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I have a string that contains null characters.

I've tried to save it to a file with this code:

myStringList.Text := myString;
myStringList.SaveToFile('c:\myfile');

Unfortunately myStringList.Text is empty if the source string has a null character at the beginning.

I thought only C string were terminated by a null character, and Delphi was always fine with it.

How to save the content of the string to a file?

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3  
Not sure what you are asking. You are asking why saving an empty string results in an empty file? –  Nick Hodges Jan 27 '13 at 1:13
    
You mean, you have a string with one of the byte having the 0 value? –  TheVedge Jan 27 '13 at 1:20
4  
I think you mean "a string that contains #0 characters", don't you? It's really not a "string with zero bytes", it's a "string that contains #0 characters", which has a totally separate meaning. –  Ken White Jan 27 '13 at 1:20
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think you mean "save a string that has #0 characters in it".

If that's the case, don't try and put it in a TStringList. In fact, don't try to save it as a string at all; just like in C, a NULL character (#0 in Delphi) causes the string to be truncated at times. Use a TFileStream and write it directly as byte content:

var
  FS: TFileStream;
begin
  FS := TFileStream.Create('C:\MyFile', fmCreate);
  try
    FS.Write(myString[1], Length(myString) * SizeOf(Char));
  finally
    FS.Free;
  end;
end;

To read it back:

var
  FS: TFileStream;
begin
  FS := TFileStream.Create('C:\MyFile', fmOpenRead);
  try
    SetLength(MyString, FS.Size);
    FS.Read(MyString[1], FS.Size);
  finally
    FS.Free;
  end;
end;
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2  
I just tested, a TStringList containing the text #0#0'Something'#0 was successfully saved to a TXT file (the resulting file has 14 bytes). None the less your answer is the "best practice", one shouldn't work with string if it's not actually string, so +1; The OP might be on delphi-7 right now, but any code that treats string as anything but string will fail when converted to Unicode. –  Cosmin Prund Jan 27 '13 at 7:00
    
@Cosmin: Thanks. :-) I thought about adding the info about string not being the proper type (and suggesting a switch to at least a byte array instead), but decided that was beyond the scope of the question asked. –  Ken White Jan 27 '13 at 7:04
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When you set the Text property of a TStrings object, the new value is parsed as a null-terminated string. Therefore when the code reaches your null character, the parsing stops.

I'm not sure why the Delphi RTL code was designed that way, and its not documented, but that's just how setting the Text property works.

You can avoid this by using the Add method rather than the Text property.

myStringList.Clear;
myStringList.Add(myString);
myStringList.SaveToFile(FileName);
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About writing strings to a file in general.. I still see people creating streams or stringlists just to write some stuff to a file, and then destroy the stream or stringlist.

Delphi7 didn't have IOUtuls.pas yet, but you're missing out on that.

There's a handy TFile record with class methods that lets you write text to a file with a single line, without requiring temporary variables:

TFile.WriteAllText('out.txt','hi');

Upgrading makes your life as a Delphi developer a lot easier. This is just a tiny example.

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