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I am writing an application in Actionscript 2 that needs to access an XML file, get its contents, and then use that information to populate a bunch of text fields. This was straightforward in frame-based actionscript, because all I had to do was stop doing stuff, set the next step to run from the XML.onLoad function and I was good to go. But I'm rewriting this thing with class files and I'm having a hard time getting my XML to load in before the function is called that relies on it being in already.

To elaborate,

Let's say I have a class, Main. That class looks like:

import XMLItems;

class Main {
    private var _xmlItems:XMLItems;

    public function Main() {
        _xmlItems = new XMLItems();
        _itemData = _xmlItems.getItemData();
}

Looks OK so far, right? All it does is create a new XMLItems instance, and then call that instance's getItemData() method.

So now here's XMLItems:

import mx.xpath.XPathAPI;
import XMLLoader;

class XMLItems {

    private var _loader:XMLLoader;
    private var _itemData:XML;
    private var _eventPath:String = "/*/dbresult/playlist/";

    public function XMLItems() {
        trace('XMLItems object instantiated.');
    }

    private function parseItemData(itemData:XML):Array {
        var nodes:Array = XPathAPI.selectNodeList(itemData, _eventPath + "item");

        return nodes;
    }

    public function getItemData():Array {
        _loader = new XMLLoader();
        _itemData = _loader.getXML();
        var r:Array = parseItemData(_itemData);
        return r;
    }

}

So now we have an XMLLoader object to make so that we can call that getXML function (don't worry, last one):

import mx.xpath.XPathAPI;

class XMLLoader {

    private var _rawXML:XML;
    private var _xmlLocation:String = '';
    private var _recommendRequestURL:String;
    private var _xmlIsLoaded:Boolean = false;

    private var _eventPath:String = "/*/dbresult/playlist/";

    public function XMLLoader() {
        trace('Instantiating XML loader...');
        _recommendRequestURL = _root.recmReqUrl ? _root.recmReqUrl : escape('http://www.myURL.com/');

        _rawXML = new XML();
        _rawXML.ignoreWhite = true;

        var host = this;
        _rawXML.onLoad = function(success:Boolean) {
            if (success) {
                _xmlIsLoaded = true;
                trace('XML data was successfully loaded.');
                var nodes:Array = XPathAPI.selectNodeList(host._rawXML, host._eventPath + "item");
                trace("Number of XML nodes: " + nodes.length);
                trace("Sample node: " + nodes[nodes.length - 1]);
            } else {
                trace('There was an error loading the XML. Please check the XML file.');
            }
        }

        loadXML();
    }

    private function loadXML():Void {
        var xmlLocation:String;
        if ( !_root.recmReqUrl ) {
            trace("There is no network address for the XML file. Defaulting to local settings.")
        xmlLocation = './localBannerData.xml';
        } else {
            xmlLocation = _recommendRequestURL.concat( '&spec=', 'specInfo', 'getCatInfo()', 'getXCatInfo()', '&t=', new Date().getTime() );
        }

        if ( _rawXML.load( xmlLocation ) ) {
            trace('Loading XML file: ' + xmlLocation);
        } else {
                trace('I\'m having difficulty finding the XML. You might want to check your data source.')
        }

    }

    public function getXML():XML {
        return _rawXML;
    }

}

The problem is that when the getXML function is called, the XML hasn't loaded yet. So the method is returning an empty XML object to the XMLItems class, even though I did this:

_loader = new XMLLoader();
_itemData = _loader.getXML();

which I though meant that the constructor had to finish running before the next statement was evaluated. Apparently it does not.

I've tried making a boolean that is set by the onLoad function and putting a while (true) loop in the getXML method (before the method returned) that checks against that boolean and breaks if it returns true, but it never returned true, so it just looped forever.

I really don't understand what is happening here. Why can't I get the class to maybe request the XML synchronously and just chill until the XML comes in?

Thanks, SS

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Hrm, someone may correct me on this, but I don't think flash can load external resources (xml or otherwise) synchronously and I believe this may be by design. At least In my experience, whenever external resources are loaded it is always done asynchronously.

For AS2 XML specifically, it also says load() method calls are asynchronous:

The load process is asynchronous; it does not finish immediately after the load() method is executed. http://help.adobe.com/en_US/AS2LCR/Flash_10.0/help.html?content=Part2_AS2_LangRef_1.html

You probably already know what this means: you'll have to add a call back method or have your xml loading class throw some sort of 'complete' event you'd listen for (more or less the same thing on the surface for this problem I think).


added to answer as mentioned in comment

As mentioned in my comment, you can allow your class to throw custom events by using the EventDispatcher class. I am guessing this class was actually used for dispatching events from flash mx components, which is why it is in the mx package.

