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I have some code which is effectively this:

class dummie_type
{
    public:
    int a;

    void do_stuff()
    {
        // blah
    }
};

class dummie_type dummie[10];

void main()
{
    subroutine();
}

void subroutine()
{
    dummie[3].a = 27; // etc...
    dummie[5].do_stuff();
}

Note that the array of classes is global, and I need it to remain so (its a long story). I need to change this code so that the array of classes is of variable length. I know that this will involve making a global pointer, and then setting that to point to a block of memory that gets malloc'ed or new'ed in main and I know that I will have to change the "." characters to "->" but other than that I keep failing to produce something that my compiler will accept. I'm particularly uncertain about the declaration of a global pointer to an array of classes.

Edit: Sorry I should have said earlier, the array size will be calculated once near the start of main() and will remain unchanged from then on.

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That's an array of objects, not an array of classes. –  Paul Mitchell Sep 21 '09 at 14:39
    
What is relevant is that, if he uses an array of objects, whenever he resizes the array, the constructor and destructor will be called FOR EACH ELEMENT, which doesn't make sense. –  Eduardo León Sep 21 '09 at 14:43
    
So he actually needs an array of pointers to objects, not a pointer to an array of objects. –  Eduardo León Sep 21 '09 at 14:45
2  
I find that incorrect. It's not going to reallocate every single push_back. –  GManNickG Sep 21 '09 at 14:47
    
Also, you could possibly kill any cache performance you would normally get out of a vector by using a vector of pointers. Your "vector of pointers" is really just a list. –  GManNickG Sep 21 '09 at 14:48
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I know that this will involve making a global pointer, and then setting that to point to a block of memory that gets malloc'ed or new'ed in main and I know that I will have to change the "." characters to "->" but other than that I keep failing to produce something that my compiler will accept. I'm particularly uncertain about the declaration of a global pointer to an array of classes.

That's basically all there is to it. You declare dummie as dummie_type * dummie; and then you do dummie = new dummie_type[size]; in main. And no, you don't need to change . to ->.

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duumie_type **dummie; –  Arkaitz Jimenez Sep 21 '09 at 14:40
    
Why? He didn't say he wanted an array of pointers. –  sepp2k Sep 21 '09 at 14:42
    
hmm, u are right! –  Arkaitz Jimenez Sep 21 '09 at 14:43
    
After accepting the vector answer as correct, out of idle curiosity I tried your suggestion and to my surprise it worked perfectly. And its simpler. I wonder why the vector solution has twice as many votes (10:5)? –  Mick Sep 21 '09 at 16:57
1  
Thinking about it more - I guess its because the vector solution has more flexibility, but its actually superfluous flexibility for my needs. –  Mick Sep 21 '09 at 17:00
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could you just change it so that's it's a vector?

std::vector<dummie_type> dummie;

int main() {

    //populate();
    //showing alternative loop based approach
    populateWithLoop(calc_size());
    subroutine();
 }

void subroutine()
{
    dummie[3].a = 27; // etc...
    dummie[1].do_stuff();
}

void populate() {

   dummie_type a;
   dummie_type b;
   dummie_type c;

   dummie.push_back(a);
   dummie.push_back(b);
   dummie.push_back(c);

   //will print out 3
   std::cout << dummie.size() << std::endl;

   dummie_type d;
   dummie.push_back(d);

   //will print out 4
   std::cout << dummie.size() << std::endl;


}

populateWithLoop(int n) {

   for(int i=0; i<n; i++) {
       dummie_type temp;
       dummie.push_back(temp);
   }
}

You can treat a std::vector pretty much like an array, so any existing code will still continue to work. You get the advantages of a variable length array without the downside's of having to manually manage the memory.

Edit: updated to show Mick how to populate the vector and get it's size.

