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I have created a map using LeafletJS and added a button which serve as a trigger powered via jQuery. However using .click() event listener didn't work. So I looked at source of the page and did some experimenting.

I have discovered that almost all of the code generated via JavaScript was invisible to jQuery I could not use almost any of the map's elements as triggers or influence them in any way (for example using .css()).

I'd like to know two things:

  • Why is HTML generated via JavaScript is invisible to jQuery? And is it library(LeafletJS) specific
  • Is there a way to reach HTML generated via JavaScript library using jQuery without modifying the library it self?
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Keep in mind $.live is deprecated, due to be removed altogether, and strongly discouraged. Use $.on instead. –  Jared Farrish Jan 27 '13 at 21:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reason you can't touch anything in there with your jQuery is because the code in LeafletJS runs asynchronously. When you run your jQuery code, the elements in question have not yet been created.

You have to run your jQuery code in the whenReady callback.


If you're just trying to listen to click events, you could use event delegation:

$(document).on('click', 'The CSS selector', function () {
    // Your code here...
});

This'll work, but for performance reasons you should bind the event listener to the element on which you are calling LeafletJS.

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Thanks for answer now I just have to figure out how to get to dynamically created objects. –  PovilasID Jan 27 '13 at 21:58

To use the click() function correctly with html generated with JS you need to use the live() function http://api.jquery.com/live/:

$('.element').live('click', function(){
  // your code here
});
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.live( events, handler(eventObject) )

version deprecated: 1.7, removed: 1.9

Using ".on()" is more correct.

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