Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I think the best way to ask this question is with some code... can I do this? (edit: ANSWER: no)


    class MyModel(models.Model):    
        foo = models.CharField(max_length = 20)    
        bar = models.CharField(max_length = 20)  

        def get_foo(self):  
            if self.bar:  
                return self.bar  
            else:  
                return self.foo  

        def set_foo(self, input):  
            self.foo = input  

        foo = property(get_foo, set_foo)  

or do I have to do it like this:

Yes, you have to do it like this:

class MyModel(models.Model):
    _foo = models.CharField(max_length = 20, db_column='foo')
    bar = models.CharField(max_length = 20)

    def get_foo(self):
        if self.bar:
            return self.bar
        else:
            return self._foo

    def set_foo(self, input):
        self._foo = input

    foo = property(get_foo, set_foo)

note: you can keep the column name as 'foo' in the database by passing a db_column to the model field. This is very helpful when you are working on an existing system and you don't want to have to do db migrations for no reason

share|improve this question
1  
I think this is a good question but you should post your 'answer' as an actual answer. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/17845/…. –  Michael Bylstra Oct 24 '12 at 6:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

A model field is already property, so I would say you have to do it the second way to avoid a name clash.

When you define foo = property(..) it actually overrides the foo = models.. line, so that field will no longer be accessible.

You will need to use a different name for the property and the field. In fact, if you do it the way you have it in example #1 you will get an infinite loop when you try and access the property as it now tries to return itself.

EDIT: Perhaps you should also consider not using _foo as a field name, but rather foo, and then define another name for your property because properties cannot be used in QuerySet, so you'll need to use the actual field names when you do a filter for example.

share|improve this answer
2  
regarding the edit, that is good advice - I am maintaining an existing system and because the name of the field must be changed (or of the property) we abandoned this approach. The technique might turn out to be useful in the future though :) –  Jiaaro Sep 23 '09 at 13:52
    
wasn't sure if it would be accessible via closure or something like that - admittedly, I do not know much about closures –  Jiaaro Dec 8 '09 at 19:41
1  
I have provided the case for '__foo' below. Using foo as a Field and another_foo as wrapping property will expose foo for direct manipulation. Although a developer in python as well as in X language should know what he is doing - there is a reason hidden variables are accepted to be a part of the language. –  Yauhen Yakimovich Sep 10 '12 at 20:15

As mentioned, a correct alternative to implementing your own django.db.models.Field class, one should use - db_column argument and a custom (or hidden) class attribute. I am just rewriting the code in the edit by @Jiaaro following more strict conventions for OOP in python (e.g. if _foo should be actually hidden):

class MyModel(models.Model):
    __foo = models.CharField(max_length = 20, db_column='foo')
    bar = models.CharField(max_length = 20)

    @property
    def foo(self):
        if self.bar:
            return self.bar
        else:
            return self.__foo

    @foo.setter
    def foo(self, value):
        self.__foo = value

*__foo* will be resolved into *MyModel_foo* (as seen by dir(..)) thus hidden (private). Note that this form also permits using of @property decorator which would be ultimately a nicer way to write readable code.

Again, django will create *_MyModel table with two fields foo and bar.

share|improve this answer
    
this is odd, but in my case, django 1.4.5 on postgres I'm getting a column foo in this case... I haven't used setter and getter and the property is read-only –  Evgeny Mar 2 '13 at 22:03
    
Could you post the code? I am confused. In my understanding properties mechanism is provided by decorator "@property", but if you have not used it then what you call "read-only property" must be an object field .foo (attribute in python). Can you or can you not actually assign anything to "my_model.foo = 'baz' ?? –  Yauhen Yakimovich Mar 3 '13 at 22:09
    
How would you access foo? MyMode.objects.order_by('__foo')? –  agconti Aug 26 '13 at 16:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.