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excuse my ignorance, but shouldn't there be a line in there which says how big the array is? Say at the start of main() we have int n = calc_size(); then can you add in the line where n gets used to set the size of the array.... or does the use of vector somehow bypass this step? –  Mick Sep 21 '09 at 14:54
    
He has a comment //populate dummie somehow. Here you would do something like dummie.resize(n);, or dummie.push_back(...). –  GManNickG Sep 21 '09 at 14:55
    
@Mick, I've edited my answer to make it clearer. It that doesn't help then let me know. –  Glen Sep 21 '09 at 14:59
    
With this edit you've got an error by accessing element [5] in the array. :) –  GManNickG Sep 21 '09 at 15:00
    
@GMan, oops. yes I do. thanks and fixed. –  Glen Sep 21 '09 at 15:02
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Use an array of POINTERS to objects of your class.

Using std::vectors, it could be something like

typedef dummie_type * dummie_ptr;
typedef vector<dummie_ptr> dummie_array;

Of course, you will have to search through all your code to replace a lot of .s with ->s. But that way, you can resize the array without calling the constructor and destructor a lot of times.

Here's an example

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    dummie_array my_array(5); // initial size

    for (int i = 0; i < 5; ++i)
         my_array[i] = new dummie_type(/* constructor parameters */);

    my_array.resize(8);
    for (int i = 5; i < 8; ++i)
         my_array[i] = new dummie_type(/* constructor parameters */);

    for (int i = 0; i < 8; ++i)
         my_array[i]->do_something(/* member function parameters */);

    for (int i = 0; i < 8; ++i)
         delete my_array[i];

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why pointer to pointer? I'm confused why this is necessary. –  GManNickG Sep 21 '09 at 14:46
    
The compiler will almost certainly handle searching the code for you as far as changing . to -> is concerned. Of course if the class has overloaded operator++, or anything else that works on a pointer, then it's harder to ensure you've changed everything that needs changing. –  Steve Jessop Sep 21 '09 at 14:49
    
@GMan: I think Eduardo is assuming that the class might have constructor/destructor/assignment that do a lot of work, and hence a vector of dummie_type would potentially be very painful to resize. Indeed, dummie_type might not even be assignable at all in which case a vector is impossible. Obviously the class in the example code doesn't have any of these problems (its constructor and destructor do absolutely nothing), so a vector of pointers would be a waste of effort in that case. –  Steve Jessop Sep 21 '09 at 14:53
    
@onebyone: What if the class handles resources, say, allocating them in the constructor and deallocating them in the destructor? The class might be small, the constructor and destructor may have nothing but three instructions each, but using a vector of dummie_type would be DANGEROUS to resize!!! –  Eduardo León Sep 21 '09 at 15:09
    
@Eduardo: When I say "a lot of work", I don't necessarily mean a lot of lines of code, I mean a lot of time. In this case, the assignment operator and copy constructor should either copy the resources ("lot of work") or be marked private with no implementation ("not assignable"). Otherwise the class is dangerous to exist at all, never mind whether you have a vector of them. One should not work around a completely broken class by avoiding vectors of them - the class should be fixed. So I assume that the questioner's class is not broken in the way you describe. –  Steve Jessop Sep 21 '09 at 16:48
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If you were to implement this as a vector, as Glen has suggested, when you need to do your one-time allocation near the beginning you would reserve(), e.g.:

int slots_i_need = 0;
if (/* ... */)
   slots_i_need = 4096;
else
   // ...
// ...
dummie.reserve(slots_i_need);

A minor efficiency would be to test whether the initial capacity allocated by the compiler is sufficient for your needs. In that case, you wouldn't need to reallocate. A vector's initial capacity is reserved during the first push_back:

// ...
dummie_type a_dummie = new dummie_type();
dummie.push_back(a_dummie);
if (slots_i_need > dummie.capacity())
   dummie.reserve(slots_i_need);
else
   {} // nothing to do.
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I don't think you need to change your accessors. In C++, an array is little different from a pointer. Consider how you pass an array to a function:


void MyFunc(thing *p)
{
    ...
}

thing aThings[10];
thing *pThings = new thing[10];
MyFunc(aThings);
MyFunc(pThings);
You should then be able to replace

class dummie_type dummie[10];

with


class dummie_type *dummie;

You will have to deal with the initial allocation of the "array". This form will allow you to keep your current usage.


void subroutine()
{
    dummie[3].a = 27; // etc...
    dummie[5].do_stuff();
}
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