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I'm new to PHP but I think it's possible, thought unsure how to achieve this.

I've got a basic HTML markup inside a PHP file called button.php which I'm injecting into a web page using PHP include.

Here's the contents of the button.php file:

<div class="btn">
<div class="highlightBtn">
    <div class="btnTag">
        Submit
    </div>
</div>
</div>

The question is - how do I the value inside the class="btnTag" tags AFTER I've included it? (I.e. after I include this file into the main page I want to be able to change it depending on where it's included, so it doesn't always have to say 'Submit').

So I imagine it might be something like

<? php include("button.php"); 
   //some code follows to change value inside the btnTag class  
?>

Thanks for your help!

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You could do it before, but after would be a huge hassle, and include one of several extremely ugly and pointless solutions. –  nickb Jan 27 '13 at 2:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It really should be done beforehand, as in

// button.php
<div class="btn">
<div class="highlightBtn">
    <div class="btnTag">
        <?php echo isset($caption) ? $caption : 'Submit' ; ?>
    </div>
</div>
</div>

And then

<?php
    $caption = 'Click me'; // or comment out to get the default
    include('button.php');
?>

However, the above is not really a good approach

It would be much better to have the file just define a function when included, which you can then call whenever you need a button. For example:

// button.php
<?php
    function button($caption = 'Submit') {
        echo <<<END_HTML;
<div class="btn">
  <div class="highlightBtn">
    <div class="btnTag">$caption</div>
  </div>
</div>
END_HTML;
    }

You can then include button.php without any immediate effects, and whenever you want a button you can just call button('Click me') or just button().

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Thank you that is exactly what I need. Just out of curiosity - what makes the second solution more reliable or versatile than the first? The first solution seems to use less markup. –  user1775598 Jan 27 '13 at 3:09
    
@user1775598: In general it's much better for your files to not do anything directly when included; it makes it easier to compose complex interactions among simpler basic parts. –  Jon Jan 27 '13 at 3:11

You should do it before including it:

$string = 'Submit';
include 'button.php';

and inside button.php:

<div class="btn">
<div class="highlightBtn">
    <div class="btnTag">
        <?php echo $string; ?>
    </div>
</div>
</div>

If you want to change it after the page load then you should look at AJAX. Other solutions (for dealing with it after inclusion) would require output buffer handling, DOM handling and other painful routines that are not really an option.

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