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I am trying to use shared memory with 2 programs which I have shown here. a and b are integer arrays and array1 and array2 are arrays of strings. This is the snippet first program which loads the data in the memory

int size = (NUMBER_OF_DATA*(sizeof(int)+sizeof(float)));
key_t key1, key2, key3;
key1 = ftok("/home/an/Desktop/newww.c", 4);
key2 = ftok("/home/an/Desktop/part1.c", 5);
key3 = ftok("/home/an/Desktop/part2.c", 6);
int shmid = shmget(key1, size, 0777|IPC_CREAT);
int shmid1 = shmget(key2, 20*NUMBER_OF_DATA, 0777|IPC_CREAT);
int shmid2 = shmget(key3, 20*NUMBER_OF_DATA, 0777|IPC_CREAT);
int *a = (int *)shmat(shmid, 0, 0);
float *b = (float *)(a + NUMBER_OF_DATA);
char **array1 = (char **)shmat(shmid1, 0, 0);
printf("array1 %p\n", &array1);
char *mempos = (char *)(array1 + NUMBER_OF_DATA); 
printf("MEMPOS %p\n", &mempos);
char **array2 = (char **)shmat(shmid2, 0, 0);
char *mempos1 = (char *)(array2 + (NUMBER_OF_DATA)); 

for(i=0; i<NUMBER_OF_DATA; i++)
{
    a[i] = a[i];
    b[i] = b[i];
    array1[i] = mempos; 
    strcpy(array1[i], array1[i]);
    mempos += 20;
    array2[i] = mempos1;
    strcpy(array2[i], array2[i]);
    mempos1 += 20;
    printf("%p  %p  %p  %p\n", &a[i], &b[i], array1[i], array2[i]);
}

j = 0;
while (j<5)
{
    j++;
    for (i=0; i<NUMBER_OF_DATA; i++)
    {
        printf("%s  %s  %d  %f\n", array1[i], array2[i], a[i], b[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");
    sleep(2);
}

I am trying to load some data in the shared memory by the above file and alter the elements in the shared memory by the file below. But as soon as I update a string in the file below, I get garbage values from the program above instead of the altered values. I am totally confused. Have tried debugging with gdb but everything looks okay there.

int size = (NUMBER_OF_DATA*(sizeof(int)+sizeof(float))) + (2*(20*NUMBER_OF_DATA));
key_t key1, key2, key3;
key1 = ftok("/home/an/Desktop/newww.c", 4);
key2 = ftok("/home/an/Desktop/part1.c", 5);
key3 = ftok("/home/an/Desktop/part2.c", 6);
int shmid = shmget(key1, size, 0777|IPC_CREAT);
int shmid1 = shmget(key2, 20*NUMBER_OF_DATA, 0777|IPC_CREAT);
int shmid2 = shmget(key3, 20*NUMBER_OF_DATA, 0777|IPC_CREAT);

int *a = (int *)shmat(shmid, 0, 0);
float *b = (float *)(a + NUMBER_OF_DATA);
char **array1 = (char **)shmat(shmid1, 0, 0);
printf("array1 %p\n", &array1);
char *mempos = (char *)(array1 + NUMBER_OF_DATA); 
printf("MEMPOS %p\n", &mempos);
char **array2 = (char **)shmat(shmid2, 0, 0);
char *mempos1 = (char *)(array2 + (NUMBER_OF_DATA)); 
int i;
for(i=0; i<5; i++)
{
    printf("enter\n");

    array1[i] = mempos; 
    scanf("%s", array1[i]);
    mempos += 20;
}

What is the solution?

share|improve this question
    
why are you not using the boot shared memory library? –  drone.ah Jan 27 '13 at 10:58
    
I don't see any error checking in your code whatsoever - how do you even know that all your calls to shmget, shmat, etc are successful ? –  Paul R Jan 27 '13 at 10:59
    
@drone.ah: it's tagged c, so boost is presumably not an option (otherwise I'd agree with you - boost::interprocess is the way to go for C++) –  Paul R Jan 27 '13 at 10:59
    
ah! my bad.. Apologies. –  drone.ah Jan 27 '13 at 11:01
2  
For new code there should be no need to use the complicated shmget etc calls. Use the modern POSIX interfaces shmopen and mmap, instead. –  Jens Gustedt Jan 27 '13 at 11:08

1 Answer 1

The problem is most likely not what you think it is, but your arrays. An array of arrays is not the same thing as a pointer to a pointer.

An array is a contiguous area of memory, and an array of arrays is a contiguous area of contiguous areas, i.e. all of the arrays are following each other. A pointer to a pointer can be seen as an array of pointers, the memory layout is completely different.

Also only the array of pointers are shared but not what the pointers actually point to.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1, generally speaken the OP has to learn a lot before attempting to write code for shared memory. Already the amount of casts in the code makes me dizzy, good C code usually doesn't need any cast. –  Jens Gustedt Jan 27 '13 at 11:07
    
@JensGustedt I hope you know that we always have to case a void* pointer ! that we get from the shared memory address –  Nidhi Dwivedi Jan 27 '13 at 11:21
    
@Nidhi: what you say is incorrect for C - it only applies to C++ ! –  Paul R Jan 27 '13 at 15:50

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