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Hello fellow programmers, I have taken up learning JavaScript. This syntax is pure sorcery, can someone clarify:

function CleanPet(){
    alert("The pet is now clean!");
}

CleanPet.Description="Dirty Business";

The material I am reading explains that in JavaScript, functions are like any other object, but if I attach a property to a function, does this mean it is static, since I haven't actually declared it?

Thanks for help, I.N.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Object properties aren't "declared" in the formal sense of using var like you do for variables. Given an existing object CleanPet, you can assign properties like CleanPet.Description (as in the question) which will create the Description property if it doesn't already exist, or overwrite the property if it did already exist.

It is also "legal" to attempt to access object properties that you haven't set yet, e.g., CleanPet.SomeOtherProperty - the resulting value will be undefined. (Not an error, though that assumes CleanPet actually is an object. If CleanPet is null or undefined then CleanPet.SomeOtherProperty would give an error.)

So regarding functions specifically, a function declaration:

 function CleanPet { /* some code */ }

...declares a single object that happens to be a function. Which means you can call it as a function CleanPet(), but it still gets "ordinary" object behaviour such as the ability to have properties assigned.

JavaScript functions are also object constructors if called with new:

var cleanPet1 = new CleanPet();

In that case JS creates a new object (instance) every time you call new CleanPet(), but the CleanPet.Description property is not accessible via cleanPet1.Description because it is a property of the constructor, not a property of the resulting new instance. So in that sense, yes, the property is "static".

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Functions in javascript are objects and can have properties.

When you assign a property to a function like in your example, it creates a new property on that function object and it behaves essentially like a variable at the same scope as the function itself, but the property is scoped only to the function name so it doesn't pollute the global name space.

There are several reasons one might do this:

  1. You want a global variable that maintains its value from one invocation of the function to another.
  2. You don't want to pollute the global namespace for this new variable.
  3. You like the idea of encapsulating global variables associated with the function that they pertain to.
  4. You want to optimize the code so that static or constant declarations are not re-evaluated every time you run the function.

In your example, you're seeing the benefits of all four.

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Yes, The property of a function/class is static

MyClass.Description = "Dirty Business";

MyClass.staticFn = function() {

};

MyClass = function() {
  this.var = "test";
};

MyClass.prototype.instanceFn = function() {

};


// To call an instance function
obj = new MyClass();
obj.instanceFn();

// To call a static function
MyClass.staticFunction();

// Or to access a static property
alert(MyClass.Description)
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Note that your instanceFn is not really an instance function in the sense that there is only one copy of it on the prototype, not a separate copy with every instance created via new MyClass(). You can of course call it from the instances. –  nnnnnn Jan 27 '13 at 5:04

Comparing JavaScript with C++

JavaScript is a prototypal object oriented language like Self. However the syntax of JavaScript is borrowed from C/C++. This is what confuses most programmers who come from a classical object oriented background.

1. Public and Private Properties

Consider the following C++ program:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Rectangle {
    int height;
    int width;

    public:

    Rectangle(int height, int width) {
        this.height = height;
        this.width = width;
    }

    int area() {
        return height * width;
    }
}

int main() {
    Rectangle rectangle(3, 7);
    cout << rectangle.area() << endl;
    return 0;
}

This would translate one-to-one to JavaScript as follows:

main();

function Rectangle(height, width) {
    this.area = function () {
        return height * width;
    };
}

function main() {
    var rectangle = new Rectangle(3, 7);
    console.log(rectangle.area());
    return 0;
}

There are a few things to notice here:

  1. The function main was called before it was declared. This is possible because declarations are hoisted. No need for forward declarations.
  2. The Square "class" (ahem, "constructor function") is simple and small.
  3. Public properties (or functions) are added to the object pointed to by this.
  4. Everything else is private (only accessible via closures).

2. Shared Public Properties

In C++ only inline functions are defined inside the class body. Every other function must be defined outside. Generally however all functions (including inline functions) are defined outside:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Rectangle {
    public:

    int height;
    int width;

    Rectangle(int height, int width);
    int area();
}

Rectangle::Rectangle(int height, int width) {
    this.height = height;
    this.width = width;
}

int Rectangle::area() {
    return this.height * this.width;
}

int main() {
    Rectangle rectangle(3, 7);
    cout << rectangle.area() << endl;
    return 0;
}

In JavaScript you would add shared methods (never create shared properties) to the prototype of the constructor function. This is similar to the above C++ program. The advantage of doing so is that JavaScript does not create new methods for each instance of the constructor function:

main();

function Rectangle(height, width) {
    this.height = height;
    this.width = width;
}

Rectangle.prototype.area = function () {
    return this.height * this.width;
};

function main() {
    var rectangle = new Rectangle(3, 7);
    console.log(rectangle.area());
    return 0;
}

The JavaSctipt version is actually smaller because we don't have need to declare the properties and methods inside a class.

3. Public Static Properties

C++ allows you to declare static properties and methods on classes. This is like using the class as an object. You may also use a function as an object. Those are called functors:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Rectangle {
    public:

    int height;
    int width;

    static Rectangle fromSquare(int side);
    Rectangle(int height, int width);
    int area();
}

static Rectangle Rectangle::fromSquare(int side) {
    return new Rectangle(side, side);
}

Rectangle::Rectangle(int height, int width) {
    this.height = height;
    this.width = width;
}

int Rectangle::area() {
    return this.height * this.width;
}

int main() {
    Rectangle square = Rectangle.fromSquare(5);
    cout << square.area() << endl;
    return 0;
}

Since functions are objects in JavaScript you can simply add properties to it (like a functor). If these functions are used as constructors, the properties on the function are called static properties:

main();

Rectangle.fromSquare = function (side) {
    return new Rectangle(side, side);
};

function Rectangle(height, width) {
    this.height = height;
    this.width = width;
}

Rectangle.prototype.area = function () {
    return this.height * this.width;
};

function main() {
    var square = Rectangle.fromSquare(5);
    console.log(square.area());
    return 0;
}

That's it. See the size difference between the same code in JavaScript and in C++? You decide which syntax is pure sorcery. =)

4. Conclusion

If you're struggling with OOP in JavaScript there are lots of classical object oriented libraries available to help you out, like this one: https://github.com/javascript/augment

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