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Take the following two tables in Oracle:

Create Table A
( A int, B int, C int,
  Constraint pk_ab Primary Key(A, B),
  Unique (C)
);

Create Table B
( D int, E int, F int,
  Constraint fk_d Foreign Key (D) References A(A),
  Constraint fk_e Foreign Key (E) References A(B)
);

Why doesn't this statement work? Or more specifically, why shouldn't it work? The reason I'm trying to create this type of relation is say, in the future, I want to delete B.D, but keep the relation FK_E.

I'm getting the error:

ORA-02270: no matching unique or primary key for this column-list

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Do you get an error? I can't remember if Oracle enforces this, but if A.A and A.B are referenced as FKs, they may each need an individual index, rather than just the composite PK you have defined on them. Try defining an additional index on each of those columns alone in Table A. –  Michael Berkowski Jan 27 '13 at 2:32
    
So the total indices you have on Table A are: PK (A,B), UNIQUE (C), INDEX (A), INDEX (B) –  Michael Berkowski Jan 27 '13 at 2:33
    
Hm, it's yelling at me: ORA-00904: : invalid identifier Oh, sorry, I didn't notice your first question, yes, I get an error. ORA-02270: no matching unique or primary key for this column-list –  Psidhu Jan 27 '13 at 2:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

"Why doesn't this statement work? Or more specifically, why shouldn't it work? "

You have defined the primary key on A as a compound of two columns (A,B). Any foreign key which references PK_AB must match those columns in number. This is because a foreign key must identify a single row in the referenced table which owns any given row in the child table. The compound primary key means column A.A can contain duplicate values and so can column A.B; only the permutations of (A,B) are unique. Consequently the referencing foreign key needs two columns.

Create Table B
( D int, E int, F int,
  Constraint fk_de Foreign Key (D,E) References A(A,B)
);

"Since there are multiple PK's that table B references"

Wrong. B references a single primary key, which happens to comprise more than one column,

" say, in the future, I want to delete B.D, but keep the relation fk_e. "

That doesn't make sense. Think of it this way: D is not a property of B, it is an attribute B inherits through its dependence on table A.

One way to avoid this situation is to use a surrogate (or synthetic) key. Compound keys are often business keys, hence their columns are meaningful in a business context. One feature of meaningful column values is that they can change, and cascading such changes to foreign keys can be messy.

Implementing a surrogate key would look like this:

Create Table A
( id int not null, A int, B int, C int,
  Constraint pk_a Primary Key(ID),
  constraint uk_ab Unique (A,B)
);

Create Table B
( a_id int, F int,
  Constraint fk_n_a Foreign Key (A_ID) References A(ID)
);

Of course, you could kind of do this using the schema you posted, as you already have a single column constraint on A(C). However, I think it is bad practice to reference unique constraints rather than primary keys, even though it's allowed. I think this partly because unique constraints often enforce a business key, hence meaning, hence the potential for change, but mainly because referencing primary keys just is the industry standard.

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1  
That was exactly the answer I was looking for. Explained everything in full, thank you! I never made the connection that a FK must identify an entire single row in the referenced table. It also helped clear up what a PK actually is (It's not multiple keys, it is multiple attributes that make up a single key). Again, thank you a bunch. –  Psidhu Jan 27 '13 at 7:36

Try create two separate indexes for column's A and B before creating table B

CREATE INDEX a_idx ON A (A);
CREATE INDEX b_idx ON A (B);

But probably you need a compound FK on table B

Create Table B
( D int, E int, F int,
  Constraint fk_d Foreign Key (D,E) References A(A,B)
);
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Doing the compound works, as it should. But then the problem of wanting to delete B.D later by: Alter Table B Drop (D); results in error. –  Psidhu Jan 27 '13 at 3:19
    
I can't imagine why would you need to do this. Creating separate indexes as I said will allow you to have separate FKs. But probably you need completely different schema design. And to help you with that we need to know your real requirements not in terms of As and Bs. –  peterm Jan 27 '13 at 3:27
    
Haha, my question doesn't stem from need, but rather clarification on the 'why' Say you just don't need an attribute anymore, but it is a foreign key, how would you go about getting rid of it? That's my current goal. –  Psidhu Jan 27 '13 at 3:31
1  
If that's the only goal create separate indexes. You have your answer already. –  peterm Jan 27 '13 at 3:33
    
@peterm ya i guess u r rite on the money there peter.. learnt something today. –  user1974729 Jan 27 '13 at 3:39

A foreign key always references a PK of another table. Neither A nor B alone are PK's.. You have multiple PK's.

Constraint fk_d Foreign Key (D,E) References A(A,B)

Also the database cannot validate a partial null multiple foreign key, so I think the check constraint also needs to be added to the table.

alter table B add constraint check_nullness
    check ( ( D is not null and E is not null ) or
                ( D is null and E is null ) )
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Okay, I guess I'll pose another question here. Since there are multiple PK's that table B references, how do you delete a foreign key in table B if you compound reference it? –  Psidhu Jan 27 '13 at 3:23
    
i realise that it does not answer ur question because u r adamant on having 2 foreign keys and u probably already know the multiple PK thing and u r trying to squeeze in entities that are truly only dependent on table A.A into the system.. i wud say table A PK A, table B PK B, table C PK (C,D) FK (C,D) -> PK (A,B) ... now table D FK D -> PK A... table E FK E -> PK B and a table F FK (D,E) -> PK (A,B) –  user1974729 Jan 27 '13 at 3:26

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