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When I initialize a single element into a void structure, it works fine:

void* CMD_ARRAY[] = 
{
  {"+++\r"},
  {"+++\r"},
  {"+++\r"},
};

However, when I try to add more elements to the structure, i.e.:

void* CMD_ARRAY[] = 
{
  {"+++\r" ,  4,  1300},
  {"+++\r" ,  4,  1300},
  {"+++\r" ,  4,  1300},
};

I receive an error: "expected a "}""

What is the difference between a single element as in the 1st example, and a structure of a structures (which are also considered as elements...)? How can I achieve initialization of this void structure with mixed types?

Update: So I understand that the compiler doesn't know how to handle different types in the same elements. Is there a way to define these types on the fly (i.e. using casting) without actually defining the structure outside this definition (i.e. using an array of strucutres)?

share|improve this question
    
"What is the difference between a single element as in the 1st example, and a structure of a structures..." The difference is that you haven't told the compiler what their type is. It can't just guess. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 27 '13 at 9:08
    
I know that there are other ways (i.e.defining a structure), but it will solve me a problem if I could achieve it in this way. –  user2015194 Jan 27 '13 at 9:09
    
@user2015194 What is your problem actually? I'd say whatever it is there is a better way to solve it than that way. –  junix Jan 27 '13 at 9:12

3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

I would suggest that the compiler can't guess certain details regarding your implicit struct declarations. For example, how is your compiler to guess that I wanted y in the example below to be a short?

struct foo { char *x; short y; unsigned int z; };

void* CMD_ARRAY[] = 
{
  &(struct foo){"+++\r" ,  4,  1300},
  &(struct foo){"+++\r" ,  4,  1300},
  &(struct foo){"+++\r" ,  4,  1300},
};

This could be expanded at the cost of legibility to:

void* CMD_ARRAY[] = 
{
  &(struct { char *x; short y; unsigned int z; }){"+++\r" ,  4,  1300},
  &(struct { char *x; short y; unsigned int z; }){"+++\r" ,  4,  1300},
  &(struct { char *x; short y; unsigned int z; }){"+++\r" ,  4,  1300},
};

edit: In addition to the cost of legibility, consider what will happen if you decide to change your struct at the higher level. You'll have to do plenty of finding/replacing in the lower level. Does this sound sweet to you?

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Thank you! This is exactly the type of answer I've been waiting for. However, this didn't work for :-( I've typedef'd the foo struct and received: cast to type "foo" is not allowed. I guess the is armcc compiler problem and not a "C" issue –  user2015194 Jan 27 '13 at 10:45
    
I just edited for the sake of explaining why the expansion is actually a bad idea. Please consider going down the avenue of explicitly defining the struct where you need it in your architecture. You could put it in a .h file, with include guards, and #include "foo_structs.h" in every file that you need it. –  undefined behaviour Jan 27 '13 at 10:50
    
Sorry guys, but this is simply crappy code. It makes the code unnecessary hard to read and there is no advantage to declare an instance of the struct explicitly and link it by initializing the array. –  junix Jan 27 '13 at 14:42
    
I already stated that it's crappy code. It's what the question was asking for. Got a problem? –  undefined behaviour Jan 28 '13 at 1:01

The use of curly brackets as initializer implies the initialization of a structured information. You are initializing a void-pointer array. So the compiler expects a set of pointers he can store in this array. Your second variant is not a pointer anymore it's a approximately 12 bytes long. There is not enough room for this in a single void-pointer array cell.

Moreover I get the feeling that something bad is rising at the horizon while looking at this code. What exactly are you trying to do?

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I have a generic device layer, which is used to activate different devices. The generic data structure is defined in the interface layer, and the application above it can use the generic structure (without knowing what is he actually using). This initialization code is from the device lowest layer - I don't want to include the definition from the interface into the device file, so I want to initialize only a plain data structure, which I will later point to as the generic type. I hope I was clear enough :-) –  user2015194 Jan 27 '13 at 9:16
    
Actually it wasn't clear enough for my. Why not only storing handles (pointers to the device structure actually) in this list and define the structures elsewhere? –  junix Jan 27 '13 at 9:25
    
Application layer -> Uses a generic device type. Interface Layer -> Holds a pointer to the proper device structure (one of many). Device Layer -> Defines specific structures for each device (not aware to existence of higher layers with generic types). Eventually, the reason to avoid defining a structure is that I do not want to include generic type from the interface level to the device level, and on the other hand, I don't want to duplicate structure definitions from one layer to another. –  user2015194 Jan 27 '13 at 9:38
    
@user2015194 Ok, and the reason for not issuing a call like void * DeviceXYHandleGet(int num) returning a void pointer to an instance of it's structure is what again? Your initialization code can pass this handle to the application which is passing it through all layers down to the device drivers which know how to use this data? You don't need to duplicate structure definitions and one of the parts of your software needs to know about the concrete devices. –  junix Jan 27 '13 at 9:47
    
I do initialize the proper structure by passing a void pointer. This is why I insist of a void structure. This void pointer will be casted, in the upper interface layer, to the generic type, no matter from which device I've received it... –  user2015194 Jan 27 '13 at 10:29

You have an array of pointers not an array of structures. A literal string initialiser is a single pointer that can be assigned to a void pointer, to use a structured initialiser, it has to be assigned to a matching structure - otherwise how would the compiler know whet to place the data in memory?

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So how could I tell the compiler that he has an array of pointers to structures (without actually defining the structure outside this definition)? –  user2015194 Jan 27 '13 at 9:15
    
@user2015194 You get another serious problem: How do you know later what the structure looks like? - I'd say your design is not well thought through –  junix Jan 27 '13 at 9:20
    
I have a definition in a higher layer. But this structure is used in lower layers (which do not "know" about existence of higher layers...) –  user2015194 Jan 27 '13 at 9:23
    
The solution here seems simple: Put the definition in the lower layers. –  undefined behaviour Jan 27 '13 at 10:34
    
So you have your "design" upside down!? While you can have avoid pointer reference any object, you cannot have it initialised as if it were a specific object. Either teh definition must be at the lower level, or the initialisation must be performed by the higher level. You could perhaps use a callback for that. –  Clifford Jan 27 '13 at 10:39

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