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Hi i have few doubt related to heap variable...

I want to write a function as below ->

struct test
{
   int x;
   int y;
};

test* fun()
{
    test *ptr = new test;

    return ptr;
}
  1. My doubt is returning a heap variable once it will go out of scope it will lost its value.

  2. There is definitely a memory leak.(As heap variable is not deleted.)

So how can i design such kind of function.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Dynamically allocated objects (what you call heap variables) do not get destroyed at the end of the scope in which they were created. That's the whole point of dynamic allocation. While the test object is dynamically allocated, the pointer ptr is not - it will be destroyed when it goes out of scope. But that's okay! You copy the value of the pointer out of the function and this copy still points at the test object. The test object is still there. The function you've written is fine, but it isn't exactly good style.

Yes, there is a memory leak if nobody ever does delete on a pointer to the test object you created. That's a problem with returning raw pointers like this. You have to trust the caller to delete the object you're creating:

void caller()
{
  test* p = fun();
  // Caller must remember to do this:
  delete p;
}

A common C-style way of doing this (which is definitely not recommended in C++) is to have a create_test and destroy_test pair of functions. This still puts the same responsibility on the caller:

void caller()
{
  test* p = create_test();
  // Caller must remember to do this:
  destroy_test(p);
}

The best way to get around this is to not use dynamic allocation. Just create a test object on the stack and copy it (or move it) out of the function:

test fun()
{
    test t;
    return t;
}

If you need dynamic allocation, then you should use a smart pointer. Specifically, the unique_ptr type is what you want here:

std::unique_ptr<test> fun()
{
    return std::unique_ptr<test>(new test());
}

The calling function can then handle the unique_ptr without having to worry about doing delete on it. When the unique_ptr goes out of scope, it will automatically delete the test object you created. The caller can however pass it elsewhere if it wants some other function to have the object.

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but some times we need to create pointer ...and with out using a smart pointer is there any way of improvement? –  Astro - Amit Jan 27 '13 at 17:19
    
If you need dynamic allocation and you can't use smart pointers, then you have to pass raw pointers around like you are doing. That's not very good C++ style, however. –  Joseph Mansfield Jan 27 '13 at 17:20
    
yes you mean to say i can pass the pointer to the function. –  Astro - Amit Jan 27 '13 at 17:21
    
@Badshah No, your function works as it is. It just relies on the caller doing something that you can't be sure they will. –  Joseph Mansfield Jan 27 '13 at 17:22
    
adding: and in current implementaion how caller can take care as you have mentioned that "caller to delete" –  Astro - Amit Jan 27 '13 at 17:22
  1. You are not returning a heap variable, you are returning a value of a stack variable that holds a pointer to the heap. The stack variable goes out of scope; the memory pointed to by the pointer is in the heap - it never goes out of scope.

  2. There will be a memory leak unless you release the memory in the caller.

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My doubt is [that] returning a heap variable once it will go out of scope it will lo[se] its value.

No worry, because since you're returing the pointer by value; so the pointer will go out of scope, but since you're returning the memory that it points to, there is no memory leak (only if we can rely on the caller to delete it).

However, if we had returned the pointer by reference then we would have a problem:

test*& fun() // note the & (reference)
{
    test *ptr = new test;

    return ptr;
}

Here you're returning a reference to a temporary. When the variable goes out of scope you will be using an object that doesn't exist. This is why you can't return temporaries by reference.

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My doubt is returning a heap variable once it will go out of scope it will lost its value.

No heap variable does not go out of scope as do go stack variables...

There is definitely a memory leak.(As heap variable is not deleted.)

Yes we have to free memory allocated on heap by ourself, otherwise there is memory leak...

I would suggest to read some tutorial related to it.

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