For you need to make your own Event class for event objects. From the docs/googling, (can't recall where exactly), at the base level an event has two properties: the target (a reference to the object that threw the event) and a name. You can always add more later or extend it if you want for your own custom events.

class Event {
    public var type:String;
    public var target:Object;

    public function Event(inputType:String, inputTarget:Object){
        type = inputType;
        target = inputTarget;
    }
}

Was double checking here, And it seems you actually don't need to make your own Event class, it can just be a generic object with these two required properties -but I like to make one anyways to reuse as needed and keep my code cleaner.

then in your (XML) class:

// add this
import mx.events.EventDispatcher;

class MyXMLClass {

    public MyXMLClass(){        
        // add this to your constructor
        mx.events.EventDispatcher.initialize(this);
    }

    // add these, leave these empty, they are init'ed during runtime
    private function dispatchEvent() {};
    public function addEventListener() {};
    public function removeEventListener() {};

} // end of class

now this adds 3 methods to your class. Within your class methods you can dispatch an event like so:

// first create the event object
var event:Event = new Event("complete", this); // 'this' refers to this current object
dispatchEvent(event);

outside of your class you can register an event listener like so:

var xmlObject:MyXMLClass = new MyXMLClass();

function eventListenerMethod(inputEvent:Event):Void {
    trace("I got the event: "+ inputEvent.type +" from "+ inputEvent.target);
}
xmlObject.addEventListener("complete", eventListenerMethod);

Now, since the event name "complete" is a constant string and should not change, I recommend making it a static constant in the event class like so:

class Event {
    // added this
    public static var COMPLETE:String = "complete";

    public var type:String;
    public var target:Object;

    public function Event(inputType:String, inputTarget:Object){
        type = inputType;
        target = inputTarget;
    }
}

So then you can reference it by going Event.COMPLETE like:

new Event(Event.COMPLETE, this);
addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, eventListenerMethod);

just to reduce the chance of typos and can refer to the events types you have by looking in your event class.

Now there is 1 more thing to worry about now: I've found the event handler method runs in the scope of the object that threw the event. You can verify this by adding trace(this); to the eventListenerMethod() method, and it should trace out your class, Not where that method was written. To solve this, you can use the Delegate class to make that method run in the scope of where it was written.

so before:

// assuming this is written in the timeline/frame
function eventListenerMethod(inputEvent:Event):Void {
    trace("I got the event: "+ inputEvent.type +" from "+ inputEvent.target);
    trace(this); // will trace out "xmlObject" instead of _level0 or _root as you might expect
}
xmlObject.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, eventListenerMethod);

you can go:

import mx.utils.Delegate;

function eventListenerMethod(inputEvent:Event):Void {
    trace("I got the event: "+ inputEvent.type +" from "+ inputEvent.target);
    trace(this); // should trace out _level0 / _root now or whatever 'this' was refering to in the Delegate.create() method
}
xmlObject.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, Delegate.create(this, eventListenerMethod));

Before I was also puzzling over the same issue as you for loading external data and hitting random scope problems and didn't know how to fix them properly (had to come up with 'creative' methods). =b

Discovering these two things is what allowed me to remain a bit more sane when I had to work in AS2 for a few years and these two things are done a lot better in AS3 (no scope issues/Delegate needed for example, and a lot of objects naturally already extend the EventDispatcher class making it more cleaner to work with or more 'native' as I like to say, and it has an actual Event class you can use/extend so you don't need to make your own).

Please go and try out the latter half of what I wrote to see if you really need to use the Delegate class though as you may not always need it and can sometimes cause its own problem with garbage collection when you need to remove event listeners (in this case my need to keep an explicit reference to the Delegate object you pass in to addEventListener() so you can pass it in to removeEventListener() later. In my experience I've almost always needed it though, which is why I added it to my answer. It can be useful for other things too I've found. By itself you can use it to run methods in the scope of other objects (in this case it is used to run the event listener method in the scope of the _root/"where it was written").

I highly recommend moving to AS3 when possible. I also recommend looking up the references for EventDispatcher and Delegate classes in the help to get a better idea of what is going on inside -I haven't had to write any real AS2 for a long time and my memory may be a bit fuzzy. All of what I wrote just now is mostly from memory. :)

share|improve this answer
    
OK, but if that's true, then how is anyone supposed to get XML data returned out of the class? It's impossible using the current setup: if you want to get XML data, you can't assign a class to handle it, so you have to do it inside of whatever class is going to use the data. Very poor language design, if you ask me. –  StormShadow Jan 28 '13 at 0:27
1  
@StormShadow: Show me a language that is used on client-server systems/applications that requests external resources synchronously over the network. Each application would "freeze" while loading external files in a synchronous way. As mitim mentioned you should use events and listeners/callbacks. BTW: It's not poor language design. But I would agree with you if you say AS 2 is one of the high-quality bull***t languages ;) –  freakazoid_em Jan 28 '13 at 1:00
    
I actually want to use listeners, but according to Adobe, only the Key, Mouse, MovieClipLoader, Selection, Stage, and TextField classes can broadcast events. I'm loading XML using a vanilla class that doesn't extend anything. Do I have to hackily extend one of those classes into my XML loader class to do that? –  StormShadow Jan 28 '13 at 1:17
1  
You can extend the EventDispatcher class that will let your class throw/dispatch events. I'll update my answer to include an example. –  mitim Jan 28 '13 at 1:24

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