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As I understand you only need one instance of MongoClient per applications so I've extended HttpServlet with this method for convenience:

DB getDB(String dbName) throws Exception {
    MongoClient m = (MongoClient)getServletContext().getAttribute("mongo");
    if(m == null) {
        m = new MongoClient();
        getServletContext().setAttribute("mongo",m);
    }
    return m.getDB(dbName);
}

When I run this code it works just fine and I connect and do what work I need to, but it seems to continually open new connections to mongodb everytime I run this particular Servlet:

Sat Jan 26 21:31:42 [initandlisten] connection accepted from 127.0.0.1:46860 #1 (1 connection now open)
Sat Jan 26 21:31:53 [initandlisten] connection accepted from 127.0.0.1:46861 #2 (2 connections now open)
Sat Jan 26 21:32:00 [initandlisten] connection accepted from 127.0.0.1:46863 #3 (3 connections now open)

In the page I am doing this:

DB db = getDB("foo");
col = db.getCollection("bar");

and then running a simple query. Can anyone explain why I'm getting so many new connections? Also I've seen this Mongo.Holder class. Is this the preferred way to do what I am doing?

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

MongoDB Java driver implements a connection pool, and by default maintains 10 connections. The pool is managed internally by the driver. You should not see more than 10 connections going out to Mongo server from your servlet container. If you wish to change these default settings, check out MongoOptions.

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I've been doing the development on my laptop and I shut it down while I waited for a response. I started it back up to do some more work today and I am not seeing the same behavior at all. Now it's only making one connection which is what I would expect. Perhaps I have a bug somewhere or something strange with redeploys from my IDE. I will accept your answer because now I can't seem to reproduce. Thanks for your time! –  Tim Jan 28 '13 at 2:59
    
Oh and one more thing: when I was seeing this there was something like 37 connections. –  Tim Jan 28 '13 at 3:01
    
Here we go; if I bang submit enough it goes past 10: Sun Jan 27 22:12:06 [initandlisten] connection accepted from 127.0.0.1:56225 #9 (9 connections now open) Sun Jan 27 22:12:07 [initandlisten] connection accepted from 127.0.0.1:56226 #10 (10 connections now open) Sun Jan 27 22:12:20 [initandlisten] connection accepted from 127.0.0.1:56228 #11 (11 connections now open) Sun Jan 27 22:12:31 [initandlisten] connection accepted from 127.0.0.1:56230 #12 (12 connections now open) –  Tim Jan 28 '13 at 3:13
    
I used MongoClientOptions and set the max connections to 5 and it looks like it stops at 5. I supposed they increased the maximum number of connections from 10 to something else. Nothing else was connected to it except for the mongo binary which wasn't doing anything. Thanks again! –  Tim Jan 28 '13 at 3:25
    
Glad it worked for you! –  lobster1234 Jan 28 '13 at 6:19

The default maximum size of the connection pool increased from 10 to 100 in MongoClientOptions, which is mentioned in the detailed Javadoc: http://api.mongodb.org/java/current/com/mongodb/MongoClientOptions.html#getConnectionsPerHost().

If you are using MongoOptions, the default is still 10.

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