Score ASC
     , t.IPA ASC
HAVING seq = 1

This is taking advantage of some MySQL-specific features: user_variables and the guarantee that the GROUP BY will return a sorted resultset. (The EXPLAIN output will show "Using index", which means we avoid a sort operation, but the query will still create a derived table. We use the user_variables to identify the "first" row for each UserID, and the HAVING clause eliminates all but that first row.


test case:

create table mytable (UserID VARCHAR(6), IPA varchar(3), Score INT);
create index mytable_IX ON mytable (UserID, Score, IPA);
insert into mytable values ('User 1','IP1',13)
,('User 1','IP1',20)
,('User 1','IP2',30)
,('User 1','IP3',10)
,('User 2','IP4',20)
,('User 2','IP5',22)
,('User 2','IP5',15)
,('User 3','IP6',12)
,('User 3','IP6',20)
,('User 4','IP6',15)
,('User 5','IP6',11);

Another followup

To eliminate 'User 4' and 'User 5' from the resultset (it's not at all clear why you would want or need to do that. If it's because those users have only one row in the table, then you could add a JOIN to a subquery (inline view) that gets a list of UserID values where there is more than one row, like this:

SELECT IF(@prev_user=t.UserID,@i:=@i+1,@i:=1) AS seq
     , @prev_user := t.UserID AS UserID
     , t.IPA
     , t.Score
  FROM mytable t
  JOIN ( SELECT d.UserID
           FROM mytable d
          GROUP
             BY d.UserID
         HAVING COUNT(1) > 1
       ) m
    ON m.UserID = t.UserID
 CROSS
  JOIN (SELECT @i := NULL, @prev_user := NULL) i
 GROUP
    BY t.UserID ASC
     , t.Score ASC
     , t.IPA ASC
HAVING seq = 1
share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks for the detailed reply - much appreciated. I'd vote this up but I've only recently joined the site. Is it possible to do this as a View as records will be contiually added to the Quiz table and running either a query or referring to a View would be really handy? –  Ceeege Jan 27 '13 at 0:09
    
I'm getting the following when running the above query on the 11 rows. I'd expected / hoped for 3! seq UserID IP Score 1 User1 IP1 20 1 User2 IP4 20 1 User3 IP6 12 1 User4 IP6 15 1 User5 IP6 11 I was hoping to see... seq UserID IP Score 1 User1 IP3 20 1 User2 IP4 20 1 User3 IP6 12 Any ideas? (Must go to bed now - 1:15am and two kids due up in 5 hours) Thanks again! –  Ceeege Jan 27 '13 at 1:15
    
@Ceeege: It's not clear why you wouldn't want the rows from 'User 4' and 'User 5' returned. Is it because there is only one row in the table for those users? And if we added another row for 'User 4', then a row should appear in the resultset? To get a resultset that includes a user only if there are at least two rows in the table, that can be done, by adding a join to a subquery (inline view). I will add another query to my answer. –  spencer7593 Jan 27 '13 at 19:05
    
I want to eliminate the 'User 4' and 'User 5' records as they are from the same IP address as User 3. What I'm trying to get is the best score from a single physical person (but that person's computer may not be on a fixed IP Address or they could change their Username). The query as it is now is very close, it's returning the correct number of users/records but still needs to get the lowest score. I've had a fiddle trying unsuccessfully to introduce a MIN Score clause into Query but failing as my SQL is nowhere near your level. Again, massive thanks for sticking with me on this. –  Ceeege Jan 27 '13 at 20:56

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