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I am getting this error in Visual Studio 2010 Pro: "Error C2953: 'list_1::Node' : class template has already been defined"

Here is my Node.cpp class list that is getting the error (on line 24, the last line of the code.)

#include "Node.h"

namespace list_1
{
    template <typename T>
    struct Node
    {
        //Constructor
        Node<T>(T D)
        {
            data = d;
            next = NULL;        
        }
    }
;}

And the Node.H file:

#pragma once

namespace list_1
{
    template <typename T>
    struct Node
    {
        T data;
        Node<T> *next;

        // Constructor
        // Postcondition: 
        Node<T> (T d);
    };
}

I already looked here, which doesn't help me since I am already using #pragma once, and in the list header file I have #ifndef LIST_H and #define LIST_H. This question doesn't suit my needs and everything in this answer seems to be related to having the template bit that I already have.

If I try making it struct Node I get the error "error C2753: 'list_1::Node' : partial specialization cannot match argument list for primary template"

So I am at a loss at what to do. Please help.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I agree with your compiler.. You are defining the struct twice.

To fix -

Remove from your header.

And your .cpp should look like this.

#include "Node.h"

namespace list_1
{
    //Constructor
    template<typename T>
    Node<T>::Node(T D){
        ...
    }
}

Essentially, the struct block only appears in the header.

Additionally I wonder if you are aware of the problems involving defining the template classes members in a .cpp file

share|improve this answer
    
Ok... But when I comment out the struct bit, I get the error "IntelliSense: expected a ';'" on the line with '{' under the 'Node<T>(T D)'. –  Sír Jeff Meadows Jan 27 '13 at 5:46
    
@SírJeffMeadows it needs to be as I have given in my answer, merely commenting is insufficient. And pls read the link I have added to the end. You might want to move the definition of the function from the .cpp to the .h, to avoid that issue. –  Karthik T Jan 27 '13 at 5:50
    
OK, I see what you mean. That did help. Thanks! –  Sír Jeff Meadows Jan 27 '13 at 6:15

For a normal (non-template) class, you'd do something like this:

//whatever.h
namespace Y 
    class X {
    public:
        X();
    };
}

Then in the cpp file, you'd have something like:

namespace Y { 
    X::X() { /* ... */ }
}

For a template, however, you normally need to put the implementation where the compiler will have seen it anywhere it's going to be used, which normally means putting into the header as well. That being the case, quite a few people just write the definitions as inline definitions inside the class definition:

namespace Y { 
    template <class T>
    class X {
    public:
        X(T d) { /* ... */ }
    };
}

You can define the function(s) outside the class definition if you want, but since they're going to be the header anyway, that doesn't really accomplish a lot (at least in the typical case).

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