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For example, given a line a11b12c22d322 e... the fields of break are the numbers or spaces, we want to transform it into

a
b
c
d
e
...

sed need to read the whole line into memory, for gigabytes a line, it would not be efficient, and the job could not be done if we don't have sufficient memory.

EDIT:

Could anyone please explain how do grep, tr, Awk, perl, and python manipulate the memory in reading a large file? What and how much content do they read into memory once a time?

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1  
What's the point of the transformation? You'd be better off using the data as it is if it really is several gigabytes long. –  Mat Jan 27 '13 at 18:29
    
Gigabytes... Perhaps whip up a quick C program, is that an option? If break condition is simple enough, you can probably make it a one-liner... ;) –  hyde Jan 27 '13 at 19:17
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you use gawk (which is the default awk on Linux, I believe), you can use the RS parameter to specify that multi-digit numbers or spaces are recognized as line terminators instead of a new-line.

awk '{print}' RS="[[:digit:]]+| +" file.txt

As to your second question, all of these programs will need to read some fixed number of bytes and search for its idea of a line separator in an internal buffer to simulate the appearance of reading a single line at a time. To prevent it from reading too much data while searching for the end of the line, you need to change the programs idea of what terminates a line.

Most languages allow you to do this, but only allow you to specify a single character. gawk makes it easy by allowing you to specify a regular expression to recognize an end-of-line character. This saves you from having to implement the fixed-size buffer and end-of-line search yourself.

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2  
I would think RS='[[:digit:][:space:]]+' would be faster than alternation –  glenn jackman Jan 27 '13 at 19:05
    
Good point. It's not exactly the same, but it would only matter if you somehow wanted to consider "a12 3c" to have three fields, rather than 2. –  chepner Jan 27 '13 at 19:15
    
+1 This is the only answer that won't try to read a massive line into memory. –  mob Jan 27 '13 at 19:15
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Fastest... You can do it with help of gcc, here's a version which reads data from given file name if given, otherwise from stdin. If this is still too slow, you can see if you can make it faster by replacing getchar() and putchar() (which may be macros and should optimize very well) with your own buffering code. If we want to get ridiculous, for even faster, you should have three threads, so kernel can copy next block of data with one core, while another core does processing, and third core copies processed output back to kernel.

#!/bin/bash

set -e

BINNAME=$(mktemp)

gcc -xc -O3 -o $BINNAME - <<"EOF"
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main(void)
{
    int sep = 0;

    /* speed is a requirement, so let's reduce io overhead */
    const int bufsize = 1024*1024;
    setvbuf(stdin, malloc(bufsize), _IOFBF, bufsize);
    setvbuf(stdout, malloc(bufsize), _IOFBF, bufsize);
    /* above buffers intentionally not freed, it doesn't really matter here */

    int ch;
    while((ch = getc(stdin)) >= 0) {
        if (isdigit(ch) || isspace(ch)) {
            if (!sep) {
                if (putc('\n', stdout) == EOF) break;
                sep = 1;
            }
        } else {
            sep = 0;
            if (putc(ch, stdout) == EOF) break;
        }
    }

    /* flush should happen by on-exit handler, as buffer is not freed,
       but this will detect write errors, for program exit code */
    fflush(stdout); 

    return ferror(stdin) || ferror(stdout);
}
EOF

if [ -z "$1" ] ; then
  $BINNAME <&0
else
  $BINNAME <"$1"
fi

Edit: I happened too look at GNU/Linux stdio.h, some notes: putchar/getchar are not macros, but putc/getc are, so using those instead might be a slight optimization, probably avoiding one function call, changed code to reflect this. Also added checking return code of putc, while at it.

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Nice C code implementation! Could you illustrate how to do multi-core multi-threading? –  Osiris Xu Jan 27 '13 at 21:36
    
What if the line-break is a regular expression, say "\n"? –  Osiris Xu Jan 27 '13 at 21:45
1  
Developing a multi-core version is a bit too much work to do just for fun ;). Also the whole thing will be IO bound, so speedup is probably quite minor. Also regular expressions (#include <regex.h>) are quite a bit of work, at least for regular expression which may match more than one character, because buffer boundaries would need special handling to not miss a match at boundary. For '\n' specificaly, isspace() will actually match any whitespace so that is covered by above. –  hyde Jan 27 '13 at 22:14
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With grep:

$ grep -o '[^0-9 ]' <<< "a11b12c22d322 e"
a
b
c
d
e

With sed:

$ sed 's/[0-9 ]\+/\n/g' <<< "a11b12c22d322 e"
a
b
c
d
e

With awk:

$ awk 'gsub(/[0-9 ]+/,"\n")' <<< "a11b12c22d322 e"
a
b
c
d
e

I'll let you benchmark.

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Cool idea. How does grep manipulate the memory? What content does grep read into memory once a time? –  Osiris Xu Jan 27 '13 at 18:35
    
For short length of data, sed will be fine. But for gigabytes of data in a line, sed will not work well. I tested it previously. –  Osiris Xu Jan 27 '13 at 18:37
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Try with tr:

tr -s '[:digit:][:space:]' '\n' <<< "a11b12c22d322e"

That yields:

a 
b 
c 
d 
e
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The delimiters are digits, not spaces –  Jim Garrison Jan 27 '13 at 18:32
    
@JimGarrison: Oops! I swear that I read spaces. Perhaps was edited. Thanks for point it out. Already edited to fix it. –  Birei Jan 27 '13 at 18:37
    
The question does state numbers or spaces. –  chepner Jan 27 '13 at 18:51
    
@chepner: Right. Edited again to add [:space:]. –  Birei Jan 27 '13 at 18:57
2  
The first version of the question only mentioned digits; spaces were added later. You can verify by looking at the edit history of the question. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 27 '13 at 19:02
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